Student behavior justified by parent!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by snickydog, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Feb 6, 2009

    Long story short, I have a student who acts out, particularly when dad is not around and grandma is taking care of him. He spent time in the office because he was swearing at another student. There's NO support at home for what he does at school... Dad is saying we as a school are not doing enough for the kid. I have a whole-class behavior plan, provide detailed notes about behavior daily, give a weekly summary of behavior, reward for positive behavior (including extra incentives that dad is supposed to be following through with at home), etc. He's a capable student (earns Bs) but dad wants him in sped for ADHD (but has not had him evaluated despite our school's recommendation to do so if he feels that is the issue). When this child gets his way, he can stay focused for longer periods of time than his peers. But when he doesn't want to do something? No way! (And he'll even say, "But I don't want to!" and cry about it... This is first grade!)

    Is there something I'm missing that I should be doing?
     
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  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Feb 6, 2009

    I know outbursts can be part of the coping problems of ADHD.

    It's unfortunate, but I would document everything. Document what leads up to the outbursts, what you did, what the child did, what the end result was, etc. That way you'll be able to establish a pattern and you can give it to the parents.
     
  4. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Feb 6, 2009

    Then he probably doesn't have ADHD. If he had ADHD he would never be able to focus regardless of any extrinsic motivation.
     
  5. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Feb 6, 2009

    Things like a read aloud he enjoys - he sits and listens and responds better than half the class at least. When he's doing a center he likes, he's fine and engaged. He doesn't like writing, so guess what? When he is asked to write, he sits for the whole time and doesn't put his pen to the paper, even after we talk through what he'll say.

    And the parents justify this... "He just doesn't like to write."

    Or when the art teacher disciplined him and told me what happened, I passed along word to the parent. What was the response? "I always believe my child's side of the story."

    Give me a break!
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Feb 7, 2009


    I agree. I have one student who really needs to be tested and I honestly can't even document her behavior because EVERY SINGLE THING we do, she is in lala land. I don't think she has completed one task on time this year (including cleaning up and getting her stuff on for recess). I would be documenting 20+ things each day!

    If he can focus when he chooses, then I'm thinking it might not be ADHD. I know my student just can't do it no matter how hard she tries.
     
  7. adventuresofJ

    adventuresofJ Comrade

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    Feb 7, 2009

    Make a chart in excel. Do a section for basic procedures that take her longer than everyone else - getting ready for recess/lunch/home - a space for daily assignments/subjects

    And then make check boxes check off every time she is in her her own little world and not paying attention to instruction and put in increments for how long it takes her to get something done...up to 5 minutes over allotted time..and then a box for completed or did not complete assignment. This might be easier than writing every little thing down - a check is much faster.

    You could try to time her? Have her beat her own score? or give her a sticker or something every time she gets something done in class on time...
     
  8. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Feb 7, 2009

    I was reading another thread on this forum and there was a reference to learned bad behavior at home that was never corrected. Part of me thinks that's this kid's problem. He can focus enough during a math test, to, say, complete it correctly (usually earning an A) in less time than the average student in the class. He likes read alouds and can listen well to those, particularly if it's a book he likes, and can respond well if it's a task her enjoys. Having worked with ADHD kids who needed CONSTANT redirection and extended time, etc.... I wonder, is the dad trying to use a label to explain his kid's negative behavior?
     
  9. teachall

    teachall Rookie

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    Feb 7, 2009

    I have had situations where parents believed the child so I write exactly what happens and then read it to the child and ask them if that is what happened. 99% of the time they agree and then I have them sign that they agree with what was written. That way when parents see it they know that I have discussed with the child what the problem was and they have agreed.;)
     
  10. JustT

    JustT Comrade

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    Feb 7, 2009

    Documenting doesn't need to be detailed. I would check on finding a list online and then just document the time it occured and instruction/redirection used. Use one sheet for each day. It becomes a quick check list that you can add up at the end of the day and the parent could possibly use to seek therapy or medical intervention.
     

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