struggling with selectively mute student

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by FourSquare, Jul 5, 2013.

  1. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    I am looping with a student of mine who is selectively mute. I am trying to reflect on how to be a better teacher for this student. My classes are often very discussion based, and naturally s/he is not excelling in this area. Problem is, s/he doesn't want to (or can't?) write or draw for me either. It's been very difficult assessing this student.

    We had an argument at this student's IEP meeting over whether s/he should be evaluated as Cognitively Delayed versus Learning Disabled. The case manager and I argued CD based on this student's Wechsler data:

    Verbal Comprehension Composite=63
    Perceptual Reasoning Composite=71
    Working Memory=77
    Processing Speed=78
    Full Scale Composite=65

    However, the psychologist argued that s/he was making some academic progress and due to that s/he should keep the LD label. :)|) S/he has 2 younger siblings, both in Special Ed. One is diagnosed selectively mute and the other is extremely quiet...the whole family is very low and shy. :huh:

    Regardless of how we classify this student, what are some strategies I can use to increase engagement? I never really know what is a verbal processing issue and what is a motivation issue with this student. S/he is awkward, but seems to interact fairly normally on the playground, at lunch, etc. I am often frustrated thinking s/he just doesn't want to do any work. But I don't want to be THAT teacher. :(

    Help me understand!
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    I had a girl with selective mutism -- and I taught her mother how to do the reading assessments and had her do it at home. The child would talk to her mother, especially when she was safe at home.

    She was actually a very good reader.
     
  4. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Can she point to things for you? Take a quizzes on the computer instead? Maybe make things on the computer?

    ...I swear psychologists are more of a hindrance in IEP/ETR meetings sometimes. I think you have a very valid case for CD.
     
  5. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    S/he has had computer assessments. S/he is always the last one to finish, which is fine, except it's not because s/he is focused. It takes quite a long time for this student to read or type, even with a scribe. We have tried working with this student to organize their thinking, but it has proven only mildly successful.

    S/he took FOUR HOURS on the state test. I was really rooting for this student. I said "I so love your perseverance!" I insisted s/he take a break, get water frequently, pause every once in a while, but s/he was just so determined. And s/he failed both tests. :(

    Interestingly, s/he has some good coping skills. S/he always comes up to me to make sure s/he wrote homework down correctly. S/he comes to before school tutoring...but even one on one I cannot seem to engage this student for long. At best I get very simple mumbled sentences...or simple written sentences...mostly nothing.

    In some ways s/he is "with it" so much more than my other CD students....in that regard I sort of understand the psychologist's argument. But the psychologist has grossly overstated this student's academic progress. S/he made the least progress in my entire class.

    I wish I could crack this puzzle! :eek:hmy:
     
  6. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Could this student read to a dog? There is a program in this area where kids read to dogs. Many of these kids have speech issues and/or confidence and clam up during class but have little problem opening up to Rover. A spin-off is some teachers using stuffed animals as the "audience" and each student reads to (or teaches) his/her Kermit as the teacher walks around and monitors.
     
  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Could you use response cards with him/her? I guess that would only work when you are giving answer choices....

    In my state, 65 is definitely an intellectual/cognitive disability. LD wouldn't even be considered.
     
  8. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Get the speech pathologist involved and start introducing some augmentive communication devices to see which one would work.
     
  9. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    I've taught a mild/moderate cognitive delay (with a few students with severe cog. delays) class for 6 years. All of my students make academic progress, so would your psych. tell me they are LD?!:dizzy:

    Is there more funding for LD students?
     
  10. bros

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    I'm wondering why the student was given a verbal IQ test when a nonverbal IQ test would give an accurate portrayal of the student.
     
  11. Proud2BATeacher

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    I'm assuming she felt comfortable with the psychologist and was able to verbally respond to the questions.

    She also gets some of her work scribed, so she does speak.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    If you don't trust her conclusions why would you assume that she gave the appropriate test or that she was capable of determining if the assessment was accurate?

    Also, the numbers you gave don't seem to add up. The Full Scale seems a bit low.
     
  13. bros

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    That's what I was thinking.

    Look at how high the nonverbals are in comparison to the verbals.

