starting career teaching in a private school

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by luv2teachmath, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. luv2teachmath

    luv2teachmath Rookie

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2012

    Hello everybody!
    Let me just start out by saying I love this forum!

    Anyway, I just graduated with a SS Math credential in So. CA. I'm applying for jobs, and have had a couple of offers. However, I'm seriously considering teaching in a private school. I grew up in private schools, and I do feel more comfortable in that environment. Behavior management is less of an issue, which is definitely a plus for me.
    With my personality and background, I'm afraid I won't be able to connect well to public school children. However, I know private schools pay considerably less, and I do want to end up teaching in a public school....eventually. My question is....do people here think it will be difficult to transition from a private school to public school environment? I know it will be a culture shock. Would it just be better to suck it up, teach in a public school, and "toughen up?"

    Anyone else on here grow up in a sheltered environment, and has been successful teaching in "rough" schools?

    Thanks much!
     
  2.  
  3. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

    Joined:
    May 15, 2011
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2012

    Hello!

    I think if you really feel comfortable in the private school scene, shop around a bit. Not all private schools pay less. I have worked at two private schools, both in Los Angeles, and both pay considerably MORE than public school. I managed to get into two pretty elite schools, which I am very thankful for. CalWest is a great resource for information on private schools. Good luck!
     
  4. luv2teachmath

    luv2teachmath Rookie

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2012

    CalWest.....I'll check out that website, thanks!

    As far as clearing my credential, I hear they are giving more time than the standard 5 years because the job market is so bad right now.
     
  5. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

    Joined:
    May 15, 2011
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2012

    There are also BTSA programs you can complete while teaching in private school. I did that after two years and was able to get my credential cleared in one year. Downside though was that I had to pay for it.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 6, 2012

    I'm a Catholic school kid from the 'burbs of Long Island. I student taught in a large public school in New York City..

    And it was fine. A little bit of culture shock, but fine. Kids are kids.

    That said, I've made my career teaching in other Catholic high schools on Long island-- 7 years in the first and 19 in my current school. And there's not a place in the world I would rather be. And I agree about the pay-- my salary is certainly competitive with most of the local public schools. Like anything else, it's hard to generalize. But some private schools pay remarkably well.
     
  7. luv2teachmath

    luv2teachmath Rookie

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 6, 2012

    Wow, I'm surprised so many people made comparable amounts at private schools. That's very encouraging :)

    I've talked to some teachers around here who started in private schools, and most of them said the pay was very low. But really, pay isn't the big issue. I'm single and live at home. I really don't need to be raking in the dough right now :p

    I think I'm more concerned about classroom management, especially during my first year. I, by nature, am very strict and studious. I'm concerned that with my personality I just won't jive with the students around here. My student teaching assignments were in low SES area. The middle school went fine. My CT was very supportive of me being tough on students. At the high school, not so much. My CT even told me to "soften up" and "relax", but then again she let the students get away with whatever :eek:hmy:

    Anyway, I've had several people tell me they can see me teaching in a private school, but then again I feel like it was a waste to spend all this time and money on a credential. Ok, I realize I'm babbling. I guess I'm wondering if anyone ever started their career in a private school, but regretted it? Would it be better to just start in public, and stay there?
     
  8. teachin4ever

    teachin4ever Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Messages:
    660
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 6, 2012

    My first three years of teaching was in a private (Catholic) school. This year was my first year teaching in a public school.

    While I had a pretty awful experience working in a Catholic school, it had nothing to do with the work or the students. It's a VERY long story and had everything to do with the principal and pastor. But do I regret it? Absolutely not. I'm the teacher I am today because of the experience I gained during those three years and what I had to put up with.

    As far as behavior management goes, I've honestly never had a problem in that department, but I really don't see a difference in the behavior of students at a Catholic school vs. public school. Teenagers are teenagers where ever you teach. I think everyone assumes that students at a private school are better behaved and more disciplined, but in my experience, I haven't found that to be the case.

    Good luck in whatever avenue you choose to take!
     
  9. luv2teachmath

    luv2teachmath Rookie

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 6, 2012

    @stampin' teacher: how much did it cost to clear BTSA on your own?
     
  10. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 6, 2012

    At many private schools, you do have to have a license/credential. I wouldn't at all consider that a waste anyway, even if the school you ended up at didn't require one.
     
  11. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

    Joined:
    May 15, 2011
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 6, 2012

    $1,900 a year and depending on your experience, you may/may not qualify for the expedited program.

    Within my 4 years in private school I'm seeing more and more schools desiring credentials and other advanced degrees. Much more than even when I started (which wasn't that long ago).

    Like I said, CalWest is a head hunting program that many elite private schools use to weed people out. Many of the schools they use pay considerably more. When I first started, I was an associate teacher and made more than my friend who was a lead at a public school.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 189 (members: 2, guests: 173, robots: 14)
test