Student acting out- any strategies?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by giraffe326, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 25, 2013

    I have a student in my new class that is having a difficult time. Let's call him Marvin. I heard his name at least a dozen times before I began this position.
    A bit about him- his DRA is a 4. His previous school was a Montessori ran by his aunt. Which they think means he's never been to school before. There are not any schools around here (public or private) that has Montessori past K.
    The school is trying to fast track him into SpEd.

    Now he is a huge behavior issue. I get that he doesn't understand anything so he acts out. However, he constantly bothers/picks on other students. He gets up and dances in the middle of instruction and thinks it is hilarious. He will not follow the simplest of directions. He immediately gets defensive and starts to argue. There is no talking with him. Regardless of the topic, he will complain about someone, defend himself for a prior infraction, or simply argue.

    This was his day today- 8:50 tardy bell rings. 9:00- kids are in gym. I pick them up at 9:30- no Marvin. P comes by to tell me that he will have Marvin for a while- there were issues in gym. Marvin comes back- immediately refuses to follow rules/directions/procedures. There were several instances- it started with sitting in the carpet area when the max number of people were already there. (Teachers rules since day 1- I am just the LTS.) I ask him to move- he starts tattling and complaining and acting out. I ask him to clip down. (teacher's method) He melts down. He eventually gets to teacher's choice, and he was told he couldn't leave his seat without raising his hand. As we're reviewing for the math test, he is shaking his butt so the rest of the class giggles. I moved him to a table at the front of the room. He proceeds to do it. I move him in an area by the document camera (where I am working) where he is not visible to 95% of the class (on the floor beside a bookshelf). He keeps hollering and carrying on.

    I seriously have no idea what to do with him. I have had students with ADD, ADHD, ODD, etc... and I could manage them fine. I have no idea what to do with Marvin.

    Any suggestions?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 25, 2013

    Document everything.
    What consequences are part of the classroom mgt plan?
     
  4. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Sep 25, 2013

    I would have a conversation with the rest of the class without him in the room. Convince them that he doesn't know how to act and they are going to be teaching him. They will ignore him and pretend they can't see him. You ignore him and keep working with the kids. Only talk to him and engage when he is making good choices. Be overly complimentary to the rest of the class for a while too.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 25, 2013

    P and I discussed beginning documentation this morning. So that is already happening.
    Tasha- I did say something to the rest of the class, but he was in the room. (He was shaking his butt every time I had my back turned to him. They all tattled. I told them to ignore him- he was only going it for attention.) I do need to talk to them without the him in the room. I have 8 SpEd kids, 1 child that doesn't speak any English spends 1.5 hours with tutor), and 4 more Title I pull out kids. I feel like there is a revolving door! I have 3 people on a push-in schedule at certain times (and one comes twice), and 5 people doing pull out. The student liaison and social worker also occasionally pull someone out. I feel like this: :dizzy:
    However, I will coordinate with my helpers and see if I can't pinpoint a time to have the chat.

    I wish I could isolate him. I have double desks, so there is no way to separate one person. Plus the room is super tiny- the kids can barely walk through when people are sitting, much less an adult. The teacher had all the SpEd kids sitting at the front two tables. However, they are coincidentally the behavior problems. So I have 4 fabulous groups and 2 that are terrible. I've been constantly thinking of seating arrangements, but I haven't come up with a plan yet.
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 26, 2013

    giraffe~is there any way you can separate the sped kids and place them with students who are more calming?
     
  7. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I plan on it. I am just trying to think it through first. Moving desks is time consuming since they have to empty them to move to another desk.

    I talked with the P today about Marvin (AND I ACCIDENTALLY CALLED HIM MARVIN IN CLASS TODAY! :lol:) I'm to document everything (started yesterday anyway) and we are going to try to fast track him into a self contained SpEd room. There are obvious issues! He obviously needs the smaller setting.
     
