Special Education Across the Country?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by kiraj, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. kiraj

    kiraj Companion

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    Aug 5, 2007

    Hi!

    I've been reading these postings with interest. I guess I was under the impression it was only Oregon having a shortage, but apparantly I'm wrong! I switched to Special Ed so I would have an easier time finding a job (and because I love it too!). I can tell general ed jobs at all levels are scarce here just from my search. I was lucky, and found my dream job in May. My first three interviews were successful and I ended up with an offer from each. I was even being recruited from other districts, so had to deactivate my application. Everyone in my 25 member grad school cohort already has a position.

    How is it in the rest of the country for special education? My husband and I have cosidered the idea of relocating after a couple years, so I'm curiuos what the job market is like across the country.


    *By the way, I'm sorry some of you are having such a hard time. I love teaching, so I can understand how dissappointing it must feel. I'm sure the perfect job will come along for everyone of you though. And if anyone is interested in moving to Oregon to teach sped, it's a great place to be!
     
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  3. rookieABC123

    rookieABC123 Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2007

    I live in PA and having a Special Ed. certificate can definitely help your chances of finding a job faster. I am not sure if there is a shortage--but I believe there is a need.
     
  4. nicegirl

    nicegirl Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2007

    I am SPED in Texas. This will be my first year teaching, but I had no trouble finding a job after completing my alt. cert program. I do know that SPED is listed under a critical shortage area in Texas. Also, if you can handle the heat, the cost of living is pretty inexpensive here. Good Luck!
     
  5. KRaeLamb

    KRaeLamb Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2007

    I am in West Virginia...I can't speak for all of the counties here, because we are all ran individually, but in my county our shortage areas are: Math, Special Education, Science, Spanish, Latin and Reading Specialist.

    I graduated with an Elem. degree K-6 with a certificate in Oral Com. grades 5-9. When I went to my county to drop off my papers our hiring director looked at me and said," Do you want to get a full-time job in the next 6 years? If so, go register for a graduate program in one of our shortage areas. If you don't....you'll be subbing for years!". So, needless to say, I went that very day and declared a MA in Special Education Mulit-Categorical Studies (LD, BD, MI and Autism). I was hired the very next board meeting!!!

    I had to work as a LTS first....I graduated in December and its hard to find a job mid year. However, I knew in March where I would be the following August.

    My story isn't that rare around here either. I can safely say that this is the case for 4 other teachers at my school as well as AT LEAST 4 others I graduated with.

    I never thought I'd like SpEd....but I love it!!!! I am so glad that I decided to try another field.

    If you're looking for a job...you might want to make a trip to your county/district and start asking around.
     
  6. mincc

    mincc Companion

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    Aug 5, 2007

    In NJ, there is NOT a shortage at the elementary level of special ed. Every interview I had, there were hundreds of resumes for only one opening. The highest-650 apps for 2 openings. This happens in the public schools, but even the private schools for ED and BD students receive quite a bit of resumes. I had a couple of interviews with those and the principals had received over 100 resumes. From talking with friends and admins, what has happened is people could not find elementary jobs in general ed., so they got the sped. endorsement.

    There is however, a better chance if you want to teach autistic students and the severely/profoundly disabled, esp. in private school settings. There is definitely an increase in autistic programs and more schools are being built for these students.

    The middle school and secondary sped levels are more open, but there really is not a shortage now in anything here. It is a terrible market.
     
  7. kiraj

    kiraj Companion

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    Wow, that's really interesting! Thanks for sharing! At this point I am doing the severe/moderate group including autism, but I'm endorsed for any special ed K-21. I wonder what the market for teaching in general will be in the next 5-10 years? I always here about the predicted shortage due to mass retirement, but I just can't see it happening.
     
