Staying after the kids

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by jen12, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jan 13, 2011

    I got a four-day assignment next week! Yay! Usually when I get any longer than two days, it ends up being in state preschools, but this time it's first grade. Unfortunately, it's at a district where we have to remain for an hour after the kids are out. Even on early-dismissal days, subs have to stay until 3:30, which means three hours of hanging around after my work is done. I know I shouldn't complain. I'm basically getting paid for doing nothing. Occasionally a teacher will leave prep work but more often than not, I'm sitting reading a book in the classroom. I feel like I could go home for a few hours and come back to check out and nobody would know any better. The crazy thing is that only some schools enforce the dismissal time. Some schools even have a note in the sub folder saying "your day begins at 7:30 and ends at 3:30" or something to that effect. Other times, I've gone up to the office about a half hour early asking if they need anything and they send me home.

    I'm guessing that since this is four days, I'll easily fill up the extra hour with getting things set up for the next day, but the one early dismissal day will be a challenge. How many of you are faced with a similar situation where you work? Do you go to the office to volunteer your services for whoever needs it? Or does this reflect badly on the teacher who requested you becasue he/she didn't keep you busy?
     
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  3. love2sub

    love2sub Rookie

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    Jan 13, 2011

    I always stay the time assigned to the job. I feel that there is always something in a school that needs to be done. I never sit and read or do anything not school related while I am on the clock. I always check with the office, library or nearby teachers to see what I can help with. The teachers will also get to know you and usually request you to sub for them later. You could tell the teachers on day 1 that you are looking for something to help fill that 3 hour time so they know in advance to have something ready for you. Trust me the other teachers will notice if a sub is just sitting and reading and not request them. In fact our principal has asked some subs not be sent back to our building for sitting and reading most of the day.
    Personally I would not be comfortable taking money for doing nothing. It also bothers me when I see other subs reading because they are getting the same money as me and I am working.
     
  4. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Jan 13, 2011

    You have to remain for an hour after the kids leave?
    That is a bit much. So if contracted hours are 8 until 3:30 you have to stay until 4:30? That is weird. I stayed until my work is done, which often took an extra 30 minutes after the kids leave but usually no more than that because I started writing the note and organizing all through the day rather than waiting until the end.

    However, once the room is clean and everything is organized and in perfect place for the next day, all documentation done, dismissal duty or other duty done, all students properly dismissed etc I am completely allowed to leave if it's past 3:30.
    Sitting around for 3 extra hours without an assigned and specific task to do seems like a waste.
     
  5. Subber

    Subber Companion

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    Jan 13, 2011

    You need to stay there till 3:30 in case they need you.

    Thia remind to ask something. I'll start a new thread.
     
  6. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jan 13, 2011

    It's staying an hour (hour and a half for the primary) after school lets out. And one day a week, the kids have early dismissal, but we still have to stay a full day.

    It's interesting, because I work in four districts. In two of them, subs are out as soon as the bell rings. In the other two, we're expected to stay this extra time. It's kind of a joke to the full time non-subbing teachers and I think that's why they rarely leave extra work.
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Jan 14, 2011

    At my school subs are now required to report to the office during their planning period. Planning periods are now 90 minutes long, and they would not be paid for that time if they did not go help in the office because it extends beyond their contracted break time, and they are hourly employees. They usually do filing or something else. If subs don't show up in the office, unless they have a very good reason, they go on the "do not call" list at our school. All teachers, regular or subs, are allowed to leave ten minutes after the students do. That's when most subs leave.
     
  8. waffles

    waffles Companion

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    Jan 14, 2011

    That makes me happy that it's half or full day for me.
     
  9. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Jan 16, 2011

    I know my favorite sub corrects papers that she did with the students. I request her all the time, especially when I know I am going to be out for an extended period of time. For instance, I will be out for surgery for about a week and a half. I HATE to come back to piles and piles of completed work. It will normally just go in the trashcan. If I have been sick, I am not up to grading when I first get back, because I have other things to catch up on.

    As others have said, I am sure if you really cannot find anything to do in your assigned classroom, check with other teachers. Someone always needs help copying, grading, laminating, cutting, etc.

