Stand and Deliver, Movie

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by WonderW05, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. WonderW05

    WonderW05 Comrade

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    Sep 14, 2006

    I am wondering if any of you have suggestions on whether or not I should show Stand and Deliver to my 7th grade students. I would like to show it however it has a PG and not quite sure if it would be appropriate to show to them? If not, any suggestions as to what movie I could show them that is related to Math? Thank you
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Sep 14, 2006

    NO suggestions, but I would not show it.
     
  4. mnteacherguy

    mnteacherguy Companion

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    Sep 14, 2006

    Beautiful Mind?? or is that R?
     
  5. mnteacherguy

    mnteacherguy Companion

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    MissFrizzle....just curious why you wouldn't show Stand and Deliver??? It teaches about diversity and shows the students some success they could have
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 15, 2006

    Haven't seen the movie, so I can't comment specifically. I have shown PG movies to classes in the past--after careful previewing and with justification for showing the movie firmly in my mind (also, with a good understanding of the kids in my class). When my daughter's teacher (grade 5, I think) wanted to show a movie that could have caused some controversy, she sent home a note (with signed permission attached) to parents explaining the content of the movie and her reasons for showing it.
     
  7. Suburban Gal

    Suburban Gal (formerly Elizabeth) Banned

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    Why wouldn't you want to show Stand and Deliver just because of the PG rating. In Stand and Deliver, the teacher was the reason that kids wanted to be successful. The kids, who others had given up on, were successful in AP Calc and went on to really better themselves. Not to mention, set a standard that allowed subsequent classes to do batter and better and keep upping the AP Calc scores. To me, it helps illustrate a POWERFUL message to any child that sees it and thus SHOULD be shown.

    Granted I'm not a parent, but have seen the movie a zillion times to see NOTHING that would be highly questionable in it. Thus, all parents hould be more than approving to this movie.

    You could show Contact with Jodie Foster and Matthew McConaughey, which also has a PG rating, but the book's nonsense about pi isn't even in the movie. So, I wouldn't go showing that for math.

    Proof, a P-13 movie with Gwyneth Paltrow and Sir Anthony Hopkins, might be good to show (if you really don't want to show Stand and Deliver) because the themes are universal and the emotional life of mathematicians is dealt with quite well. The math jokes aren't that great, but it's fun to hear the two waves of laughter. :)

    Good luck! :cool: let us know what you choose to do.
     
  8. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Sep 15, 2006

    Our district has a policy about movies. We cannot show a PG-13 movie without a signed permission slip and we have to provide an alternative activity for the students who don't bring the slip or aren't allowed to see the movie. (I do this for Whalerider and Iron Jawed Angels, which isn't rated, but would probably be a PG-13 if it were). For PG movies, we can show them at our discretion as long as the content isn't questionable. There are many movies made before the PG-13 movies that would be unsuitable for showing in school. I haven't seen the movie in question since I was in high school, but I use this test: When I view the film I ask myself if it is something I would want my daughter to see in school? If the answer's yes, I show the film. If the answer's no, I don't!
     
  9. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    I was thinking that our district would not allow it to be shown. Too many parents today are very strict when it comes to ratings, etc.
     
  10. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    Sep 15, 2006

    I have shown stand and deliver in the past and will probably do so again this year. For the most part, the kids enjoy it.

    With any movie you show in the classroom, you should view it first. Unfortunately, depending on how many classes you have, you will end up seeing the movie several times. I pretty much have the whole movie memorized by the end of the day.

    dave
     
  11. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    If we show a movie that's over PG-13 to grades 7 and up, we have to have a signed permission slip from the parents. WE have to explain WHY we're showing the movie, and I always make sure the parents have access to viewing it. I also have an alternate assignment for anyone can't watch it. I've shown R-rated movies before with 7th grade. I'd check first with the principal.

    One year I had all seniors, and all my students were 17 and older. I didn't have to have permission slips for any of them . . . although I did send them home for the 17 year olds just in case.
     
