Sped Curriculum?????

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by blueyedgirl, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. blueyedgirl

    blueyedgirl New Member

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    Feb 20, 2010

    Hello everyone. I am a 2nd year sped teacher for amazing students with severe and profound disabilities.....I love my job and my students so much but am at wits end with administration. THye seem to have NO clue what they are doing or what direction they are in. My problem is:

    I have SEVERAL very teachable students that are excited and motivated to learn, i have a few that are below that and I have a few that are extremely severe and are mostly there for therapy reasons. However I MUST include all my students in my lesson plans and meet all their IEP goals etc. Which is fine and challenging but I dont know where to go from here. I go back and forth and nothing is ever good. I feel like my advanced students that ARE capable of doing more are not gettin all they can get bc it is impossible to spread my self 15 different ways.....We have no curriculum and I was just curious as to what other schools do without a curriculum? I understand it would be near impossible to have a set curriculum for my students as they are so scattered but it was be nice to have a guide line as to what to teach, the order, etc....I have nothing , i want to teach sight words, multiplication, etc, and have no clue how to begin!

    Just finised up 10 apa's, thought i was goign to have a heart attack, I am ready to get back to "teachign" and leave those behind but want to start with a positive approach

    ANy suggestions woud be great.....

    Discouraged Diana :(
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 20, 2010

    Here's one suggestion. I'm assuming you have an assistant so you may be able to do some small group activities with the more capable students while your assistant works with the more profound ones. If you can identify what grade level would be appropriate for their instruction, go to the Dept of Ed for your state and study the standards for that grade level. That will give you a baseline for skills that particular grade level. Also, can you talk to teachers at your school for the grade level instruction you have chosen and see if they have been provided with curriculum maps for their subjects. Maybe they would give you a pacing guide that they use. They might be able to loan you some textbooks if that would be appropriate.
    Another idea, lots of websites have resources that are divided by grade level. You could print some of those.
    Another thought...contact other teachers in your district who also teach special needs children and see if they have any curriculum they could share with you.
    I also have traditionally had a class of moderate to severe special needs children that is 3-4 times as many children as should be in the class and it is so difficult to meet their needs because my assistant and I can only spread ourselves so far. We try to teach some small group and provide activities for seatwork that are slightly below the other children's instructional level so they can do the work without a lot of intervention on our part. You may be able to provide sensory type activities for seatwork (stringing beads, color and number matching games, small motor practice (cutting, coloring, etc)) with your "not quite as capable" children so you can have a few minutes to work on sight words, multiplication, etc that you have said you would like to do.
    This reply seems a little rambling (the Olympics were on late last night) but, I think you can get the idea. Hope this helps.
     
  4. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Feb 20, 2010

    :welcome: to A to Z, Diana!

    In addition to what swansong said, I find it helpful to hit the academics hard early in the morning when the kiddos have the most energy. And, depending on their age, develop a series of independent centers (or "work stations" for older kiddos), so that you can do small group and one-on-one. I always test my kiddos on general academics (and these are just "tests" that I make up on the fly - - can they say their ABC's? Rote count? To what? Write their name? etc.) Then after I've tested all of them and have a general idea of what they are capable of, I separate them into four different color-coded groups:

    blue: low
    green: low medium
    yellow: more advanced
    red: high

    After they're in their groups, I start introducing the work stations to them based on their level. Pretty soon, they get the hang of it and once they know the routine, with a little assistance from the aide, can get whatever they need when the buzzer goes off. Meanwhile, I've got a group at my table each session and we're working on whatever that group needs math and language arts wise.

    Does that make sense? :blush:
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Feb 21, 2010

    I was also going to suggest that if you have aides, split them up into groups.
     
  6. Evian

    Evian Rookie

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    Feb 25, 2010

    First thing you need to do is assess them. Use the dolch word list to see how many words they actually know. Use flashcards to see what letters of the alphabet they know and don't know. With same flashcards you can assess what letter sounds they know or don't know. If they know all of their letter sounds start to teach them vowel and consonant digraphs. You can assign them sight words. They could write simple sentences using a word processor or a paper and pencil. You can use flashcard with picture of what the word is. This will help them learn what objects are called and how they are spelled. If they can count to ten you are in good shape especially if they are able to use their hands to show you the number two or four. I personally don't allow my kids to use manipulatives. I prefer teaching them how to count using their fingers. Once you have all this input use it. Now you have your baseline (starting point). Begin at their baseline and move forward. You will find that some of the kids can be grouped together. Group them and divide your class into math and reading groups. Assign your aides to one or two groups. Give your aides clear written instructions of what you want them to do based on the benchmarks you have created in their IEPs or from their baseline. Constant repetition is the only way they are going to retain it. Don't be one of those teachers that thinks well we spent one month on adding now it is time to do subtraction when the child hasn't mastered adding yet. If you have a child that is unable to use his finger due to Cerebral Palsy, do what I did get her or him an oversized calculator and a 10 inch diameter paper plate with a hole punched out to allow only one problem to be displayed. This stops the student from getting lost while doing her assignment.
     
  7. spedhart

    spedhart New Member

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    Aug 10, 2010

    Start with assessment. Find the student's baseline skill and work from there. There are books out there that have task analysis skills in them. I have an old one I use. It lays out basic skills for each content area.
     
  8. supermissf

    supermissf Rookie

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    Aug 10, 2010

    Check out SRA-McGraw Hill's website under Direct Instruction. Best curricula out there for students with processing difficulties; systematic and explicit, integrated lessons. Reading Mastery and Connecting Math Concepts are two of my favs.
     
  9. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2010

    SRA doesn't work well with my kids at all. Since the op teaches lower kids, I am concerned it's not a good idea. It requires good receptive language.

    I may have missed it, but how old are your students?
     
  10. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Yeah, SRA doesn't work for my guys either.
     
  11. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Hi Discouraged Diana. Fifteen students with this much variation is ability IS A LOT! What age are they and how many learning assistants do you have in the room?
     
  12. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Aug 11, 2010

    This is an old thread, but I just wanted to chime in that I am dumping SRA this year for my lowest students. It doesn't work for them at all.
     

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