Staying positive when the behavior is really negative.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Sarge, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jun 2, 2011

    Our school is adopting the PBIS model next year. I'm totally on board with the idea.

    But I'm really wondering how you stay positive in the following two situations.

    First one: A student does something really egregious like draws on the wall, writes in a book, etc.

    Second one: Student does something not so egregious, but something which it's very, very, very important that they not do. Best example: Talking to a neighbor during a test and compromising the integrity of the test.

    How does a "positive classroom" work in these situations?
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jun 2, 2011

    PBIS doesn't mean you never dole out consequences.
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    For me it's all about understanding that most kids do bad things for better reasons - meaning that they there is some underlying need not being met, or issue going on, which - when discovered and understood - helps me understand that the true reason for the behavior is not usually to hurt others, and even when it might be to hurt others, it's usually because there is some issue going on.

    I've found that when I have an understanding and supportive attitude, that translates into supportive discipline, even when consequences are involved.

    My other thought is that a "positive classroom" isn't positive 100% of the time - ideally, strategies such as reinforcing alternative positive behaviors are tried before punishment, but there's a time and place for punishment, and for kids not being happy, even within a PBIS model.

    Here's an analogy I'm thinking of now: imagine you're trying to get from one place to another and avoid traffic. If you really know your way around the city, you can usually take another route and avoid congested roads. However, no matter how much you try to avoid it, there are times when you're going to get stuck in traffic. However, getting out of traffic as soon as possible is important, and keeping a positive mentality while in traffic, helps make the situation better. Same with behavior - you want to keep positive momentum whenever possible, but there are always going to be situations when you have to use punishment, but get out as soon as possible :).
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 2, 2011

    I would say that you begin by removing the student from the situation and then speaking with the student privately about their behavior. Then you might reteach them what they should do in that situation or have them correct the situation (erase the book or paint the wall).
     
  6. janney

    janney Cohort

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    Jun 2, 2011

    From Classroom Management: Self-Assessment Revised.

    8. I ignored or provided quick, direct, explicit reprimands/redirections in response to inappropriate behavior.

    9. I have multiple strategies/systems in place to acknowledge appropriate behavior (e.g., class point systems, praise, etc.).

    10. In general, I have provided specific feedback in response to social and academic behavior errors and correct responses.


    I'm not an expert on PBIS but it seems to me that it is more about having a clear and consistant plan in place for management and the students understand your plan. Also, your management plan probably can't be just to yell and kick students out for everything.:p
     
  7. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jun 3, 2011

    I think you can be positive even when doling out consequences. Just matter of factly do what you gotta do, move on, and let it go. A choice received a consequence. End of story. Same story may play out all day long over and over, but each time, it's nothing personal- just business. No lectures. No belittling. No yelling. No bringing up past offences.

    I'm not saying it's easy (or even realistic-HA!) but it makes sense in theory.
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 3, 2011

    I agree with these posts. I have a pretty positive classroom climate, but there are certain actions that have specific consequences. I actually just had this happen last week, and I had to write a discipline form to the student, because that's the consequence.

    I have recently switched to a new behavior system, based on one I saw here a while ago. I created an ocean, and my kids each have a fish that represent them. If they make a poor choice, they move one space to the deep water. At the deepest end of the ocean, they are sent home with a discipline form, and lose all of their recess (if they land in the middle of the ocean, they lose 5 minutes of recess). Similarly, they can move closer in the safe water, and if they get to the end of the safe water, they get an award home recognizing them of their great choices.


    As I mentioned, this is new system I am trying, and it is one I saw here (I can't remember who uses it). So, being positive doesn't mean no consequences, but in regards to the specific behavior plan you mention, I am unfamiliar with it, so I am unsure of the details involved.
     
  9. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 3, 2011

    Tami that's exactly what I use with my sixth graders and it works wonders! They want the additional rewards and work for them. The consequences don't seem to matter as much, but they don't want to move down because they truly want to rewards.

    However, I have made it very clear that not all behaviors go through the same stages (and my kids knew which behaviors I meant). Some of them can jump a stage as needed.

    How are your fish attached to the board? I used tacks this year but think I will try magnets next year...
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 3, 2011

    Maybe I got the idea from you then! I made waves out of poster paper (as well as the fish), and I used velcro to attach the fish. I think you (or whoever I got this idea from) actually painted the waves on the wall. I would love to do that next year.

    What rewards do you give? I wasn't quite sure how to do this, and only started it when my behavior chart (I used the color coded system but haven't been too fond of it) disappeared (I usually put things on the wall with sticky tack, but they fall eventually and I suspect the janitor just throws these things away, which I am not happy about).
     
  11. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 3, 2011

    I don't have an ocean theme.....I love the idea of it being right on the wall though!

    My first level of a reward is a classroom ticket (the students use these to buy things in the classroom), the second level is to sit around the room (earning to sit in a comfy place or by a friend or at a back table or even my desk), the third level is a positive note home, and anything above that is a choice board the I have (basically what the students can buy with their classroom tickets but the student can get for free).
     

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