States Flip-flopping on Common Core

Discussion in 'General Education' started by missrebecca, Feb 22, 2015.

  1. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Feb 22, 2015

    Is your state doing this? In Arizona, I was taught to use Common Core in my teaching program, worked at a school that used our old state standards, left for a new school that used Common Core, and now our government is likely going to outlaw Common Core/go back to the old state standards.

    OMG!!!

    It affects our curriculum and planning, because we have to align our teaching to different goals.

    Anyone else stuck in this back-and-forth switcharoo? :dizzy:
     
  2.  
  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,003

    Feb 22, 2015

    What's their rationale for switching back?

    That seems ill-advised.
     
  4. TeacherWhoRuns

    TeacherWhoRuns Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2011
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    52

    Feb 22, 2015

    It's amazing what political pressure will do.

    CC was pretty much a way to sell new books and materials. Now there's push back just because it's new. We haven't even really gone deep enough to see any long term cost/benefit but people are freaking out.

    So, again the textbook market will profit and schools and districts will have even more outdated material in warehouses.
     
  5. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Feb 22, 2015

    I'm willing to bet it is overwhelmingly due to public opinion including those of teachers.

    1. The new assessments appear to be more challenging than the previous tests(at least in California it is), it doesn't sit well with parents and teachers that the results are going to drop significantly.

    2. The standards and the test seem to be geared more towards understanding and more depth than the previous, just get the right answer and circle it.

    This makes it uncomfortable for teachers and parents.
     
  6. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Feb 22, 2015

    Yeah, it's due to public opinion -- my state is mostly Republican, and there's been an outcry about the Common Core standards ever since they were introduced.

    Those are the reasons, exactly. Our old state standards were pretty low compared to the rest of the country -- with public schools relying on standardized test scores for funding, and the CC standards being more challenging, it's not an appealing equation for a lot of people.
     
  7. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Feb 22, 2015

    Yeah... as far as the public is concerned, there is no real evidence for CC being good or bad. Teachers using the material have an opinion, but IMO it's still pretty early to praise or criticize it. The actual standards are one thing, the way you teach them is another.

    I'm just tired of having to use curriculums that align with the wrong standards. I've had to deal with so many outdated/updated curriculums that don't align with the right set of standards. Where are we supposed to get the funding to keep buying more teaching material? :confused:
     
  8. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,299
    Likes Received:
    876

    Feb 22, 2015

    I don't get the problem that people have with Common Core, but I get a chuckle out of the idea that the standards themselves encourage more in-depth thinking or what have you.
     
  9. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Feb 22, 2015

    I agree grade3, it is not so much the standard itself but the way it is assessed on the standardized tests.
     
  10. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    496

    Feb 22, 2015

    I think republicans object to CC because it comes from the federal government, and they generally don't like to be told what to do by the feds.

    I think the rest of us object to it because teachers had no input or any way to adjust it. Pearson, the testing company, pretty much wrote it with little or no input from child development experts (teachers). It was never tested before being adopted by 45 states.
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,033
    Likes Received:
    893

    Feb 22, 2015

    There is talk in my state of getting rid of PARCC. Our opt out rates are huge, and some entire districts have even tried to opt out. I haven't heard much about getting rid of CC itself, but I'm not sure if that would go hand in hand with getting rid of PARCC or not. I'm not sure if you could keep one without the other? I live in a liberal part of the state and I suspect that there may be more anti-CC talk in the more conservative areas, based on what I've seen elsewhere.
     
  12. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Feb 23, 2015

    It doesn't come from the federal government - it's from the National Governors Association, however, the federal government did give states incentives for adopting it as part of the Race to the Top grants.
     
  13. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,299
    Likes Received:
    876

    Feb 23, 2015

    It didn't come from the federal government... but it kind of did. There's a reason why some states adopted CCSS before actually seeing them, and that reason isn't because they were that sure of their quality.
     
  14. scholarteacher

    scholarteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,684
    Likes Received:
    39

    Feb 23, 2015

    The Common Core has some expectations that are not appropriate for my grade, kindergarten. Then again, some of what we used to teach is no longer taught, thus "dumbing down" some of our subject area. So much of the decision making was made by non-educators. NC is thinking about pulling out, too.
     
  15. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,003

    Feb 23, 2015

    My understanding was that the new standards focused in more on a few crucial standards and teaching them in depth instead of trying to catch everything.

    I think the standards are great. They're far more rigorous than the original state standards in CA which encouraged more memorizing of facts than critical thinking.

    I think we should just stick with one thing and let it work for a while before we freak out and change again willy-nilly. That's just going to cause the students to suffer.
     
  16. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,091
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 23, 2015

    This is our first and last year using PARCC. No idea what we will use next year.
     
  17. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    2,030
    Likes Received:
    6

    Feb 24, 2015

    The people who run our state are dense and have no idea what really makes education work. They are just going with the poltical choice that they think will make them look good.
     
  18. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Feb 25, 2015

    My state dropped the CCSS this year and wrote their own new ones. However, in order to still receive that federal money, they still had to have certain "elements" of the CCSS. So what we ended up with is a mash-up of the CCSS (virtually all of them, basically word-for-word) AND our old state standards. Which means, especially in math, we have the breadth of our old standards, which covered a lot of topics on a surface level, and the depth of Common Core on certain topics. This basically equals two years worth of material we are expected to cover! :dizzy:
     
  19. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    143

    Feb 25, 2015

    That's not much different than the old standards...in some (not all) subjects,there was more there than could reasonably expected to be covered (adequately) in one school year.

    The one thing about teaching math (at least at the secondary level)...it (the subject) hasn't changed much in the last 300-400 years (or whenever calculus was "invented".) So, whether you are teaching to the "new" standards or "old" standards, it is virtually impossible to stray "off topic". So, I don't see a lot of difference in things. The wording has changed but not the content imo. So, it's much ado about nothing. Of course, it may be completely different at the lower levels.
     
  20. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Feb 25, 2015

    The content definitely changed between our old standards and the CCSS. There were many concepts that changed which grade levels covered them or were left out entirely. But, the topics that remained were covered in greater depth. And yes, our old standards already had more than we could cover--now it is just impossible to try to do all of those things at the same time.
     
  21. MissMae

    MissMae Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2013
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 7, 2015

    I'm in Arizona as well, and I am just as stumped as you. We are all freaking out with the Merit coming in two months. There really is now way to prep my kids for these tests, and I just finished conferences. My parents are all concerned.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. cbblue,
  2. TeacherNY,
  3. Caesar753
Total: 236 (members: 4, guests: 208, robots: 24)
test