  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 26, 2013

    I would make sure that you have a classroom policy with consequences. When a child misbehaves, that child should get a consequence. If you like to be positive, class points or other positive things can be added. Make sure, even if the consequence is small, that the child gets one each time. If this isn't common in your classroom, the students will rebel for a few days at least. This means you won't see improvement during this time. Eventually, they will see that you mean business and they will decrease their misbehavior.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Just to fill in background- I am currently just a 12 week LTS. I started this job on Tuesday. The teacher has a behavior management system (clips :down:) and consequences/rewards that I have been following to a T.
    Only one student is disruptive. The rest of the class is totally manageable.
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 26, 2013

    Thanks for the info that does change things a lot. I didn't realize you were a LTS. That makes it more difficult. Can there be a way to send the child to another classroom when he gets that out of control?

    The other thing which works really well is to have a class incentive system for a fun activity. Let's say 7-10 min./day depending on how much they earn. All students can help.

    Now this is where your disruptive student comes in. Work out a system with the disruptive student that each time he doesn't disrupt for 20 minutes, the whole class earns 30 seconds of fun time and they clap for him for helping them. Let disruptive student know that if he doesn't make it 20 minutes in the day, he can not play. This technique is the best I have ever seen for the really disruptive student--especially when you have just 1 that stands out. All of a sudden this child gets his attention from the class by being good. This is from Fred Jones' Tools For Teaching book.
     
  11. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 26, 2013

    I wasn't a LTS. I just quit my job and took this one instead. LOONNGG story!

    Thanks for the suggestion. I will try it out next week. Tomorrow is just a 1/2 day.

    A change of scenery doesn't really help him. He would just disrupt their class. We're pretty sure he has never been to school before, so he doesn't pick up on the fact that he is in trouble.

    Thankfully I have a lot of support. Goes along with having a lot of SpEd and Title I kiddos, as well as a few ESL. The kids had a math test today and the Title I teacher pulled him out so the rest of the class could take the test.
     
  12. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Sep 27, 2013

    Neat idea, I don't remember this. Gonna have to go find my book...
     
  13. Tutor

    Tutor Comrade

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    Oct 1, 2013

    We have a student like that in our school and he has been in school before! Sounds like this kiddo needs some social stories to explain to him what he should be doing. Maybe you can find some time to spend a few minutes with him and explicitly explain what you expect and model it. Definitely put in place some rewards for his appropriate behavior as well. We have a teacher who uses the clips and they work GREAT! This kiddo may need just two clips, red and green. Discuss with him what red choices are and what green choices are. If he really doesn't know, you have to teach him that too. :)
     
  14. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Oct 1, 2013

    ReadingRules... I had something like this with a first grader. We had a sheet (I believe part of IEP or something counselor came up with) that he had to fill out and I had to fill out. It was basic smiley, straight & sad face. They set it up with mom that if he had 3 smiley's he was rewarded at home, at school he would get to do a job...ie mail or something. Sorry it's been awhile.
     
  15. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Oct 1, 2013

    So I definitely think you're in crisis mode with him (obviously). Combine that with the fact that you're LTS (but still short-term relatively), and his placement will change soon, and you're probably just looking at some crisis management strategies to get through the next few weeks. I think the ideas to get deeper and build more sustainable behavior (e.g., social stories) are good, but probably beyond the scope of what you're going to be able to do.

    I would start with continuing that conversation with the class about his behavior, but I would add that you will give consequences if they look at, smile at, laugh at, or otherwise acknowledge any misbehavior by any student, including Marvin. Practice that with them, and get them to the point where they can act like nothing is happening. That should at least take some of the initial motivation out of his behavior, and is something that is relatively easy to implement. (Only problem is that if he doesn't get laughs, he may escalate his behavior to getting other forms of negative attention, such as hitting. If that happens, stay in touch and we can process :) ).

