Sped Teachers-Question re: Student Schedules

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by btteach, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. btteach

    btteach Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2010

    For those of you who use daily schedules for your students - do you post the schedules in one common place for students to use (on a wall, etc.), or on the student's desks, or in binders that they take with them to services, mainstreaming, etc.?

    Last year I had the visual schedules for each student velcroed to their desks, with all the icons separated into containers at one spot in the room. (Maybe because the icons weren't stored at the individual desks:confused:) the aides were never consistent about having students make up their schedules and use them/follow them on a daily basis.

    What works for you? I want a system that is student-friendly, but also para/aide-friendly, so the students get in the habit of setting up their own schedules and using them consistently. Any feedback would be appreciated!
     
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  3. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 21, 2010

    bbteach - if you go back and look at teachersk's post titled "a million little pieces" (or something like that) she has a great schedule system that has the students taking the schedule piece out of a binder and then putting it where they are working or going until that thing is done and then putting it in the finished bin.

    I use different schedules for different students and no schedule for some. I love the above idea and I'm trying to modify it a bit to allow for my students who need a lot smaller steps in schedules and for those with physical limitations as I really like it.
     
  4. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 21, 2010

    btteach--

    As M2M mentioned, I currently use a binder system. What makes my system easy and manageable is that the kids set up their own schedules at the end of the day. Being an autism class, the kids ROCK at knowing what the schedule is. I'd say about half of the kids can rearrange their schedule for the next day (independently) and the other half get help from those kids who are able to do it.

    I would recommend trying that with your guys, even if it is with para help in the beginning. I have a few lower students who are able to "match" to fix their schedule, and we give them a laminated schedule card to make their schedule based on the visual. Having the kids do it at the end of the day A) makes them more responsible for "their schedule" B) makes them aware of any "changes" that are coming up (which with my gang is imperative), and C) saves YOUR time and your paras time because it's done before the kids leave!
    I have a large group schedule on our board, that the kids use to recreate their schedules for the next day.
    [​IMG]

    The way ours works is this:

    -All of the kids have their own binders with a heavy divider in them that is the schedule board (Here is the divider - it's from Mayer-Johnson and is super sturdy... they come in packs of 6.) I have a single strip of velcro down the front and back of the divider.

    -The schedule pieces are rectangular, rather than square, as I found this as an easy way to decipher between PECS cards, and schedule cards.
    [​IMG]

    -The schedule is placed on the divider in each binder, from top to bottom. The front side of the divider is the "morning" schedule and the back side of the divider is the "afternoon" schedule. (morning and afternoon are defined by "before lunch" and "after lunch".) [​IMG]

    -I have "match boards" that are located in each corresponding area of the room (anything outside of the room is located on our door). They look like this:

    [​IMG]

    -In my case of OCD color coding, each kid has pieces with outlines in their color.... which helps for knowing who is missing a piece. This can also be accomplished by simply marking initials on the back side of each piece to determine which pieces belong to which kids.

    There are many other ways in which you can do schedules in order to meet your kids individual needs...I figured I'd share a few to see if they ring a bell as to something that would work for you.

    I had a kid in Texas who did not do well with the line drawings - so he used actual photographs. He was on a "start/finish" schedule. He put his pictures on the "finished" side when he finished his activities.
    [​IMG]

    I had another kid in Texas who was very high functioning. He used words on his schedule. He had a modified plastic folder with a hole I cut in the front. Of course, his color was orange. (Me and my color coding...) - At any rate, it works just like the other one, but he places the finished pieces in the finished pocket.
    [​IMG]

    At my previous school, the kids all used the same format I'm using now (with match boards, etc.) but we had a central location for schedules. You can't see their names, but their names are listed above each strip. This was on our bathroom door. This worked well, as the aides were the ones who put the schedules back each day and it's quite simple to get it done when they're all in a row like this. It was also good to have a "transition area" with this group.
    [​IMG]


    I think that's all I have to share for now... hope that helps spark some ideas!!!
     
  5. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2010

    Okay teachersk - you are evil as you post stuff and I keep adding things to do to my way too long list!

    This is what I had been using for individual schedules (the first page was in the front of their personal binder and then the second page in a section for schedule along with an individaulized weekly schedule). Note we didn't color code before either so these are new schedule pieces with the colors on. I had started color coding over the summer so this worked in perfectly.

    [​IMG]

    The problem was nobody was really doing the done part of it and not refering back to them.

    I love your idea of moving the PEC to a different location and then to a finished bin as it will keep people going back to them. I can also continue to use some of the personal schedule and routine booklets that I have with this system (although I'm sure that will be tweaked as we go along.

    Now my next problem was that we have so many different things going on that I couldn't make a card for the wall for each thing. So my solution is 3 cards around the room, 2 at the door that leads outside and 2 at the door that leads in to the rest of the school.

    Here it is:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks so much for posting what you are doing. I think this will actually get students using schedules for us :)
     
  6. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Aug 22, 2010

    I thought I'd put my two cents in since we're sharing personal schedules. I think a lot of it has to do with what the disibility is as well, don't you? For example, students with autism can handle large schedules, but kiddos with MR need just the basics.

    Here's what I do for kiddos with autism:
    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile, here's what I did for my kiddo with MR:
    [​IMG]
    I had just the basic pictures for her and kept them behind her in a small container so I could grab them. In the morning, I set up the 1st four things on her personal little schedule and when it was time for calendar, showed her. She would point to the picture, say the activity, and turn her chair toward calendar. It was amazing.

    So I'm thinking I'm going to do the same thing for my little girls with Downs. Little personal schedules. But I may velcro them to their desks...
     
  7. btteach

    btteach Rookie

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    Aug 22, 2010

    Hey you guys, thanks so much!!!

    Zoom, M2M and teachersk, thanks so much for the great replies and for posting the pix. Your schedule organization has given me so many ideas as well as a direction to go in. And the pix are great, they really help! :):thanks:
     
  8. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2010

    I will take pictures of my kiddos with personal schedules as well - although they are much like Zoom. I have one little guy who just has 2 pictures (leading to a first-then type of thing).
     
  9. Kate Change

    Kate Change Companion

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    Aug 22, 2010

    I agree that it depends on the student. I start my kids with wall schedules, if that's what they are used to and graduate them up to binders because as they progress, I'd like them to move more and more into inclusive settings and I hope that the binder schedules will make this easier.

    I have two students who are still mastering the simple wall schedules and will probably be on them for awhile, but that's OK. They'll get there.
     
  10. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Aug 25, 2010

    i have some i can post when i get home... this will help remind me :)
     

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