student ownership of the classroom

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Unregistered, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Feb 27, 2004

    Does anyone have any ideas for helping the students to feel ownership over the classroom as well? Or thought on how this may help with student motivation and classroom management? This is a concept I am very interested in and would love multiple perspectives on it. Thanks!
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Feb 27, 2004

    What age level are you looking at?

    I've been in classrooms where the students have helped make the rules at the beginning of the year, and I've done this at summer camp... it seems to be a good way to get them involved in how it's run... and a lot of times, they're stricter than you would be! Also, depending on the students, allowing them to help you come up with logical consequences for the rules helps them maintain them (they can't argue that it's unfair since they came up with it themselves).

    I've found that projects and active learning motivate students to want to participate... I did my student teaching with 2nd graders, and many of them were silly and talkative... we did a unit on "sink or float" in science... since we were using lots of water, we needed them to not be silly... so anyone caught being islly or goofing off would have to sit in the observation chair instead of participating... not a single child had to sit out during any of our lessons, although many of them are silly during other times... so the project itself and the thought of not being able to participate in it was VERY motivating. :)
     
  4. awaxler

    awaxler Comrade

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    Mar 1, 2004

    Hi,

    I think the trick is to let your students "think" they are making up the rules of the class. For example, I tell my students at the begining of the year that we have one rule: "Respect People, Respect Property". I then have them come up with various ways that we can all show each other respect. The list of rules they come up with is great, but they all fall under the category of respect.

    However, I often give my kids ownership during review games. Before every test we play some type of review game. At this point in my career I have several reviews games that I can pull off in a moments notice (only the game format chages, but the questions are basically the same). At the begining of class I let the students vote on which game they want to play. This works as great way to gain respect from your students.

    Be careful though, you don't want to start a classroom management problem.

    Good luck,
    Adam Waxler
    www.teaching-teacher.com
     
  5. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Mar 1, 2004

    ownership

    Our 3 kindergartens have helped the students become a part of our classroom community by assigning each child a job for the week. This gives them a responsibility and a feeling of belonging. Itis also important to stress that their participation is vital to the survival of the class.
     
  6. teacherkasey

    teacherkasey Cohort

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    Mar 1, 2004

    My kids pick jobs each day... veteranarian, line leader, plant helper, etc. I also have a bulleting board very close to the floor where the children can hang up any work they create themselves. I hope I can explain this:rolleyes: ... I glued a wooden clothespin (the kind that you squeeze to open) on the top of a sheet of construction paper for each child. Then when they dried I wrote each child's name on a clothespin. Then I stapled them on the wall to make it into a bulletin board with this really cute border I found. The kids can hang up any artwork, writing, or anything else they create that they are proud of and want to display. The kids love being able to choose what is hung up and showing off their work. From their reactions, you would think this was the greatest thing since sliced bread:D ! Hope this helps:)
     
  7. nora

    nora Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2004

    One way also is to give group activities and let each group choose a leader that will manage the whole group, but making sure everybody's participating in the activity. They will have the feeling of control, but still, you as the teacher, is in authority. Maybe you could set a goal for them that should be implemented and followed up every now and then.
     
  8. chefmargie

    chefmargie Guest

    Mar 29, 2004

    I am actually doing my thesis on this topic and have come across many websites and sources of information. If you would like to have copies of what I have please drop me an email elementaryteacher@sbcglobal.net

    Have a great day!
     
  9. MJH

    MJH Companion

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    Mar 29, 2004

    Student Ownership

    I teach kindergarten and have been working on creating a classroom environment where the students take ownership of their learning and the classroom materials for 5 years now. At the beginning of the school before we decide on the class rules each student decides on a hope and dream for the year. We first brainstorm ideas and then the students draw a picture of their hope and dream and then either with me or an assistant it is written under the picture. When we get together to decide on class rules I remind them that they need to keep their hopes and dreams in mind. How or what do we each need to do to achieve our hope and dreams? I list their ideas and then we look at ones that can go together and mean the same. We also work on the wording, I make suggestion and the students decide themselves which ones they like. The students then pick one rule and they draw themself and their friends practicing the rule. These are posted around the room as a reminder. This process takes me an entire week to complete but my behavioral problems have really been cut in two.

    Other practices that have helped me are:
    1. Signing in each morning - it's like adults signing in for work, you leave home at home and now you are at school so let's focus.
    2. Morning Meeting - students get to greet each other in various ways, share information about themselves, do a fun activity and then morning message which lets them know about the learning taking place in the room.
    3. Teaching the students how to be a good friend. I love this one, I choose a student to hit me and knock me down on purpose but not very hard. I do discuss it with the child beforehand. The other students are stunned, but it allows them to see how to handle such a situation and we discuss it together.
    4. Letting the students make my center signs. They just love to draw and have their work in the room.
    5. I display a lot of their work in the room and outside. They are very proud of what they do and should be able to see their work displayed somewhere.
     
  10. HannahB2

    HannahB2 Companion

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    Mar 31, 2004

    That is a great way to do things. Every Week I pick a class helper and they pick people to help them do their jobs with them. Although, once you do this don't let them get to into it because it can start to get bad. Once I had a boy and he was REALLY BAD with this stuff. he thought he could make the rules and do watever he wanted to. one day he forgot his gym clothes so he try to break the window screen and get into the classroom for his stuff!! hat same day he did other bad stuff too, I said- Is there any classroom where you can be the teacher? He replied Yeah! I said Who's? He said Your's.


    *Hope I helped*
     

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