Student Accountability

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by pwhatley, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 27, 2010

    Please share your ideas for "end-products" that students can complete at centers, literacy or math, other than worksheets. Do you think completing a word search would count? How about writing down all of the (real) words you complete in a "Making Words" activity? My kids generally LOVE going to my classroom library or doing D.E.A.R., but especially in the beginning of the year, how do I ensure that they can follow directions for completing a response form? Yes, last year was a true blessing, but I'm still working to improve, so any ideas/advice are welcome!
     
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  3. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jun 28, 2010

    This is probably not what you are looking for but...I was lucky enough to be able to attend Debbie Diller's training last year and she emphasizes her lack of belief in products. That workstations are practice (like when Serena is practicing on the tennis ball machine-is she keeping score? no, it's just practice). I usually have one activity that has something written down (usually the writing station). How do you know they completed the worksheets themselves anyway-if they are working with a group?

    I use a lot of dry erase boards, chalkboards-things where they are writing down answers but not for me, for themselves. I'm watching to make sure they are on-task and not making "cookies" with the letter tiles. If I wanted them to complete a response form I would do DEAR time with the whole class and give them time to complete it at their seats. But that's just me! :)
     
  4. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jun 28, 2010

    I have the same outlook as KinderCowgirl. Mine don't really have recording sheets...
    Mine are responsible (which is really my responsibility) for understanding the purpose of the station and are ready to explain what they are doing and why they are doing it to anyone who may walk in the room.
    I also have share time at the end where I randomly choose a student or two to share how they challenged themselves at a station.
     
  5. meltua

    meltua Rookie

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    Jun 28, 2010

    I am planning on having the kids keep a spiral notebook for work stations. I think I will have them write down the words they build at making words. At read to buddy, self, and listening I may just have them write the titles of the books they read or write about their favorite part. As I introduce graphic organizers in mini lessons I will provide copies for them to use during or after reading or listening to a book, but the organizers will be added a little at a time throughout the year.
    So I'm thinking at the end of stations they can just open the notebooks on their desks and I can glance around the room quickly to check.
    What do you guys think?
     
  6. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 28, 2010

    I'm sorry to be so dense, y'all. I don't know if I'm even asking the right questions, so bear with me. My P and our Reading Specialist really like the idea of an end product at most centers/stations. I don't see how they are necessary for most, but I also consider things like a word find (my kids love them) as a product.

    Also, while I really try to be "with-it" during rotations, and am constantly scanning for good/bad behavior, work ethics, etc., I'm (always) trying to improve classroom management, because it increases student learning (and decreases teacher stress :whistle:). Also, my P (an ex-military man and in some ways, VERY old-school, which is not always bad in our school's neighborhood) has given the school the goal of 100% student engagement. I find that it is difficult to ensure that all students who are not at the teacher table are 100% engaged in the activities. It seems as if there are always 1 or 2 who would rather: make paper airplanes, talk on pretend cell phones, make faces/throw signs at classmates, write on their desks, sing in the bathroom, etc. What are some ways I can help my babies (in August) better become "students," and hopefully earlier in the year?
     
  7. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jun 28, 2010

    This is where I apply some of the Daily 5 strategies... during the beginning of the year, you are not doing guided reading yet. So, as they are just beginning stations, you are getting management under control. Work on building stamina and start off stations with just a little bit of time, and slowly add more time each day. The minute someone is off task, bring them to the carpet and go over the behaviors and try again. Have those immature kids be the ones to demonstrate what NOT to do during station time whenever you meet back at the carpet.

    As for end products...
    -the making words and writing all the words they made sounds good.
    -I'm not so sure what the word search is... are they making it or just looking for words? At my word work station it is basically what we've already done in word study whole group. I just move it to the station.
    -Library - could they just write down the title of the book they read and circle if they like it or not?
    -Listening - illustrate your favorite part..(later can be more challenging)

    I don't really know what stations you have, so I guess its hard to offer ideas.
     
  8. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 28, 2010

    My stations vary (and I'm working on increasing the number of stations next year), but always include the teacher table and computer rotation. I'm really interested in the way teachers handle 8/10 stations. Do they change daily or weekly with the lesson? How often do the students visit each station? Do you do "May do" and "Must do?" How do you differentiate each station? Do you have three/four different activities at each station? My class last year had four groups, and we generally had 4 stations/centers, and the groups (homogeneous) rotated together. I'd like to change to only having homogeneous groups at my table, but have no idea how it works. I know, I'm dense - it takes me a lot to really get it.
     
  9. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 28, 2010

    Oh, and we have lots of problems incorporating science, social studies, and health into our schedule, so I think I'd really like to add stations for those as well, so that my students have greater exposure!
     
  10. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jun 28, 2010

    Many of my stations are working on the same objective-the activities just change. So if my kids are working on fluency-they have the word lists and timer and time themselves reading. The next week it's a different list of words but the same activity. Listening center, big book-just changing out the materials. Now if I introduce something like compound words, I will add activities for them to practice those. I try to vary the activities from day to day but will pull out ones they've done before for review. So Monday and Tuesday they usually don't have exactly the same activities, but might do them later on in the week. Does that make sense?

    I do differentiate at each station because I have very advanced kids down to ones that still struggle. They have 3 options so, for example, I have a chart with the alphabet and words for them to alphabetize. One is just word cards, one is picture cards (so they have to determine the sound, then alphabetize) and the 3rd are blank-they make up their own words then alphabetize. I challenge my kids to challenge themselves-they do the activity they want to do (I don't want to make a big deal out of levels) but typically they are doing something on their level. If it's too easy, then they are still getting some sort of practice.

    As for your products-you want it to be something that shows they are applying what they are learning-not just busywork. I had to talk my admin into understanding that products just don't work with workstations. Some kids take forever just to write a line and that's time they could have been using with something hands-on. Plus you never know if they did the work themselves or with their group so you can't really "grade" it. I can e-mail you my record that the kids use-they color in a square when they've finished an activity.

    And you are not dense by any means. Honestly, I do different things with different classes-some are able to be more independent than others.
     
  11. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 28, 2010

    Kinder - thanks! I hope lots of people respond to this thread - I'm learning so much!
     

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