Story writing

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by PinkLily, May 1, 2005.

  1. PinkLily

    PinkLily Companion

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Messages:
    156
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 1, 2005

    I teach second grade and I am having trouble teaching my students how to write a good story. We have practiced beginning, middle and end, but some kids are still having trouble. How can I help them to add more details to their stories and to write more than 5 sentences? Any advice?
     
  2.  
  3. Lanie

    Lanie Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2003
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 1, 2005

    Have you tried using graphic organizers? There are lots of great graphic organizers on the web. Do you do much interactive writing? Let them see you doing the process with all of their ideas. Also, talk through their story ideas with them before they begin writing them down. Many times they have an idea, they just don't know how to go about organizing all their thoughts. Do you give them a story prompt or do you allow them to write about whatever they want? With my Kindergarteners, we would make lots of charts. We start out with a single chart of who, what where, when (sometimes) and problem(s) and solution(s). Then we would make single sentences that included all of the elements we just put on our chart. On the third chart, we added details to each of the sentences that we had just written. It's much easier for them to grasp the concept if you continually model the writing process with their ideas.
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    May 1, 2005

    Try this - Someone (name a character) wanted something (name a goal) but (name a problem) so (name a resolution). Once you have the outline, have them elaborate on each item.
     
  5. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2005

    I've used these and parts of Step-Up to Writing. Step-Up is a great way for kids to visualize the writing process.
     
  6. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2005

    I have several different story map graphic organizers that my students use to plan out a story before writing. Each map has a place to plan setting, characters, problem, plot (major beginning and middle events) and problem resolution/conclusion. This seems to help them get all parts of a story in mind before starting.
     
  7. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2005

    I use several types of graphic organizers as well, but if you don't use them all the time the students forget about them. You need to be consistent for the students to begin to use them on their own.
     
  8. pamms

    pamms Comrade

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 14, 2005

    follow up questions

    I teach 2nd grade also. I have not had much luck with graphic organizers, some are so complicated, I don't even understand them..lol and some get boring, I have gone back to using 4 square this year, but the kids hate it. One problem I have with organizers is when the kids are ready to move from writing eveything in the organizer to just the 'outline' sort of info. They keep wanting to write everything in the organizer, and it just doesn't fit, so they limit their writing. Have you found a basic organizer for narrative and for expository that work for you?

    Also: What is the "Step-Up to Writing" that you mentioned?

    Thanks!
     
  9. pamms

    pamms Comrade

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 14, 2005

    To get them to add details about a character, I sometimes have the class brainstorm ideas for characters: lion, mouse,king,Joe, etc.... then for some of the ideas I tell them to close their eyes and picture that character, then I ask them to describe what they imagined. I will usually try to 'imagine' the character differently that they may have, ex: lion..I imagine it as a cute a cuddly baby lion. Then they see that everyone imagined it differently and that they have to describe the character if they want the reader to know what they meant.
    This is especially funny to do with a character 'name' that no one knows...they will play along and come up with all kinds of silly ideas!

    :)
     
  10. Maxine

    Maxine Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 16, 2005

    to address the limited space of graphic organizers, it is possible for the students to simply fold the paper in half lengthwise. On the left column, write the main points such a characters' names, setting, problem or adventure that happened, and the ending. These simple entries must skip 5 or 7 lines each. Then, on the left side, they can fill in the details to their hearts' content. This forms a super rough draft that can be proofread by a classmate, then written for submission in the class book or assignment.
     
  11. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 17, 2005

    Graphic Organizers: Or give them a laminated copy and have them use vis-a-vis. This way they can use the organizer over and over again.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TeacherNY,
  2. Missy
Total: 245 (members: 2, guests: 225, robots: 18)
test