    It honestly seems like the psych should've done a nonverbal IQ test as the area of disability involves speaking, which the Weschler IQ tests rely heavily on for even the nonverbal portions
     
  14. EdEd

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    Composite doesn't seem all that low - keep in mind that working memory & processing speed are subscores (not separate scales) so trying to average all 4 and coming up with a FSIQ isn't how it works. Even if you averaged the verbal/nonverbal scores you'd be right around that area of the stated FSIQ.

    Given that, bros brings up a very valid point that - given the student's lack of use of verbal skills - a nonverbal might have made more sense. Looking at the PR score of 71, I'm not surprised about the hesitance to move in toward the CD category since that is a much, much more stigmatizing diagnosis. Especially given that there seem to be some behavioral issues involved, which - if resolved - might have resulted in higher scores and higher performance (including adaptive performance), I would be very hesitant in that area.

    Still, as you pointed out FourSquare, the real question is what strategies will be used with the student, as placement won't change interventions (just possible availability of them). Unfortunately, we probably don't have enough to base strategies just knowing the IQ scores and that the student is selectively mute. My general next steps, though, would be to find out more information about why the student is selectively mute, probably starting with an FBA (actual FBA, not FBA meeting where school folks sit around and guess what the ABCs & functions are). I would also ask the school psychologist (and possibly counselor) to follow up with some more in-depth behavioral assessment.
     
  15. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    What kind of work is the student willing to do?

    Three ideas that pop to mind...for science and social studies ideas you could provide the student scrambled sentences with a few extra nouns or verbs that would make sense. Then the student must make a sentence using the words provided to answer questions.
    For some discussion based topics, you could provide the student with two colors. When the student agrees with another student, they could hold up the green paper (I agree). When the student does not agree they could hold up the other color (I do not agree).
    Another strategy that has worked well for me is the think-pair-share strategy. I was able to listen in on the conversation that the student would have with a peer. Or the student was willing to share what the peer would say in their discussion with the class.
     
  16. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Yeahhhh....our assessment team is a little....questionable. I just had the OT lady kick one of my kids out of services cause she insisted this student could write in cursive. :)eek:) I work with this student EVERY DAY and s/he can barely print. The student's handwriting is on par with mid first-grade at best. I had writing samples! I insisted to see the assessment and she hemmed and hawed and admitted this was data from 3rd grade and that she did not feel s/he would benefit from continued services so she would not be re-evaluating this student in 6th. :dizzy:

    We have a suspicious number of students who start losing out of classroom services when they get to middle school....my theory is that they a)Don't want to work with older kids or B)Are pouring limited resources into primary. Not legal or ethical but...welcome to Chicago Public Schools!

    Anyway....I just got confirmation that we could do a special eval on him at the beginning of this year. I'm going to ask specifically for more resources on selective mutism and re-advocate for a CD label. At the time of his meeting I was (and still am, really) a very new SPED teacher and I didn't know what to say. :(

    I'd like to revisit talking to Mom too. I feel like she and I have a good relationship. Maybe I have underestimated her as a resource. I am suspicious that all of her children have such struggles with speaking. Does selective mutism run in families? :unsure: It's my understanding that it is psychological in nature. I feel like we should be helping them find counseling if this is the case.

    These are all things I never think to ask DURING the meetings. :mad: Our assessment team is very intimidating and doesn't like to explain things. If they make me nervous I can't imagine what my parents feel like. :|
     
  17. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Great as always, mopar. Thanks much. I love these and have not tried them outside of TPS. S/he has made a little progress in that area, but is inconsistent. I have always put this student with patient partners...some s/he talks briefly, sometimes s/he doesn't. Sometimes attempts independent work, sometimes doesn't...regardless of what kind of work it is.

    EdEd, I just saw your post. Can you tell me more about this?:

    Would we see all 60s if this were true CD? I need to learn more about this data and how it is interpreted. If you have any good books or web sites please share.
     
  18. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Not necessarily. About a quarter of my students have a big discrepancy between verbal and nonverbal scores -- this is probably why I am not up in arm about the results as compared to other AtoZers.

    Has the SLP assessed her? How are her receptive language skills?

    It seems a lot of AtoZers are questioning the results. From working with her in class, do you think they are or are not representative of her classroom performance? I know my students score lower than I will expect in some subtests but I have to remember that I do a lot of explaining, scaffolding and reteaching when I work with them in class and this doesn't happen during testing. How can she work with a scribe if she doesn't speak? How much and when does she speak?