  8. rookieABC123

    rookieABC123 Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2007

    There is a lot of talk here about in PA and especially in districts in my area about giving teachers early incentives to retire. I talked with someone from admin. the other day and he is already saying he knows of 12 retiring next year at his school. I think our day may be coming!!:D
     
  9. KRaeLamb

    KRaeLamb Rookie

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    Yeah, I have heard of that too. You get free insurance for a year if you decide to retire before Feb. Or, you can turn in your sick days for pay. Something like that (I'm not really sure).....I haven't heard of anyone doing it though.
     
  10. rookieABC123

    rookieABC123 Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2007

    There is hope in PA--this is what is happening in our state and it looks promising for us!
    Early retirement bills supported by western Pa. lawmakers

    Cheers of support heard throughout Capitol as Daley introduces 30-and-Out legislation



    HARRISBURG, April 19 -- Cheers of “30 and Out” could be heard in the state Capitol yesterday as state Rep. Peter J. Daley exhorted a crowd of teachers and state employees at his “Rally in the Rotunda for Retirement.”



    “Our primary objective here is to create jobs and keep our young people in Pennsylvania. With both bills combined, 14,000 new jobs will be given back to the state. Right now, we are lagging being and exporting our youth all over the country to find jobs. We want them to stay here and raise their families,” Daley said.



    Joining Daley on the Rotunda steps in support of the two bills were western Pennsylvania Reps. Tim Solobay, Deberah Kula, Mark Longietti, Jarret Gibbons and Ted Harhai, as well as another dozen Democratic and Republican legislators from across the state, and Wes Johnson, president of SEIU local 668. Longietti and Johnson joined Daley at the speaker’s podium. The bills have a total of 60 cosponsors.



    Kula said, “I’ve seen too many young people in my area leave for North Carolina, Nevada and other states because they could not find a job. At the same time, retirees want to transition into other careers or retire, but are unable.”



    “This is a win-win situation because it would allow teachers and state employees who are ready to leave the system to do so and create jobs for our young people while saving money in the form of lower starting salaries for new employees,” Solobay said.



    SEIU’s Johnson said, “We support these bills and are eager to work shoulder to shoulder with Representative Daley and other members to get this legislation passed.”



    Daley explained that H.B. 230 is an early retirement bill for teachers and H.B. 231 is an early retirement bill for the state employees. The proposal requires two separate bills because of the different administrative provisions in each.



    Harhai said, “This bill has three distinct benefits: it gives our veteran teachers peace of mind so they can retire when they’re ready to move on or end their careers; it opens doors for our young teachers, many of whom were educated in Pennsylvania colleges, but otherwise might need to leave the state to find a job; and it provides budgetary relief for school districts by bringing in younger teachers at a lower salary.”



    Both bills would offer two-year “windows” and early retirement without penalty. Criteria for the early retirement would be either 30 or more years of service, or a combination of age and years of service equal to 80. The two window target dates are March 1 to June 1 in both 2008 and 2009.



    “They always say ‘the third time’s a charm,’” Daley said, noting that this is the third consecutive session that he has introduced legislation aimed at early retirement.
     
  11. Carebear05

    Carebear05 Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2007

    SPED jobs here are def. easier to get and find. It is so needed here because not that many people go into it. When I went to the job fair back in Feb. , 2 of the districts I interviewed with asked me if I would ever consider doing SPED because at the time I was working as an aide in a High Needs class. They usually start hiring SPED people here around April and May whereas reg. ed they hire in late May, June, July etc., because they know that it is hard to find people who want to teach SPED. I think people who go into SPED usually get jobs straight out of college moreso than people who are reg. ed.
     
  12. Deb06

    Deb06 Companion

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    Aug 6, 2007

    There is a huge shortage of special education teachers in my area of Ohio. Last year was my first year of teaching, and I am positive if I had not gotten my Special Education certification, I would not have found a job. I really enjoyed teaching special education and it was a good way to get into the school system. I've noticed that nearby counties in West Virginia also have many special education postings still up for bid.
     

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