  12. rhassinger

    rhassinger Rookie

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    Sep 15, 2006

    I would not show Stand and Deliver to 7th graders on the basis that it is a movie about high schoolers. The run-down high school environment that it was filmed in could be frightening to kids who are still trying to adjust to middle school. Also, the character conflicts in the movie are more characteristic to those of late teens and adults and are not going to be familiar ground to preteens. I might suggest Lean on Me instead, which is just as inspirational but has characters of about the same age.
     
  13. Suburban Gal

    Suburban Gal (formerly Elizabeth) Banned

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    While I agree with the latter part, it's STILL a good movie about math - which is excatly what she's looking for.

    When Stand and Deliver came out in 1988, I was in the 8th grade. If I had NO problems understanding that the teacher was the reason that kids wanted to be successful, that the kids, who others had given up on, were successful in AP Calc and went on to really better themselves, and set a standard that allowed subsequent classes to do better and better and keep upping the AP Calc scores. Then I have no doubts her kids will be able to pick up on that and understand that too. After all, that's the underlying message of the movie. As an 8th grader, I could care less about all the conficts and am pretty sure her kids will too.

    Lean on Me has nothing to do with math and she wants a math movie.
     
  14. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Sep 15, 2006

    I wish we had this problem where I am. It seems like my students have seen EVERYTHING!! The movies these 4th graders talk about constantly amazes me! I was raised by extremely strict parents when it came to movies - ratings were the law! While I still think that my parents were a little extreme, I can't believe the other extreme which I see in so many of my class families.
     
  15. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2006

    Just tell the kids about the movie- make it sound really good, then give them botes to parents to get signed and return.
    Most parents will probably allow it b/c they know about it. It was a popular movie. Give a way for concerned parents to reach out to you for details f they aren't sure.
     
  16. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Sep 16, 2006

    Our parish policy is no movie, in the rooms, that aren't G. That's all the way through. Even with parent permission, if the movie is PG, it wouldn't be allowed. (I'm not saying that teachers don't show movies that aren't G, they do, but when there are problems, they have no recourse. And there have been problems.)
     
  17. Happy Lady

    Happy Lady Rookie

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    Although I used to show a movie occasionally, I would not show this movie because of the rating and the educational value. Anymore I feel so much pressure and to teach all the required standards, there doesn't seem to be any time for movies.
     
  18. Kathryn

    Kathryn Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2006

    It's really hard to find math-related movies that you can actually use in the classroom. I would only use this particular movie after testing is over at the end of the year (probably for my calculus class after the ap test and my pre-calculus class who are preparing to go into calc).

    At my school (and probably many others), there is a huge push for aligning instructional time to standards. I can't think of a single movie that relates to any state or national standards in math. While it may be fun, it's necessary to ask yourself whether or not it will help students learn the course content.
     
  19. mnteacherguy

    mnteacherguy Companion

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    I agree that very few movies could be used to teach math. However, for those days you have a sub (which are usually a wash anyways) or to reward students after a particularly difficult test I think a movie is ok in the classroom. Movies or other math related activities (Soduko or mind puzzles which work on problem solving) are GREAT for before a long break.
     
  20. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Funny how different schools are. We're NOT allowed to leave movies for a sub, nor are we allowed to use them for a reward.
     
  21. mnteacherguy

    mnteacherguy Companion

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    The only time I leave a movie for a sub is if I call in sick and don't have time to find a quality math sub. Nothing against subs who have degrees in something else, but personally I would not feel qualified to go in a teach an english, history, or any other subject as a math teacher, so I don't expect my subs too.

    It really is funny how different schools and districts operate.
     
  22. dehabel

    dehabel Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2006

    Stand and Deliver is an awesome movie. I would certainly show it!
     
  23. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Sep 18, 2006

    Our county has a rated G policy. I think you need to go and ask your principal. I did have a movie that was rate PG last year and my principal told me to just to send home a permission form. As long as all parents have signed it I don't see what the problem would be.
     

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