    I had one student with severe apraxia this year and we were considering testing him but decided against it. The psychologist thought that only one nonverbal assessment was worthy of using and she wanted my student to be exposed to more skills before testing him as she did not want an invalid test because the test could only be administered once every 3 years and
     
  19. Proud2BATeacher

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    :eek:hmy: This is one reason why it is important to talk to therapists after therapy sessions to find out specifically what they are working on with your students. I also make a point of asking for suggestions and materials I can use to help my students during class so that I could provide feedback to the therapists. I know that I have had students make little or no improvement after working with a therapist for 3+ years and they have chosen to discontinue services -- I agreed as other students would have a chance to receive services. I just wrote in my IEPs for the teacher to reevaluate this student's progress for a year or two for improvement in order to determine if therapy sessions will be beneficial.
     
  20. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I had a similar situation here. Our OT told me that she is keeping one of my students for one more year. If he doesn't show progress, she is dropping him from services at his next IEP. Her reasoning is that his handwriting isn't improving across settings. He can write just fine for her in therapy, when he wants to, but he continues to use poor handwriting in my classroom and the regular classroom. She said she could keep him on her caseload anyway, but we have to balance the pros and cons of that over what he is missing from the other classrooms during therapy time. In the end, it's probably better for him to be in class than in therapy.


    Same here... sorta. Those scores didn't seem all that odd to me, as others suggested, but then again, I'm also still pretty new at this, too. The difference here, though, is that our assessment teams don't attend meetings, except in rare cases. So, I have to explain the results of the testing and pretend that I actually know what I'm talking about. When we get a question from a parent or classroom teacher, the rest of us just look at each other in hopes that someone else will start to blabber off something that sounds like it makes sense. Usually someone comes through, thankfully! I would definitely like to learn more!
     
  21. Proud2BATeacher

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    FourSquare, try googling WISC-R and look up a site that explains the results. I'm also sure that your psychologist should be able to provide you with the info. (if necessary cc. your principal when requesting the info.
     
  22. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Can you give her little notecards to start? I had a student with the same problems. During a discussion she started off with a simple card she could hold up that said "I agree" or "I disagree." At first I would have to bring her into the conversation by saying, "Sally, how do you feel about what Tommy said?" And she would agree or disagree. Eventually she would offer to agree or disagree on her own. Then I gradually added more response phrases and took away, "I agree" and "I disagree" because she was feeling comfortable enough to say those rather than hold up the card. It took me until almost the end of the school year to think of this, so it didn't progress much further than that. Had I started it in September I think she would have made more progress.

    It might also help to start something like this during small group instruction first. My student was much more comfortable speaking in a group of 4 or 5 students who were closer to her academic level than to the entire class. (Although I know you have much fewer students than I do.)
     
  23. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I think the first thing to keep in mind is that CD isn't really a unique "diagnosis," but a just a low point on the spectrum of intelligence. So, with cancer as an example, you have it or you don't. Same with pregnancy - you either are or you're not :). With CD, that just means the child is low enough on the intelligence spectrum (as measured by certain tests) that the government has decided to pay more money for services, to put it crudely. :)

    Typically, though, because of hos stigmatizing the CD/EMH/MR (whatever it's called in various states) is, most folks want to be really, really certain that it's not on the border. So, generally if there are any scores at all above 70 the child won't qualify. Part of this is that legally this has to be the case as well.

    This is a large reason, on a side note, that many kids in the low 70s don't qualify for services and are labeled "slow learners" - their achievement scores often aren't low enough (e.g., 25 points lower) that they qualify for LD, nor do they necessarily have a "processing deficit" that is significantly lower than FSIQ that can be identifying as the "cause" of the LD. This is a big reason (among others) why RtI has become so big - kids with 71 FSIQ but who don't qualify for any other services would qualify if they needed extra help. In other words, extra help isn't dependent on falling into a category - just being in need.
     
  24. EdEd

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    Oh, and in terms of books I really don't have any great references as this is really a policy and procedural issue as opposed to theoretical. There probably are a few good books on special ed identification that are out there, but I might start with some of the RtI resource websites out there and read some of their concept papers. Maybe reading some wiki articles about it as well. In the RtI domain, you'd search for RtI vs. a "discrepancy" model. In terms of the CD issue, I'm not sure I have any great readings unfortunately.

