Strange Student

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by mudpie1598, Jan 29, 2008.

  1. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Jan 29, 2008

    Hi,

    I have a student who has repeated Kinder and decided to place her in my class. She has trouble focusing on the rug. She will tie and untie her shoes. She will rock back and forth. She will play with her hat or her jacket or sweater on the rug. I usually move down her name pin or move her to a seat where she can sit and watch us, but then she'll start to move the chair and she'll start to lay on the chair instead of sitting on it. She has a personal contract, but that has only taken us so far. What are your suggestions? By the way, she already has an SST from the year before. I have not been clued in on her short-term and long-term goals, but have asked the person in charge of the SST's to clue me in ASAP!

    What do you all suggest?
     
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  3. kindernj123

    kindernj123 Companion

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    Jan 29, 2008

    I don't know what a SST is. Is it like an IEP (Individualized Education Plan)? If so, is the child eligible for an aide? Do you have an aide to help her re-focus? If not, perhaps keeping her front and center and prompting her to re-focus is your only hope! You could also try to work out an incentive plan to earn rewards for each period of time she sustains focus. She could earn a trip to a treasure box after a certain amount of rewards have been earned. Good luck.
     
  4. fun2tchk

    fun2tchk Rookie

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    Jan 31, 2008

    Last year our OT person had brought in a milkcrate with one of those large balls inside for one of my youngesters to sit on. I have also used those blue squishy seat cushions before. I am sorry that I don't know the technical terms for them. But a special ed or OT person in your building might have some alternatives such as these.
     
  5. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Jan 31, 2008

    If she is playing with thing (shoelaces, clothing) during circle in a distracting fashion, you may want to give her something small, quiet, and inobtrusive to hold/fidget with. Such as: koosh ball, hair scrunchy (the soft kind), silly putty, small piece of textured fabric--you judge what might be appropriate based on how fidgety she is and what might distract the other kids (also if she's into throwing it, it may not work but it's worth a try). Some kids need to have their hands busy in order to focus.

    As far as seating goes, sometimes a child needs to have their space defined for them to help them to focus--so, sitting on a rug just on the rug can be HARD. Do you use carpet squares for individual children? Giving her a chair. You said moving the chair is a problem--is it possible given your physical space to put her chair with its back to the wall so she can't move it? Anything you can do to take away the options of moving can help her to focus--if she knows she cannot go anywhere, it may help her to stop trying and pay more attention to you.

    Watch her behaviors--can you identify a common denominator, ie what benefit is she getting from her actions? Is it the need to be moving, is it sensory stimulation, is it attention from you, is it avoidance of your activity? What calms her? If you can identify some of this, you may be able to address her behavior more easily.

    And, of course, get your hands on the SST results. . . it sounds like she should be evaluated again. Good luck!
     
  6. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Feb 5, 2008

    SST-Student Success Team, it's before giving the child an IEP. She is front and center, but is unable to. She has an incentive chart at her desk which I give her stickers whenever she does something good or something I asked, but her behavior is very difficult (sorry for using this word.)
     
  7. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Feb 5, 2008

    The last SST states similar behavior issues that are apparent now. The last teacher that had her stated that she lacked attention therefore, acted out in order to get that attention, but it's hard not to say something when she is acting out. She has her own table in the back with her own chair with enough space. That is "her" space. All the other children sit in a group setting of about 6-7 children in round tables. I chose to give her, her own "space." When she's on the rug that when I lose her attention and focus. She will do things like fidget, rock back and forth, play with trash on the carpet (It's one large carpet with masking tape that I placed that defines squares.) she will make noises like yell, whistle, fart (she does this a lot), the kids don't react to her farting anymore they look at her and then proceed with their focusing. Any more suggestions?
     
  8. Oregon Sub Girl

    Oregon Sub Girl Rookie

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    Feb 7, 2008

    What is the child's home life like? Do you know how she is treated there? Does she watch a lot of tv?

    I have found that moving a fidgety child to the front of them room rather than place him/her in the back has helped. That way, they are a more a part of the "action." She/he can see you better and hear you better. Plus, I've found it easier to correct undesirable behavior when I am close to the child where I can whisper the corrections rather than say them loud enough for the whole class to hear. Also, I've found that a light touch on the shoulder or a look in the eye can also correct these behaviors which is also easier to do when the child is seated at your feet.

    These are some things that I have found work. It sounds like this child's behavior is quite extreme however, so maybe they wouldn't work. I wish you the best though.

    My biggest recommendation would be to get as many specialists involved as quickly as possible.
     
  9. kindateach

    kindateach New Member

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    Feb 11, 2008

    sounds like...

    I have had my share of "strange students" in my 20 years of teaching and most of them have been within the last 5 or 6 years. Some of the behaviors you describe send red flags for PDD or the autistic spectrum. Go online to see what you think. Do some research on the topic and document all behaviors. The school psychologist will need to get involved and a medical diagnosis would be needed. It is very difficult for general doctors to diagnose...and many don't pick it up. More hospitals and universities are opening diagnostic centers for these disorders. Good luck...don't give up!
     

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