Stereotype Game Idea _ Feedback

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by reynf083, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. reynf083

    reynf083 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2014

    Hello,

    I am a student at Parsons The New School for Design in NYC.
    For class, our team is brainstorming on a lesson plan that will
    help teachers and parents casually and effectively discuss gender with their students or children. In these lesson plans, the teacher acts as moderator instead of lecturer.
    The tone is lighthearted and the approach is optimistic, allowing students the freedom to explore their own thoughts and feelings on the subject matter without feeling judged or ashamed about their personal likes, dislikes, and consumption. :)

    A few ideas we had were:

    Activity 1: Talk about toys
    ENTIRE CLASS ** 10 MINUTES
    • Ask the class what their favorite toys are and why. If there is time, arrange an
    anonymous poll the previous day or lesson: ask each child to write down their
    favorite toy and why they like it on a piece of paper and put it in a box.
    • What common ground is there between the genders in their answers? Do answers
    tally with what they said privately?
    • Choose a selection of toys: a doll, a car, a pink toy, a board game, loom bands or
    another topical toy
    • Show to the class and ask them ‘Who is this toy for?’
    • Wait to see if the children respond with ideas of gender
    • If so, ask why they think it’s a girl toy or a boy toy

    Activity 2: Watch film clip on toy stereotypes
    ENTIRE CLASS ** 20 MINUTES
    • Watch a news report on toys, children and/or stereotypes
    • Read some of the comments underneath the film
    Ask the class:
    • What did you think of the film? Do you agree that shops shouldn’t have signs?
    Why or why not?
    • Does labelling toys ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’ put you off playing with them?
    • Write your own comment for the news website. What would you like to say?


    What do you think about these ideas? :) We would love to get some professional feedback!

    Thank you very much!!
     
  2.  
  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 30, 2014

    Are there some standards to which you would link these lesson ideas?

    :2cents:The following questions are leading:
    • Do you agree that shops shouldn’t have signs?
    Why or why not?
    • Does labelling toys ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’ put you off playing with them?

    Overall, I'm not loving the lesson design nor do i like this for kindergarten.
     
  4. reynf083

    reynf083 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2014

    Hello! Thank you for your feedback on this prototype and for the article :) really helpful. Just fyi, Parsons is not only a fashion school. I learn fashion but also design & business.
    We have a project where we need to design guidelines to help teachers teach young boys & girls about gender stereotyping without it being too complex and still fun for them. It does not involve the parents: only teachers & kids. We are thinking of doing it a young age since it becomes harder for older children to change their behavior around these concepts.
     
  5. reynf083

    reynf083 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2014

    Hello! Thank you for your response :) We did quite a few surveys already and many parents or children do not like the way toys are marketed in the US (boy blue vs girl pink). Did you ever see the youtube video 'Riley on Marketing?' We saw it and thought there might be new design opportunities to tackle this issue.
    Also, do you think kindergarten is too young or our approach perhaps too agressive/complicated for them?
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 30, 2014

    Your approach seems biased and somewhat manipulative. The question design doesn't seem to let students 'explore their own thinking', but rather to push them into one way of thinking.
    Are you being required by your school to actually teach this lesson or to just create a lesson?
     
  7. MrsCarr234

    MrsCarr234 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2014

    I think this is an interesting approach to staring a conversation. I am curious to hear how you expect teachers in tern to respond to their students. What are the children going to get out of this when they say a pink toy is for girls. What will you say if a male child says he likes to play with Barbies? I think its a great idea to discuss gender rolls to children but I also think that we should be prepared to answer their questions back. As a Elementary teacher myself I get some interesting questions from my students and its important that I answer in the best way possible. I think you guys have a great start. Think about how you want to answer to the students, and what you want them to get out of it.
     
  8. T4TeacherTilde

    T4TeacherTilde New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 2, 2014

    Great ideas!

    Hello there!
    First of all, this sounds like a very exciting project!
    I find it very important from a very early age to teach all pupils the equality between genders. As previously stated, the questions are a bit too specific for children of kindergarten, but it would be great to try with children a few years older.
    However, I believe, in order to make a change in society, it is essential to discuss such ideas with the children, even in kindergarten. When I watch the kids play in class, girls often turn to dolls whereas boys to legos. However some changes can be seen but unfortunately they are quite one-sided: girls are more pushed to contemplate playing with both traditionally feminine and masculine toys, while young boys are still expected to only play with cars and not with Barbie dolls. In other words, it is very important to teach the children the various opportunities they can get in schools to discover themselves. Maybe we should try reaching to them, through a less formal way (and I would love to take part in!).
    What you are achieving is great! Change of perception over gender is very important for the education of our children! So, thank you very much and I hope my observations have helped you.
    Have a good day!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. josando
Total: 178 (members: 1, guests: 158, robots: 19)
test