States that offer certifications/endorsements via exam (Praxis, other)?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Does anyone happen to know which states offer licensure, certification, and/or endorsements by exam (the Praxis tests or some other kind of tests, whatever)?

    My state (NV) lets me add certification areas to my license by actual university coursework only. I'm wanting to add some comprehensive areas like Social Studies and English, which will require a lot of coursework (and therefore $$$ and time). I am toying with the idea of getting licensed in another state, adding a bunch of certification areas via exam, and then trying to transfer that out-of-state license here, if that makes sense.

    I've considered this option before, but I've never investigated it fully because it didn't seem like a time-sensitive issue. Now, for a number of reasons, it does. I'd rather shell out the money for some quick certifications than spend thousands more and take several years to do all the necessary coursework. I appreciate whatever help/advice you guys can offer. Thanks!
     
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  3. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    I know PA does. Dh and I have both added certs via the exams.

    I hope you're able to do it this way and get the added certs you're hoping to get.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    California does: www.cset.nesinc.com. I think Washington state (www.west.nesinc.com: you want WEST-E) and Oregon both do, but don't quote me. Oregon (www.orela.nesinc.com) has just changed over to NESTest computer-based exams, and they're strictly multiple-choice. Arizona, I don't recall, but the Web site is www.aepa.nesinc.com. All these Web sites should give you some idea what the state in question requires one to do to get credentialed.

    I rather think, though, that most states WILL require something like residency.
     
  5. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Virginia gives endorsements for Praxis exams, but I believe they give out of state teachers a 3 year provisional and you then apply for a full license through your school district.
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    To be precise, California allows people to add a subject-matter authorization to an existing credential by passing the relevant CSET. For an initial credential - which is what you're talking about - you might have to pass CBEST (the basic skills test), and you might run afoul of the US-constitution requirement, and there are other things here and there that I don't keep track of because, thank God, credentialing is not my area.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    That's what I'm most worried about. In this day and age of online learning, though, I just don't know. One of the other Latin teachers in the district works with an online charter school company. Per the terms of his employment, he has to become licensed in all the states that his students live in; he currently holds 11 teaching licenses. He obviously doesn't live in 11 different states, so there must be some sort of way around a residency requirement. I'm just hoping that that loophole isn't "employment by a district within the state of licensure".
     
  8. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    I'm not sure about Texas. Here's the link to the site that will answer it for you: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5372

    It seems like you would have to pay $180 to have your Nevada certification considered for a Texas certification. Then once you have that approved, I guess in theory, you're a certified Texas teacher and you can take other certs by exam.

    I know *we* can do that once we have our original cert. They have a live chat available during the work day. Maybe log on and ask someone! :)
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    You shouldn't have to be a resident. If you relocate, you try to get your license first. You may have to become licensed in the state first, and then add the certifications.
     
  10. MsTeckel

    MsTeckel Comrade

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    Missouri allows you to add certification by Praxis ), but you have to have an initial certification first. I didn't take any course work in Missouri. I applied as an out of state applicant to receive my special education certification and plan on adding early childhood special education by taking the Praxis.
     
  11. MsTeckel

    MsTeckel Comrade

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    one concern that you may run into... would be when you go back to your state, that doesn't allow adding certification by test. They won't accept the out of state certification by exam only..and then they will still require you to take the course work

    Im not sure how that works...just a thought
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Yep, that's the sort of overriding question in this whole plan. I've already got an email into the Licensed Personnel office addressing this very issue. If the state won't accept the out-of-state certifications, then the whole plan is off the table.
     
  13. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Colorado does, but I'm not sure if it's in every certification area. I switched my license from an early childhood (birth-age 8) to an elementary education (k-grade 6) simply by taking the elementary content praxis test earlier this year.
     
  14. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

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    I have an elementary certification in CT and NH and am in the process of adding TESOL. Both states require coursework, but CT requires more than NH, so I will have my certification in NH finished first. My original plan was to do similar as you and then transfer the certification to my CT license, but when I looked into it further, I found out that I would have to teach for 3 years in NH under the certification for it to become active in CT. Otherwise, I need the extra classes. So there may be that requirement that you've taught with that additional license.
     
  15. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    My state accepts Praxis II exams in other content areas after doing the coursework necessary for your initial license. I know at least 3 neighboring states accept Praxis scores as well. One does not, but our states have a reciprocity agreement with one another.

    So, I got my initial license in Middle School Math. I've since added Middle School Science by just passing the Praxis II content test and am awaiting results of the HS Math Content Knowledge test. Once I pass that, I will be "highly qualified" to teach high school math as well.

    I just recently received my Tennessee Teacher's License. As another posted mentioned, I was given a 3-year provisional license based on my Praxis II scores. I actually took the GACE test for Middle School Math in Georgia, so I don't know if my GA license is provisional or not.

    The MAIN thing you need to find out is if you're state has a reciprocity agreement with the other states you are looking at. If so, then you might very well be able to add certifications in those states, then have those subject area certifications "transferred" back to your home state as well.