    Also, I have very few subs that leave my room the same as when I left... you could help clean and organize :) Kids can make a mess within minutes of their teacher being gone!
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 16, 2011

    If you're contracted for that time, then you have to be there doing work, even when the students are not there. I definitely agree that the best thing to is take care of everything in the classroom. Make sure that all the work you collected is organized and alphabetized by last name. Make sure that the bookshelf looks orderly and that the rows of desks are straight. Erase the board (at least the stuff you wrote). Leave a detailed note for the teacher.

    After you've done those things, check in at the main office and find out what other things they can have you do. There's always something to be done at a school.

    I would also caution you to avoid correcting work unless you know the teacher will want that. Maybe things in the lower grades are different, but at the level where I teach it would just end up being a big hassle if someone else came in and correct all my student work. I don't want correct answers written near incorrect work unless it's written by the student, so if a sub did that I'd be irritated. I don't always correct everything that's wrong, either. Sometimes the focus is on a particular skill (like direct objects) so it's okay if they make a mistake on some other aspect of the activity (like spelling). My point is, make sure that your corrections will be wanted before you do that.

    If all else fails and there really is nothing to do at school even after you've talked to the office staff, bring your nook or a magazine and enjoy a little downtime until you're off the clock.
     
  11. Vince

    Vince Rookie

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    Jan 16, 2011

    Thank you for bringing that up! I've had teachers ask me to correct things but give me no clue how they normally do it. It's nice to get an exact example of how they want things done. I guess if they ask, and they don't tell you how, they can't complain how you do it.
     
  12. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Jan 16, 2011

    Wow! I am amazed that all of you are really asked to do those things as a routine part of subbing! In my district, subs can be expected to have the same preps as the teacher. If they sub during those preps, they are paid additional $ for period subbing. As to helping out in the office, what with the confidential information being housed there, you have to be specially trained in that environment. They would not want just any sub stopping in to work. Oh, and it is perfectly acceptable for a sub to read during a prep period if all the work that the teacher left was completed.
     
  13. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Jan 16, 2011

    Two of my districts have minimum day Wednesdays for grades 1-6.

    One of the districts will just let us leave at 12.45 when the kids are out. I rarely get called from this district however.

    My main district gives us a choice on Wednesday. The kids leave at 1:25 instead of 2:55. We can either stay till 3:00 for a full day's pay, or we can leave at 1:25 and get paid only 75%.

    Kindergartners do not get off early on Wednesdays, so we are usually sent there to help out till the day is over.

    The office managers at the district that does not call much will make us work our high school prep period if we are needed to fill in for a teacher who only needs one period off, or if they are short a sub. This happens about half the time, but there is no extra pay.

    If a contracted teacher works for another teacher during their prep period, they must be paid for that period. They earn about $45 for giving up their hour of prep time.
    Subs, however, do not get paid extra, so the schools take advantage of this and nearly always have subs take the extra periods. Surprise surprise!
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 16, 2011

    Why should a sub get a prep period? What do they need to prep?
     
  15. waffles

    waffles Companion

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    Jan 17, 2011

    Depends on what class it is. Getting supplies ready, getting labs set up fi the teacher is really brave.

    Subs don't need them.

    I think the big difference here is the way we get paid between different districts.

    For me, it's a half day for anything under 4 hours and full day for anything over 4 hours. If I've been there over 4 hours it doesn't matter if I stay or leave as far as what I'm going to get paid is concerned.

    For the middle and high schools they all told me that I should wait 10-15 minutes into the last period and swing by the office on my way out to see if they needed anything. That time was easily covered by writing a note to the teacher and getting everything cleaned up.

    In elementary schools the closest I cam to leaving early was a minute or two before the end of the day announcements if I was a special area teacher that day and didn't have a class right up until the end.

    But you're right, subs don't need a prep period. But in districts where you're paid hourly it's not really fair to make the sub whose prep period is last go home and miss out on some money while a sub whose prep is during the day (and thus can't go home) gets paid for sitting around.
     
  16. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    It depends on the class. Sometimes a prep period is not needed, but they can be used productively in some cases.

    Unfairness sets in due to differing hours worked among subs.

