Student Behavior with a Substitute

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by CMP1980, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. CMP1980

    CMP1980 New Member

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    Sep 13, 2007

    So, I've been teaching for five years, and I have a pretty well behaved class. Their worse problem for me is talking. However, no matter what I try, they always misbehave with a sub. For example, today, two girls got into a scratching war when the sub was there. This type of behavior does not happen for me. Any suggestions??? What am I doing wrong that the kids continue to misbehave with a sub? And yes, there are consequences for their actions such as a letter of apology to the sub, silent lunch, phone calls to parents, etc..
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 13, 2007

    You have done everything you can to ensure that they behave for the sub, but it is ultimately the sub's problem to deal with misbehavior. In my district, if a sub can't control a class they are blocked from subbing again. The sub needs to be able to lay down the law and put themselves in an authoratative manner.
     
  4. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Sep 13, 2007

    I think the consequences might be a bit light, and maybe not specific enough to the students who are misbehaving. Is it the sub who delivers the consequences, or is it you? If you're delivering them the next day, the kids may be used to the idea that the sub can't do anything to them (of course, the sub is doing something to them by proxy, but that's a bit of a stretch, and I imagine to kids tomorrow seems oh-so-far away).

    The other thing I might try to find is consequences the students would absolutely dread, not just things that are a pain in the neck for them. Delivering an especially fearsome consequence once is much better than a moderate consequence several times.
     
  5. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Sep 13, 2007

    What I do is a point system. The kids are told that they will either get a 0 if their name is on the sad face list for being disruptive. They will get 10 if they are well behaved and on the smile list.

    If a student's name is written down they will have to talk to me at recess about what went wrong and why whatever happened...happened...

    My students are aware of the consequences from the sub and me. They know the drill.
     
  6. patti2

    patti2 Cohort

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    Sep 14, 2007

    I think I would let them know that the sub has the same power for taking away privileges/sending to the principal's office that you do! I would even tell them that if the sub has to punish them then they will also be speaking with you the next day. I always tell my kids that the sub will be in charge, including rewards and consequences and that the sub will be leaving me a note. I stick to my guns too....if they get on "the list" then they lose something the next day for not being responsible.
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Sep 19, 2007

    I've been on both sides of it, being a sub, long-term sub, & permanent teacher, so I've seen it. Kids just act differently when there's a different face in the room. Even the normally well behaved kids can goof off.

    I think the districts that ban a sub from subbing again if they can't control the class is a tad harsh. It is in this aspect that subbing is more difficult than being the actual teacher because the sub isn't used to the daily routine, knowing the kids & their personalities, & the classroom management, & the kids automatically know that & take advantage of that.

    Continue to stress to your class throughout the year that anytime a different adult is in the room that they are to obey & treat that person w/ the same respect. I know that many teachers do NOT tell their class that they won't be there because that's just getting the kids psyched up & ready to goof off the next day. Don't give your students that extra time in their minds to figure out how they'll be w/ the sub the next day. I agree NOT to tell kids when you'll be out.
     
  8. Here2Learn

    Here2Learn Companion

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    Sep 23, 2007

    I know when I was in school it seemed like the subs always had a hard time when the teacher expected them to carry out lessons as if the regular teacher was there. Also, if they just had busy work for the sub to give us then that was a failure. I think the best thing to do when a sub is going to be there is have a plan for the sub to go by. Kids are going to want to talk and goof around when a sub is there, period. Maybe if you instruct the sub to let the children work in pairs (not with a friend or someone who they are bound to act up with) this will allow them to talk without getting out of hand. Don't put pressure on the sub to make sure the children get X amount of things done. If they feel like things are getting rough and maybe it would help to play a game as a class or give them some free time then give the sub that freedom to choose. They are the ones who are there and are having to deal with the situation. A lot of times when there was a sub I remember the principal would stop in "just to check". Seeing him always reminded the kids that there were still rules to follow and that he would be aware of it if they weren't being followed!
     

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