    Second, and really the more important strategy, I would drop all academic and social expectations for the short-term until you can figure something out. Find something he loves to do (e.g., play on the computer), and just let him do that all day (or the times when you know things will be problematic). If you don't know what he likes to do, take him with another child (who is well-behaved) in your room during lunch or related arts/specials time and just play - figure out what he gravitates to, and what will hold his attention. Gather a list of 3-5 things he loves, then let him have free choice with those activities - literally all day from when he comes in until he leaves, unless there are class activities he has shown he can participate in.

    THEN, if you want, gradually introduce class/social/academic expectations very slowly and with substantial reward (e.g., I'd like you to try to do this activity for 45 seconds, then you can go back and play). Also, introduce VERY EASY expectations (e.g., asking him to do 2 math problems that are as easy as literally 1+1), with the idea of building success.

    The only issue with part II of my suggestion is that if he is really motivated to be in the group, then he may continue to disrupt from wherever he is at the preferred activity.

    A more escalated form of intervention would be doing the above, but implementing a step-wise time out procedure that involves escalating stages of time out (starting at back of the room, then by the door, then in another teacher's class, then the front office). The first step (e.g., back of the room) is a "cool off" period, but for every minute spent in steps 2 and up, he must pay back during preferred time later. If he flat out refuses to comply with step 1 or additional steps, he immediately goes to step 4 (office). The idea here is that he learns to comply with earlier steps in the sequence because later steps have more consequences. The BIG issue with this is that you need amazingly consistent admin support - Step 4 needs to always happen, not just when convenient to admin.

    Thoughts on any of this?
     
  16. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I am an LTS, but it is a 12 week position. 11 weeks left, so there is not really just getting by.

    A few updates: after yelling all day yesterday (to try and teach over top of his antics), I decided that will not work. Duh. I'm sick and medicated, so I apparently wasn't thinking clearly.

    I called home yesterday. The inappropriate gestures have stopped. Including but not limited to 'twerking'. We moved his seat to the back corner. We started a sticker chart for him to earn some incentives. He is constantly drumming on things and he can play the piano. His parents are both musicians, so I tried to bribe him with extra music time. It hasn't worked yet. Today alone, I had SIX adults in my room (at separate times) trying to work with him. He doesn't even work in an 1:1 setting. He still acts out. I'm serious- he could literally have a one-to-one with him at all times and he'd still be a behavior issue.
    I plan on meeting with the P tomorrow to ask for some help. Nothing I've tried has worked. I had a phone call yesterday afternoon from a parent complaining about Marvin. The P also had a phone call from a different parent. Same story- he calls them names and pushes them. *sigh*

    I began documenting. I average 5-6 pages PER DAY! Hopefully we can fast track him into a situation suited for him.
     
  17. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Oct 2, 2013

    giraffe326, I think I'd still stick with my suggestions even with 11 weeks left. The basic philosophy is that you drop expectations until you get good behavior, then you can build up from there. Also throwing in the stepwise time out procedure if admin is supportive.
     
  18. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Actually, today was better. Not great, but better. I think he went 15 minutes at his seat quietly two times. Maybe 5-10 minutes for a third time. Prior to today, I didn't even get 2 minutes.
    Now was he working? Nope. Sure wasn't. But that isn't even a battle I'm going to tackle at the time.

    Outside of those lulls, the twerking reappeared at lunch and he hit a child at recess. He went around putting tape in people's hair. Pulled a girl's hair. Other than that, his behaviors were less extreme.
    The class did a whole lot better ignoring him, too. I definitely need to get some tattling lessons in. It is super hard because the MEAP (Michigan's standardized test) is next week.
     
  19. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Oh, and I had another parent contact me and complain. *sigh*
     
  20. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Hey, that's an improvement - what do you think was responsible for the improvement?
     
  21. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    The class doing better at ignoring him. I think. The class was spot on and didn't give into his antics. I've been working on this for a while, but apparently it finally clicked with them. Yay!
     
  22. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Oct 2, 2013

    That's awesome :)
     

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