    One sub will work five periods, another six periods, but the pay rate is the same. I feel that subs should get an extra 20% day for the extra class, which is still only about a third of what contracted teachers get for covering extra periods.

    Long term subs are also at a disadvantage.

    I spoke to a long term sub who was in a class for most of the year. But she was still a sub. She therefore frequently had to give up her prep period to cover other classes, at no additional pay.

    In my opinion, this is being taken advantage of due to lack of representation.
     
  17. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2011

    I guess that all comes down to the luck of the draw and the law of averages. There will be jobs that you get where you will get a prep period to do nothing except browse People online. There will be other jobs where you will be asked to cover a rowdy PE class in lieu of a prep. It is what it is.

    While we're on the subject...

    A "prep" period is not the same as a "break". A prep period should be used to do work, even when students are not present. There is really no reason the a sub should be paid more for working during a prep because the sub should always be working during a prep.
     
  18. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    Sometimes a prep period is used as a break. Other times there is work to be done for the class during the prep period. Sometimes teachers request work to be completed during prep periods. Other times I will just do something that needs to be done if it will not mess the up teacher.

    If the teacher assigns work during their prep period, then we have a choice. We either tell the teacher we were called away and couldn't do it, or we work unpaid overtime.
     
  19. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jan 17, 2011

    To the situation with grading unless the teacher explains how he/she does it-- can you imagine grading spelling tests for first or second graders and doing it wrong? How much confusion will it lead to if the teacher regularly writes the number correct but a sub tries to help out and writes the number of words that were missed?

    And even doing prep the teacher leaves can be riddled with areas to mess up that can upset the regular teacher. When I was student teaching, there was a sub and it was an early release day, so the kids got out at noon, but the sub couldn't leave until the end of the work day, which I think was 3:30. The teacher left a list of prep work for the sub to do and then was upset that the sub didn't tackle the work in the order of the list. I expect the sub was of the "pick the low-hanging fruit" variety and did the quickest things first, but the teacher's mindset was to list things in order of importance and assume that that's what the sub would do.

    I don't mind doing anything for anyone. I'd be happy to cut paper, grade work, file, whatever, but explain to me or leave examples. Don't leave me blowing in the wind and then get upset when I improvise.
     
  20. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    You have to stay even if it's a half day for the students?? That's a bit odd. The school is already paying the teacher for that day (technically with salary). They must have extra funds to pay a sub for a whole day instead of just a half day!! :)

    If you're scheduled and being paid to be there, stay and find something to do. Sanitize the room - God knows you can never do that too much in a classroom!! :lol: You could organize/straighten some shelves (students' area NOT teacher's - that may irritate the teacher). An hour or so should be easy to fill, after that, though...

    I tutor, as well as sub, so if there is a computer available, I search some lesson ideas on conference hour/ extra time.
     
  21. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    The subs have the same schedule as the teacher for whom they are subbing. If that teacher has a prep hour, so does the sub. I've been in classes that have them and some that only have the half hour lunch. In my cases, though, if the teacher's prep hour was first hour or last hour, I was scheduled to either come in for 2nd hour or leave after 5th.
     
  22. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    Isn't the pay rate for a long term sub different than a daily sub? In michigan it is bc after 15 days, technically the teacher doesn't have to leave plans. The sub has all the responsibilities of the teacher - I've even done parent-teacher conferences! HOWEVER, that is why a long term sub has to have a teaching certification in MI- to be considered highly qualified.
     
  23. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2011

    As a sub, I always went to the office during the teacher's prep period to see if I was needed elsewhere. Sometimes I had to cover another class, sometimes do office work, and sometimes there wasn't anything for me to do so I got things cleaned up in the room a bit before the students came back. I would never have thought to leave before the end of the school day.
     
  24. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    Most districts will begin paying at a higher rate after 30 consecutive days in a classroom.
    However, I have talked to subs that were replaced just before the 30th day so the district avoids the extra pay.

    Even though long term subs take on all the responsiblilty of the regular teachers, they still do not recieve extra pay to cover other classes during their prep periods. Hence, they work an extra period for free. Contracted teachers must get paid.
     

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