SPIRE Grade 5

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by OUOhYeah, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Aug 21, 2016

    Has anyone used this curriculum for 5th grade and had success with it? I really like some of the ideas within the curriculum.
     
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  3. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Aug 21, 2016

    This is the S.P.I.R.E Reading Intervention Curriculum. I was thinking of using it for Guided Reading groups.
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Aug 22, 2016

    Yes! Have used and would recommend, with caveats. SPIRE is going to focus a LOT more on phonics & fluency, much less so on vocab & comprehension. You can, from my experience, use it for vocab & comprehension, but you'd have to create your own activities, questions, etc., using the material. It does not come stock with that stuff.

    So....in 5th grade a lot of kids have made a pretty big transition into reading to learn, and may not need as much work on phonics & fluency, so if you did use it with 5th grade small groups, I'd probably only use it with lower groups.

    You also mentioned Level 5 (in your message to me), and I'd note that SPIRE's levels do not correspond to grade levels. So, you'd want to do the initial assessment with each child and then place them in the appropriate level based on skill.

    Hope this helps!
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I think SPIRE is a good program, but I'm not sure it's appropriate for guided reading groups. It is really something that should be implemented as a pull-out reading intervention program. It's not something for the gen ed classroom teacher to implement.
     
  6. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I 100% disagree. It is something that can and should be utilized for Guided Reading. It does exactly that... guides students through reading. I am not saying I will do this 100% of the time, but I am going to use it, especially with my students that struggle with reading. This program is amazing. I went ahead and got levels 4 and 5 because the other teacher has one through three.
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I'm not familiar with the program--other than what I found through Google. If I found the right program, it is designed for beginning and struggling readers. Most of your students, in Grade 5, won't need intensive work in phonics and fluency and your focus will likely be on developing and using comprehension strategies, etc. It certainly could be something you use with some of your students, but you may find that it won't be appropriate for all.
     
  8. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 22, 2016

    How will you follow the program with fidelity if you are implementing it in a gen ed guided reading setting? The program requires 60-90 min per day to implement effectively. Most guided reading lessons are 10-20 minutes. The principles of the program are good for the word work component of guided reading, but the it would be very tough - nearly impossible - to implement the program with fidelity in a guided reading lesson. Guided reading, assuming you are following the Fountas and Pinnell research, has a certain structure to it, and SPIRE does not fit into that structure.

    Perhaps you aren't teaching guided reading as it is typically taught... or maybe you are not going for fidelity with the program. I'm not sure, but I do think you'll be surprised at how difficult it is to implement in a gen ed class with fidelity - or even close to fidelity.

    Also, as EdEd said, level 5 is not intended for fifth grade. SPIRE is a program intended for students with dyslexia or other reading disabilities with skill deficits in phonics. If you have a fifth grade student who is ready for level 5 of the program, then they most certainly do not need to be taught using SPIRE. It's unlikely levels 4 and 5 would be used until middle school grades and, again, only for students requiring tier 2 and 3 interventions in a small group, pull-out setting.

    I get the feeling that you won't like what I'm telling you and will probably ignore or discount what I've shared here because it's not what you want to hear. That is fine. However, you should know that I've received formal training in SPIRE, and I have 3 years of experience teaching it to students in special education and one year of experience as a gen ed teacher of students who have received it in a pull-out setting. I've also received introductory training to Wilson Reading System, SPIRE's much more expensive counterpart.

    What I fear is that you will attempt to pull this off, refer your students for testing, say that you've tried this SPIRE intervention, and then purport that it has been an ineffective intervention for your students, unable to meet their needs... When, in fact, you have not been implementing the program as intended, and the problem lies not with the program or the students' needs, but with poor implementation. Please understand that, if you attempt this, it's unlikely you will see good, timely results, and the program nor the student can be to blame.
     
  9. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2016

    First and foremost, I have been trained in multiple reading intervention programs including SPIRE. I do have students with dyslexia and are ELL that need INTENSE phonics instruction. I am also following Fountas and Pinnell's model. I am also working on incorporating more Marzano words. Also, I think it should be commended that I am at least attempting to find all of this information out. All I was doing was to complete the series as another teacher has the others. I apologize for not giving all of this information upfront, but I think this is a bit harsh insinuating that I am doing harm to the students. I am not like that. I am trying to find everything out that I can. What level do you think grade 4/5 would be on? level 2 or 3?
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I was not insinuating that you were doing harm. I was only cautioning you to not expect grand and fast results and to not blame the program or students when you don't see them. I am sure that you do have students with intense needs. My point is that, while it IS commendable that you want to help them, you're really not in a place to do so, being a gen ed teacher trying to squeeze what you can into a guided reading block. That level of intervention needs to be provided by a specialist or interventionist, not a classroom teacher. That's why schools hire people in those positions. If your school doesn't, that doesn't mean that it falls on you to haphazardly implement a program that was never intended for gen ed.

    To answer your question, it is hard to say what level a fifth grade student would be on, as the levels are not aligned to grade-levels but rather skill levels. I've worked with students who were still on level 1 in fifth grade, and I've worked with students who were on level 3 in fourth grade. Any students who placed higher than that were typically dismissed from the program, because they no longer showed a significant deficit. As EdEd said, you really have to do the initial placement assessment with each student to ensure that they are on the right level, and you have to let the students' rate of skill acquisition set the pace. You can't select a level simply based on grade-level, nor can you set a pacing schedule.
     
  11. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Aug 23, 2016

    So, I think there may be some terminology confusion with "guided reading" - some folks, myself included, tend to (perhaps inappropriately) use the term to refer to any small group reading instruction that is "guided." Others speak of it as a specific activity in which a small group of students meet with the teacher and read the same book together at the same time, with specific instructional strategies used to promote fluency, comprehension, etc.

    For me, I would certainly consider SPIRE appropriate for small group instruction, but to bella84's point it wouldn't so much be used for the specific "guided reading" activity that some people refer to. Hope that makes sense.

    To respond to the 60-90 minutes comment bella84, I'd suggest that not every single one of those activities need to be included for each letter sequence (depending on the difficulty and student response to the particular skill). I'd also suggest that you can break up the activities into 2 different sessions, for example doing the first 5 one day, and second 5 the next. This may slightly break fidelity, but not in a way that I can see would make a substantial difference unless you're doing research.

    I also add in my own activities as well, for example working on sight words and comprehension/vocab stuff, given that I find SPIRE to be less helpful in those areas.

    Yes, to echo comments grades are not aligned with levels, so you'd have to do a placement assessment and place kids in the appropriate level based on results, generally at the upper end of their current mastery level. Then, move from there.
     

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