Student behaviour

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Kasmith, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. Kasmith

    Kasmith New Member

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    Aug 9, 2013

    I take 17 classes for 45mins each in the library every week. One boy in his final year before high school refuses to participate in the lesson, and has left the library twice without me knowing he has gone. When the other students are working on the computers he asks if he can play games on the computer, and when I refuse, he is rude and belligerent. He constantly says he hates school and everything about it. He will say other children are teasing him and he walks off, when I know the rest of the class are on task and paying him no attention. He brings toys into the library when he can, and it makes it difficult for me as when I ask him to put them away he refuses. As I only see the class once a week I cannot watch him constantly, there are 26 lovely children in the class who deserve my attention. If I ignore the behaviour we walks out of the room or rips up his work saying he hates everything about school.

    Any advice on how to deal with this student is appreciated. There are no helpers with me and no funding for this student so that is not an option.
     
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  3. Listlady

    Listlady Companion

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    Aug 9, 2013

    I would wonder whether he has a learning disability or something (or how he acts when in other classes). Hmmm. Is there a student who can sit with him and help him? He may not be used to positive attention, and when he gets small doses of it, he could turn around. I don't know--that's a tough one.
     
  4. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Aug 9, 2013

    Are there any tasks with which you can have him help you? Maybe sorting some papers, organizing some books, help with book check out as the students arrive? Help with any lunch duties, etc?

    Sometimes having a student feel NEEDED is more effective than having him feel like he has to BEHAVE. When he receives your praise for a job well done, then you're starting to form a "hook".

    For the first few sessions, just have him help with a task...no conditions. Praise him: "Wow, Tony...you did such a wonderful job here! I'm really glad that you're helping me out because it truly makes my day one where I can smile more." Be sincere.

    After a week or two of this, then pull him aside and say, "Tony, you've been tremendous and I can't thank you enough. The thing is...there are certain things I need to teach each student and that includes you. So, for this week, I still need and want your help, but it will need to be AFTER you complete the lesson. How does that sound?" He'll (hopefully) still want to be the "Librarian's Helper" and do the lesson so he can get the reward.

    Then...after a month, perhaps treat him to a book of his own, or a sticker, bookmark, etc... just a little "bonus".

    At the end of the year, make a little reward and frame it (maybe 5" x 7") so he can bring it to his family and show them that he was truly a helpful citizen of his school community.

    Win-win. :)
     
  5. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 9, 2013

    Have you talked with him one-on-one away from his peers? Or with his other teachers?

    It really sounds like more is going on here in this kiddo's world. I agree with Listlady it sounds like there's a possibility that he might have a learning disability. He's doing everything in his power to escape. These guys often think: It's better to be thought of as a "bad" kid, than a "dumb" kid.

    Would it be possible to have him work for 30 minutes of your time with him and give him the final 15 on computer, if he has been on task?
     
  6. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Aug 9, 2013

    My first question would be the general setup of library time. You're in Australia so things may be quite different, but if this is 8th grade as we have in the US does he just independently come to your room during the period, or is there a classroom teacher that bring the class? If there is a classroom teacher, typically my experience is that the classroom teacher would deal with the situation, mainly because that teacher would be in a better position to implement a behavior plan consistent across the entire school day.

    Along those same lines, it's going to be very understandably challenging for you to implement a thorough behavior plan because you have such limited contact with him. You really aren't the position to do much assessment, etc. Given the more extreme nature of his behaviors, you're pretty limited with the resources you have going in.

    Also similarly, this is clearly a situation where administration needs to be involved. If the child is leaving the room unattended and without permission, you aren't in the position of being able to leave the other kids unattended and chase him down. Clearly, admin needs to be involved in the situation, at least at that point, if not sooner.

    All of that being said, you have asked for strategies in terms of what you could do given your limitations, so I'd say step one is figuring out the "why" of the behavior. Without knowing why he's refusing, you're going to be shooting blindly and randomly when it comes to interventions. We could tell you to ignore it, but if it's not attention-seeking that won't help. We could tell you to give him a consequence, but if he can't read and is trying to avoid embarrassment that won't help.

    One thing that might help us understand more and potentially generate some hypotheses about the behavior for you to consider would be a more descriptive run-down of exactly what happens when he comes to you - play-by-play, and not just with the problem behaviors, but positive ones too.
     
  7. Kasmith

    Kasmith New Member

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    Aug 10, 2013

    Tried that a few weeks ago, he isn't interested in helping or being helped by myself or another student.
     

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