    Really, each district should have an eligibility checklist and set of procedures - I'd get my hands on all of that documentation (whoever runs your eligibility meetings should have all of that), then make your way through and internet search any concepts/terms that are unfamiliar. I'd be happy to share any info I have as well if you come across something that you don't know.
     
  25. EdEd

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    Oh, and one more comment on the scores - typically, the scoring software will be able to indicate if any of the composite scores are statistically significantly different from each other. I would be highly surprised if that were the case given only an 8 point split between VC/PR. What that means, other than any clinical interpretations, is that the psychologist would have a hard time arguing for only using 1 of the scores (and not including the other, or using FSIQ) in terms of qualification. If PR were, say, 20 points higher, there may be more of an argument that VC isn't representative of the child's overall IQ, and the team could possibly use PR as a standalone score (vs FSIQ) when computing discrepancy formulas. Similarly, the reverse argument would be true - if there is not a statistically significant split, it would be hard to use that 71 PR score as a means of disqualifying for CD, as opposed to using the FSIQ in the 60s. I know this sort of goes against what I was saying before, but I think bros is right - given the extremely limited verbal skills and the fact that there IS a split (even if not statistically significant) would probably warrant follow up assessment using a nonverbal measure such as the TONI. If the TONI came back above 70 that would clearly rule out CD is my opinion, but if it came back in the 60s (along with other scores such as adaptive) that would further support moving in the CD direction.

    All, again, depends on the rules and nuances of the district.
     
  26. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    You've just summed up one of my biggest sources of frustration!!

    So, legally-speaking, if we had a kid with a FSIQ of 69 and the other scores ranged from mid-60's to low 80's, we should not have gone with an ID/CD/MR/MH identification? :unsure:
     
  27. EdEd

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    Mine too :)

    What other scores are you referring to?

    In general, legally speaking it probably goes by district. I could be wrong about this (e.g., there may be case law which speaks to this), but each state/district can determine rules, so legally speaking you'd be bound by whatever rules you have there. Also, in general I think most folks legally get in trouble by denying services when a parent wants them, so if you're offering services (and the parent is on board) I think legally you'd be fine. In terms of having "violated the law," it would be based on whatever procedures are in your district. I'm not sure I know the nuances enough to speak well about this.

    My own personal viewpoint, though, would be this: when you have composite scores that are statistically significantly different, and one ore more are above 70, even if the FSIQ is below 70, that would raise a question in my mind. I'm not saying I wouldn't support qualification, but it would give make me think about the situation.

    In general, though, I'll say this: my own viewpoint almost always supports what's best for the child - what services fit the child, and not just in the present, but considering the impact that my vote will have on the child's life in 5-10 years. I personally don't care if a child has a FSIQ of 65, 70, 75, or 110. If the child needs services, they need services. But, the stigma of CD/MR would weigh heavily in that equation. All of this again points back to the importance of RtI.
     
  28. bella84

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    The WISC-IV index scores. Sorry, I should have been more clear about that.

    Agreed. That's why we went with it. Otherwise this child wouldn't have qualified for anything, and services were CLEARLY needed.
     
  29. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    This is interesting. I found this on the web site of another Illinois district talking about SPED qualifications:

    Cognitive Disability

    Significantly sub average intellectual functioning, an IQ of 69 or below on an individually administered intelligence test and concurrent deficits in adaptive behavior evaluated according to developmental age. Onset must be before the age of 18.

    Levels of Cognitive Disability:

    Mild IQ level 50-55 to 69
    Moderate IQ level 35-40 to 50-55
    Severe IQ level 20-25 to 35-40
    Profound IQ level below 20-25


    Learning Disabilities

    Average or above IQ (85 or above) on an individually administered intelligence test, a significant discrepancy between measured ability and achievement (1.5-2.0 standard deviations) and demonstration of a processing skill deficit.




    So am I servicing a bunch of LD kids that shouldn't really be LD? :unsure: I only have 1 kid with an IQ over 85. Most of them are in the 70s. But these kids don't qualify for CD cause their FSIQ is not 69 or below? I see what you mean about the gap then...what are we doing for kids 70-85? I'm glad my school put them with me. They would die in Gen Ed full time.
     