    This website lists all the states that accept Praxis test results for licensure. It also lists states with that require applicants to pass their specific content-area tests.
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

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    That list includes NJ, which just uses the Praxis II to determine if the person can get a license, even for a standard cert in NJ, you need to have taken relevant coursework.
     
  17. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    You can skip over NY. My state's requirements make me shudder.
     
  18. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    So, if you want receive your certification in one subject and then decide you want to add more content areas later, you would have to take the coursework for each additional content area as well?
     
  19. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I thought of this as well. I'd check on it first!
     
  20. Miss84

    Miss84 Comrade

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    DC allows you to obtain certification/endorsements through the Praxis exams (for now). http://osse.dc.gov/
     
  21. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I live in NJ and added two MS Certs after getting my initial cert. I had to take the praxis but I also had to have 15 credits in the subject to get the cert/ One I already had 15 and the other I took a clep for. \

    OP, why can't you just take some CLEP tests for the course work? Are they EDU classes rather than Gen Ed ones?
     
  22. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Correct. If I want to add English, I have to have 36 actual credits in English. They specify certain sorts of courses, like journalism, speech, etc.


    The coursework is major/minor coursework in whatever subject the certification will be in. If I want to add English, I have to take English classes. Just like when you majored in a subject in college, there were requirements for the major classes. A few have to be of this type, at least one of that type, etc. The licensing requirements mirror that.

    Even if I were to get university credit via CLEP exam, which would be okay, I'd need to take the exams for every specific course required per licensing/certification rules. I've looked at the list of available CLEP exams and it offers exams in less than half the courses I would need to take. I guess it's an option for some of the classes, but it doesn't really solve my problem.
     
  23. joe22k

    joe22k Rookie

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    I don't know the answer to the question, but please keep us updated. I would like to do this also if possible!
     
  24. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Correct. You must have at least some credits in the area. I believe it is 15 or 30 credits in a coherent sequence.
     
  25. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Ohio does. In fact, I'm taking a Praxis test in a little less than a month to become HQT in middle school math.
     
  26. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Indiana does. It's also fairly easy to transfer an out-of-state license. Even my initial one when I first graduated only required me taking one Praxis test. The test requirements for transferring can be waived with 3 years of experience. Additional subjects can be added on by testing.

    http://www.doe.in.gov/student-services/licensing/out-state-graduates
     
  27. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    My first teaching license was from Indiana. That might be a good option! Thanks!
     
  28. gregoire

    gregoire Rookie

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    Caesar,

    I hope you will keep us updated. I will post what I have learned lately and hopefully it will help someone.

    I live in California and teach at the secondary level and was able to add a few subjects easily by taking the CSET. Problem is...I want to leave California. I've been calling some different states and this could be a major problem.

    Nevada said if I am certified in all the subjects through CA they should transfer over and I probably won't have to take any classes or tests, except for Nevada history kind of course.:)

    Washington was really confusing and said I need to do some additional classes and then student teaching or a shortened version in my additional subject areas.

    Minnesota where I want to move the most requires the state subject tests and full coursework.:(

    I don't have the time and money to go back for additional college degrees or courses right now, so I'm a little discouraged.
     
  29. houseofbooks

    houseofbooks Companion

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    NJ requires coursework for some certifications. For example, if you're certified in English (like me), but were a double-major in History and have the required credits, then you'd only have to pass the Praxis to become certified in Social Studies. However, if you pass the Praxis and have no history classes on your transcript, you're out of luck. K-5 and PreK-3 only require a general BA and passing the Praxis, however.

    Any interested parties can find NJ's requirements here: http://www.nj.gov/cgi-bin/education/license/endorsement.pl?string=999&maxhits=1000&field=2
     
  30. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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  31. teresateaches

    teresateaches Companion

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    I don't think that is right. You can get a provisional licenses if you do not have all the requirements for full licensure, but out of state licenses are offered reciprocity immediately.

    To use the Praxis exam as a an endorsement, you have to already be fully licensed. Then you can take an additional praxis for licensure.
    I do imagine you would need to live somewhere else though.

    Do none of your colleges offer continuing education courses for teachers? They are usually much cheaper.
     
  32. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    NC does as long as you have a CLEAR license. This means, you can't be an Initially Licensed Teacher.

    There are some areas in which they still require coursework. For example, if one teaches high school English he/she would not be able to get an Elementary license just by taking the Praxis.
     
  33. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    I don't think just taking an exam makes you qualified to teach a a subject. It does the rest of us in that subject area a disservice. I'm glad my state is changing the rules.
     
  34. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    NC does. I've thought about adding on Spanish or ESL. But those aren't areas I'd be really excited to teach.
     
  35. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I really don't understand this point. I have my English single Subject credential, but as far as the content goes all I did was take the exam. I didn't major in English, it was linguistics, it's only remotely connected to the field, and doesn't have anything to do with teaching literature, reading and writing.
    So how is my credential different from someone else's authorization?
     

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