Student diagnosed with Crohn's disease...help!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mrsmit, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. mrsmit

    mrsmit New Member

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    Jan 23, 2018

    Hi there,
    The new school year is beginning next week and I have just been informed by a parent of a child in my class that their child has Crohn's disease and due to medication changes, the child will not be allowed to participate in any physical activity, this includes indoor games, outdoor games, morning fitness, PE lessons, drama classes etc. because the parent would like the child to save their energy for academic stuff because the child gets fatigued easily and needs to save their energy for maths and English.

    I am a 2nd year graduate and this is a new school for me, I have to meet with the parent and principal next week.

    My question is, what accomodations do I make. For example, if this child can't participate at lunch and recess they will be lonely, do I force my class to go on a rotating roster of sitting with him on breaks so he doesn't get lonely? What other activities can I give him for breaks, PE lessons, drama lessons, times when the class plays games etc that he won't resent or make him feel isolated? All I can think of are card games, read a book etc.

    I don't know the child yet so maybe there won't be a problem or perhaps the parent is overplaying how serious it is. Apart from reading up about his disease I'm not sure how else to accomodate in a caring way, any advice would be great!

    I'm mostly worried about him socially (already, term hasn't even started!)

    Thanks in advance
     
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  3. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Jan 23, 2018

    He still needs to go with the class. He needs the social interaction. I know during PE that kids usually have some free time to interact with others. He can go without exercising. He can socialize during lunch, too.
     
  4. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Jan 23, 2018

     
  5. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Jan 23, 2018

    I had a similar situation where a student had many limitations due to an illness. I was not the one to take control of this and I did not want to. The school nurse and social worker met with the parents and they discussed what the child could do and not do. (There was also doctor input via letters).The information was then passed on to me and any other staff member that needed to know. There was then documentation on file with the nurse and all involved knew what the student could and could not do.
     
  6. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jan 24, 2018

    As a new teacher, this is a good opportunity for you to learn to establish professional boundaries for yourself. You would be well-advised to follow janlee's example and let others who are employed to help with these situations take the lead. The fact that you are already "mostly worried about him socially" is a red flag that perhaps your maternal instincts need to be kept in check. Teachers who unknowingly (or knowingly) go down that path all too often write in for advice after they take on way too many responsibilities that are not on their job description.
     
  7. mrsmit

    mrsmit New Member

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    Jan 24, 2018

    Thanks Been There, janlee and SpecialPreskoo.

    I’m relieved to hear someone say to take a step back and let professionals tell me what to do and not do, usually I feel very pressured to do everything and anything for a student and feel constantly anxious and over my head as a result.
    This is very refreshing advice, thank you.
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jan 24, 2018

    Actually, all of these other teachers are responsible for coming up with ways to involve this student without making his medical condition worse, assuming that they have to give him a grade. What kind of class games are you considering? If they are educational games in the content area, and not just blowing off steam or energy, there shouldn't be a problem - learning is what he is saving his energy for.
     
  9. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Jan 24, 2018

    I agree with what the others said. Don't let them take away your prep time either to babysit the student during times where he can't participate in activities outside of the classroom.
     
    SpecialPreskoo and 2ndTimeAround like this.

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