Stay Classy, Indiana!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by AmyMyNamey, Jul 28, 2017.

  1. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Jul 28, 2017

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  3. kellzy

    kellzy Comrade

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    Jul 28, 2017

    In Utah teachers were demonized for so long that we have ended up thousands of teachers short. Seriously. So in order to get the few available, unattached to a district teachers, one district offered a 10% raise for those in their first three years, a competing district offered 12% across the board with bonuses for people willing to defect, these two districts forced every other district in the Wasatch front to up their pay over 10% (including the first district to amend their contract so that 10% raise applied to everyone). There always comes a point where lawmakers realize...oh crap, we can only demonize an entire profession for so long until we screw over everyone.
     
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  4. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Jul 29, 2017

    I think I remember reading that we have only a third as many kids going into teaching programs as we had seven years ago. But it will take more than that to make an impression on Indiana legislators, who are their own special breed of idiot.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  5. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 29, 2017

    This is a case of a flawed perception becoming reality, and it biting society in the backside. So many times, the argument is that "anybody can be a teacher" and "teachers are just well-paid babysitters". This is the premise that states who are hard on teachers base their ideas. One of the biggest things that they argue is that more experienced teachers are paid more and they don't understand the value of experienced teachers (they think any teacher is replaceable by any other teacher).
     
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  6. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Jul 30, 2017

    Not long ago I was talking to someone higher up in the education world than I am about the new mandates that the federal and state government is placing on schools and teachers. The person suggested doing the best you can, but at the end of the day close your door and do what is in the best interest of the students. He said the school won't fire you because no one will want your job because of all the mandates.
     
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  7. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Aug 1, 2017

    True that. But, eventually, it comes to a point that no one wants the job—ever.

    It is a hell of a thing to be a rich white politician and not give a damn about the evil you inflict upon the rest of the world.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
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  8. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Pretty sure it is not only white politicians. There are politicians who I disagree with their views on education of all races.
     
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  9. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    I dunno. Lot of racism here. Economic segregation is real, and just a continuation of racial segregation meant to keep rich white folks feeling safe and superior.

    I cannot see the rampant inequality institutionalized in our education system as anything but the coldly calculated craft of evil, rich, white men in positions of power.

    Perhaps my perspective is merely skewed by the side of the tracks I find myself inhabiting.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
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  10. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Aug 2, 2017

    This has also happened in the UK. Now we are about 20% short in terms of numbers. More teachers leaving that are being trained and 40% of new teachers leave in the first 2 years. And Government Ministers still repeat the line that we have more teachers than ever and we are spending more money than ever on education! We also have increasing numbers of unqualified people standing in front of classes. 24,000 at the latest count!
     
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  11. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    In my state, younger ones should leave in droves based on retirement alone! For example, someone hired after January 1, 2013 must work 10 years before they can retire at 62. That means a fresh graduate who starts teaching at 22 must work until 62 in order to draw benefits. Before that 01/01/13 date, anyone could have worked 25 total years and retire at any age. I'm in the 2nd category but I'm a lot older. 24 years of teaching will get me to 62. I'm just hoping to get to 10 years so I can be vested.
     
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  12. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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  13. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Aug 4, 2017

    When I began teaching in the 80's, there were small but vocal voices promoting instant education. Like Nestlé's Quick, just add milk, stir, and presto. Some experimental and private schools unwittingly saw strong results in achievement test scores, but failed to acknowledge that the scores were not based on a random sampling. (Notwithstanding, many excellent experimental and private schools also had valid results). 50-75% of an average classroom of students will learn no matter how they are taught; a less random sampling will skew test results either to the left or to the right. Meanwhile, these voices found their way into the media. A new viewpoint evolved, that teachers are unrestrained and failing society. Add to this two new pieces of "evidence".

    First of all, many of the students who applied to college were not achieving the high scores on entrance exams that they used to achieve. What was not mentioned was that more students were applying to college. In other words, this phenomenon was due to increased educational success by teachers, not a cheapening of the educational system. Secondly, the Pisa tests ranked the U.S. below other countries. The facts are that the Pisa statistics are questionable in how they are interpreted. Questions need to be asked: In higher achieving countries, is the sample representative of all students? Are their students who achieve higher scores achieving overall in all facets of education and growth, both physically and psychologically; (recent evidence points to psychological difficulties from the pressure in countries with high stakes testing). Finally, if these other countries' educational system is so much better, then why are their teachers learning how to improve their teaching from our educational system, and why are their colleges combining courses with our colleges?
     

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