Starting Pay

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by CatfaceMeowmers, Dec 19, 2014.

  1. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Dec 19, 2014

    So I just graduated with an MAT in middle level math and English. I have no teaching experience, besides 3 years of substitute experience.

    I am currently residing in AR but will be moving to NV very shortly (with no job LOL).

    I read that the starting pay for MA+0 is $40k. How is this as a starting pay? I mean, I'm not complaining. I just never really thought much about salary or benefits. It's still a bit scary to see myself as a real adult... (I'm in my early twenties).

    And this may be a laughable question, but how "easy" is it to up your pay?

    Thanks guys :)
     
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  3. Froreal3

    Froreal3 Companion

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    Dec 20, 2014

    You need to look up the pay scale for teachers in NV. I assume this is the page you would look at (under licensed personnel).

    http://ccsd.net/employees/current/employment/salary

    The cost of living in the area in which you settle will determine whether those are good salaries or not. Make a mock budget with all of your expenses (including rent, student loans, car, food, entertainment, miscellaneous, savings, utilities etc) and see if this salary is livable. Ask yourself if you'd like to have children in the future and if your future salary (pay increases as you gain experience and education) will allow you to live comfortably.

    As far as how easy it is to up your pay...well it looks like you need to gain both experience and further education (which is typical). Ask if exams for credit can be used or credits at online institutions etc.

    Good luck
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 20, 2014

    Ditto what Froreal said. Not sure if NV has a state mandated scale or if individual districts set their own...I started in my district 15 years ago with a Masters and was hired at step 1 for one year public experience although I had two additional years in private school... I now have increased my salary through years of experience in district plus 60 credits beyond my MA puts me at over $30k more than what the ASC plus PhD at step 15 is (highest pay on that scale) on the NV Scale linked above. COL is high though in my area and I'm in one of the top paid districts in the state. Bottom line, it's all relative and geographic.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Dec 20, 2014

    A lot of things factor into pay. Health insurance. Union Dues. The area's cost of living.

    When I left NC to move back to MI, my salary went up over 10K. My bring-home difference is around $100 a month. In NC, I didn't pay for my health insurance and there weren't any unions. The cost of living is lower here, which is why I don't have to work two jobs like I did while living in NC.
     
  6. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Dec 21, 2014

    Thank you all for the responses, though I'm still not quite sure how this works. Though I will start at 40k, that's not necessarily my take home money, right? Recently, I had a teacher say she made 52k but only brought home 37k. Is this common?

    Thanks again!
     
  7. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Dec 21, 2014

    The 40k is before they take out money for taxes, retirement, insurance, etc. You will bring home less than that, but it's hard to say exactly how much.
     
  8. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Dec 21, 2014

  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Dec 21, 2014

    It includes your benefits- what they add to your retirement, health insurance, etc...
     
  10. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Dec 21, 2014

    Depending on health insurance costs, you can usually expect to bring home 65-70% of your salary- after taxes.
    If you gross $3000 a month, you would bring home roughly $2000 a month.
     
  11. P Chang

    P Chang Companion

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    Dec 21, 2014

    Total Value of Offer = Justification for why you're getting crappy pay. I used to be a cop...they did the same thing in that profession as well. :lol:

    Were I so inclined, I'd add up the cost of my BA and MA, determine what a first year teacher in my area makes (something like $36k a year) and see how long I'd have to work to pay me back on my education investment, but that would just be depressing. :(

    As for NV, I thought of moving there and then found out I would need to have been a student-teacher, which my degree didn't require, so that state is out of the running. Now I'll have to teach where I am for a few years before making the move to NV if that's where I eventually would like to go.
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 22, 2014

    65-70% seems high.:2cents:
     
  13. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Dec 24, 2014

    So depressing T_T :(
     
  14. Froreal3

    Froreal3 Companion

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    Dec 26, 2014

    LOL Yes it does, especially if you don't have many dependents and exemptions. I filed for a lot of exemptions and I take home a good amount of my pay.
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I'm wondering where you got this information of $40,000? With a master's and less than a year of teaching experience, it would appear in both AR and NV that a reasonable starting salary expectation would be more like $7 -10 thousand more than that. In NJ, my master's gets me $62000, but our cost of living is high. This is at a private school, and it would be worth maybe $3-4 thousand more in a public school. As for what you will bring home, Uncle Sam will pretty much take the first 20%, and then it is time to pay your portion of the insurances, dues, retirement (if you are smart), and whatever else they throw at you. If you are single, you will take home more pay than a married person paying for insurance for self and family. If you are married and those benefits are already yours, then you will take home more money. Because I provide benefits for our family, I pay about $400 per pay period for my various health insurances, and I get paid twice a month. Remember, since I don't get paid over the summer, that is figured in so that the premiums are covered when I am not making money. If that seems high, consider that health insurance for my hubby and I costs $1600 a month in NJ for similar coverage, without dental insurance or a life insurance policy. My benefits were better in public school, but you work where the job is. The trade off is that I don't have union dues, and I do not have to belong to NJEA, paying their membership fee. Mind you, I wouldn't want to work in a public school without those things, but in private schools, things are different. I do get tuition reimbursement as a benefit at no cost to myself, but I also got that at the public school. My employer basically paid for the master's that earns me more money.

    I don't think my salary is exceptional, but I do believe it is much more than many earn, and there is no denying that I like the longer breaks in spring and the holidays, as well as the two months off in the summer. To work year round and be similarly compensated, I would need to earn about $70000, since tuition reimbursement probably wouldn't be available. I would say that single, you should bring home 68-70% of your gross pay, if providing the benefits for anyone other than yourself, that will drop to 63-66%. These are on average, and assume that you are off 2 months out of the year. Charter schools make less than most private schools, private schools approach public schools, and affluent districts have higher paying public schools. Remember to keep adding endorsements as possible, as these often increase your value to the district, and the credits may give you a pay bump on the salary scale. I don't feel under-compensated, honestly, because the ability to continue to attend grad school on someone else's dime has real monetary meaning to me. If I just attend two classes a year, that is over $5000 I didn't spend out of my own pocket. It would be wrong not to see that as real value.

    By the way - the starting salary range for your qualifications were exactly the same in AR and NV when I researched. Cost of living I didn't look at. Good luck!
     
  16. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Dec 26, 2014

    I obviously didn't go into teaching for the pay, but after depending on my husband for the last 2 years since I've been going to school, I would like to be able to support him for a while. I am not too worried about it, since it will be my first job, I won't be picky - money is money :)
     
  17. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Dec 27, 2014

    Here's a tax tip - in NJ, take 2% of your AGI, then add up all of your medical expenses for the year (co-pays for doctors and medications, insurance premiums, any non-covered expenses) and then $0.24 for every mile driven - If you get over the 2% of your AGI with that, you can deduct whatever is over the 2% off your NJ state taxes.
     

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