Starting a YouTube Channel

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Ricardo Torres, Jun 4, 2020.

?

Should I continue making videos on my new channel?

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
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  2. No

    100.0%
  1. Ricardo Torres

    Ricardo Torres Rookie

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    Jun 4, 2020

    I just started a new YouTube
    I was wondering if some of you can take a look at the video and tell me what you think.
    But I can't seem to post anything on this site. I keep getting messages stating that my content is not allowed. Why?
     
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  3. Ricardo Torres

    Ricardo Torres Rookie

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    Jun 4, 2020

    How to Make a Video Lesson for Distance Learning on iPad in Less Than 10 Minutes
     
  4. Ricardo Torres

    Ricardo Torres Rookie

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    Jun 4, 2020

    Okay, so it seems I can post parts of what I am trying to say.
    my channel is called
    TFT - Teacher for Teachers

    and you can search my first video with the title
    How to Make a Video Lesson for Distance Learning on iPad in Less Than 10 Minutes
    It seems that if I link a url i cannot post.
    I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jun 5, 2020

    Here is the link for Ricardo's video.

    You have to have a certain number of posts before you can post links on this forum. :)
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jun 5, 2020

    Ricardo,
    I watched your video. Here are my observations.
    • The visuals are very clear, which is good.
    • The whole "writing utensil" thing threw me off. I constantly use an iPad in teaching, and I've never used a writing utensil. As a teacher, I've never used one, never had one, and when I heard I needed one (if I hadn't made myself watch the whole thing) I would have just clicked off. You've got to know your audience.
    • The music at the ending is WAY louder than the rest -- it is jarring and made me rush to hit the mute button. It is obvious it was recorded either at a different time or in a different method. Always watch those sound levels. I had earphones on, and it was painful!
    • I don't quite know how to say this without sounding unkind. While the information is good, it is just that --- good. If a video wants to keep my attention, it has to be way more than good. It didn't have any pop, any sparkle, any thing to keep me engaged.
    • It droned on. By the second minute, I was starting to multitask because it just wasn't engaging enough. I forced myself to watch the entire thing -- but that is exactly what I had to do --- force it. If I had searched for a video on this topic, and then just played this, I would have clicked off prior to the 2 minute mark and searched for something else.
    • While you aren't a monotone, your voice lacks any excitement. I'm not sure how you can change this but it is going to take a lot of practice, and setting aside of the ego, because it is always hard to hear that something is "missing."
    I first started making videos way back, before it was "easy." (Back in the early 2000s, when you had to record the sound track separately, and then stitch everything together. My voice just happens to be "too high" sometimes. I have known this since high school when I was a host on a radio show. I had to practice lowering the pitch of my voice. It took lots of work and lots of practice, and when I get going, sometimes I forget, and I end up having to rerecord it later. With you, it isn't the timbre of your voice, it is the rhythm -- it never varies. Variety is what makes it interesting when you are a listener.

    I'm not saying any of this to discourage you, and truly, it is hard to be this honest with you when I have no idea how you are going to take it. But you asked for honest opinions, and I'm giving it to you. If this is important to you, spend a few weeks just listening to all the highest rated youtubes out there for educators, and see which ones attract you, engage you, stimulate you. Find out which parts draw you in, and then see how you can make that a part of your presentation. I'm not saying you should give up on your dream. I'm just saying you are still at the researching, practicing, and learning stage. I think you jumped ahead to the production and distribution stage too soon. I'll be interested to see what others say on this thread -- to see if they have similar ideas or different ideas.

    I do wish you the best of luck in your endeavor.
     

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