  30. bella84

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    That's precisely the problem we see over and over again in my district. We could probably have two more full-time sped positions open up if we qualified all the kids that fall in that "gap" range. So sad. :(
     
  31. chicagoturtle

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    I think the "functioning as they are able" is going to become a lot more prevalent moving forward. Because you know, RTI should be solving that....

    This is available at the Chicago Public Library. They only have one copy, but it is not checked out. I didn't read it cover to cover, but have partially read it and remember it being slightly helpful.

    http://www.amazon.com/Helping-Children-Selective-Mutism-Parents/dp/0195394542/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_z

    True Selective Mutism is an anxiety disorder. Is Social Work involved or Psych involved on the IEP and providing services?
     
  32. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Bingo - you'd be the poster person for RtI :). I haven't worked in a state yet where they cap IQ for LD. Now, if you work in Illinois and you are placing kids in LD with IQ below 85 I suppose you're breaking the rules unless they have a clause whereby the team can overrule the eligibility criteria if they feel so.
     
  33. EdEd

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    Yeah, I think in that case my comments before would apply. Generally, here's how scores work: you take the largest/most aggregate score because that generally has the most reliability/validity. In this case that's the FSIQ. If your next lower scores are statistically significantly different, though, that throws into question the validity of the overall FSIQ as being representative of overall IQ. It doesn't invalidate the FSIQ, but it would call into question what the score actually represents. It also opens up the possibility of using one of the composites in place of the FSIQ. I've seen that done anyway - e.g., looking at discrepancy between reading and VC composite even when VC & PR aren't significantly different, but when you use a composite in place of the FSIQ you are working with a score that has less reliability/validity. Then again, the very concept of IQ in general has been called into question, but that's a different discussion.

    So, to answer your question specifically, if you had a few composites above 70 but none were statistically significantly different, and your FSIQ was - say - 68 (along with your adaptive), I think you'd be within reason to justify CD. Others may disagree with me here, and I could understand that. If FSIQ were 68, but VC was 58 and PR was 82, I think you'd be on much more shaky ground because there is a significant possibility that the 68 FSIQ doesn't really represent the child's actual level of intellectual functioning.

    I feel bad making any post without beating this dead horse: this is all just a means of obtaining financial assistance from the government. 70 is not a magic number, and kids who score at 68 aren't qualitatively different from kids who score at 72 just because of those scores. So, whether or not something is "wrong" is matter of whether we're talking district regulations, federal policy, student need, etc. It may be "wrong" to qualify a child according to district policy, but quite acceptable under federal policy and needs of a child. It's all relative to where you are. The bottom line is that if you are supported by your superiors, not knowingly violating any regulations, and working in the best interest of the child, I wouldn't worry about it. :)
     
  34. bros

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    If you are offering services to the parent, it is fine, as long as you aren't going "Johnny can only get Speech Therapy if he has a speech disability"

    I'd be interested in seeing the subtest scores - if they are a huge scatter, then it is bringing something to light - what that is is difficult to determine, could be a variety of things, all depending on the student
     
  35. FourSquare

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    My kids were all placed in Special Ed long before RTI was even a Thing at my school.

    So...theoretically...if my kids were being initially evaluated today, they would end up sitting in Tier 3 because of their too high IQ scores? What if they weren't making progress? And how much progress do you need to make before we quit RTI and stick you in SPED? Is there a time limit? My school has never really been able to answer these questions cause I don't even think we have a clear system. :whistle: I should probably join that committee. :huh:
     
  36. FourSquare

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    Do you mean this?

    Wechsler Intelligence Scales For Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV)

    Verbal Comprehension Scaled Score
    Similarities 4
    Vocabulary 4
    Comprehension 3

    Perceptual Reasoning Scaled Score
    Block Design 8
    Picture Concepts 3
    Matrix Reasoning 5

    Working Memory Scaled Score
    Digit Span 6
    Arithmetic 6

    Processing Speed Scaled Score
    Coding 5
    Symbol Search 7

    Verbal Comprehension Composite=63
    Perceptual Reasoning Composite=71
    Working Memory=77
    Processing Speed=78
    Full Scale Composite=65
     
  37. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 8, 2013

    Agreed.

    Definitely - more data is generally helpful when problem-solving a particular situation. In terms of classifying for purposes of SPED, though, it's really a "yes or no" kind of situation. Sadly, many eligibility teams don't really go beyond answering that specific question (and listing some boilerplate interventions), but ideally yes - it would be potentially interesting/helpful, again - withholding conversation of usefulness of IQ scores more generally.
     
  38. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 8, 2013

    Lol you should! Sounds like you're at least asking the right questions. The "best practice" answer is that kids should never sit in a "tier" if it's not useful, but should give interventions in that tier reasonable time to work. Some districts spell out specific amounts of time the child should stay in a tier. I prefer to make the decision on an individual basis - setting a specific time that the team will reconvene, with communication occurring between meetings and the case manager/SPED teacher constantly reviewing data informing the team if more immediate action needs to take place, along with making minor adjustments throughout the process.

    My thoughts specifically:

    IQ scores wouldn't even come into play. A child would stay in a tier as long as it were beneficial, and wouldn't be stopped in a tier that was ineffective because of IQ scores.

    The child would be moved to the next tier that would make sense. It's also important that a child not just be moved from tier 1 to 2 to 3 etc. if that's not what makes sense. Let's say you have a child with severe autism - it may not make sense to begin with Tier II interventions, so that child may be immediately moved to Tier IV (formal SPED) in a self-contained room. Let's say after 3 years the team wants to try a hybrid III/IV situation where the child receives elements of both services, with part of the day in an inclusion setting. Nothing wrong with going backward either.

    The key here is flexibility. No child should get stuck in a setting that is too high or too low. If done well, the benefit of RtI is that it isn't as "sticky" as SPED - a team should be more easily able to move between levels of service.

    Technically RtI includes SPED in those schools, although colloquially folks refer to it as being different, funding tends to be different. But, conceptually, RtI includes every service in the school - from general education with no supplemental support to the most restrictive SPED settings.

    That aside, my preferred method of evaluating progress is through a "dual discrepancy" model (NOT "severe discrepancy") in which the team evaluates both rate of progress and amount of discrepancy between the target child and peer group. If the current service setting is not closing that gap by increasing the rate of progress so that it's higher than peer group progress (after a reasonable amount of time), the intervention probably needs to be changed.

    Some districts create specific cut scores with either rate or absolute level of performance below which constitutes lack of progress after a certain number of weeks. That could be based on either criterion- or norm-referenced cut scores. So, it could be that Tier II eligibility is based on performance on initial year's screening assessment below the 20th %ile. With each child that is still below the 20th %ile with insufficient rate of progress (e.g., was at 8th %ile and is now at 9th %ile) after the first 9 weeks, the team meets individually about the student and makes a decision about moving to Tier III services.

    Yes and no. Yes, the team wouldn't want to wait more than a "reasonable" amount of time, but probably shouldn't be boxed in to moving too fast if the team feels the current service level might still work with modifications. Not saying districts don't put time limits on tiers, but I don't necessarily support them.
     
  39. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jul 8, 2013

    Fascinating!

    I am very frustrated with RTI at my school. I feel the Tier 3 interventions are not very good and sometimes inconsistent. We have kids getting pulled for this all year...once or twice a week...with no clear criteria regarding when they should be evaluated. We evaluated and qualified FIVE 6th graders last year for SPED...after they suffered all year in RTI. This was me watching their little small group work in the hallway:

    :banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:

    When they said I would be getting a couple of them I was like "WELL, DUH! I could have told you that in October."
     
  40. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 8, 2013

    Yeah, sounds like you need to join the committee!
     
  41. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jul 9, 2013

    The VCI subscores and the Picture Concepts scores are very telling to me.

    Especially since Picture Concepts is untimed.

    Picture Concepts is a test where students are asked to look at 2-3 rows of pictures (of objects), and point to the one picture from each row that shares a characteristic in common with the pictures from the other rows.

    The VCI subscores are telling me that the student clearly has issues with verbal tasks, but they are alright with nonverbal tasks (as shown in the Block Design and Symbol Search subtests).

    The low Picture Concept score tells me that the student has issues with abstract thinking - but that may be a side effect of the selective mutism.

    This just furthers my thinking that a nonverbal IQ test would benefit the student, at least to get a more accurate picture of the student.
     

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