Speaking of Ability Grouping....

Discussion in 'General Education' started by KinderCowgirl, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jul 6, 2010

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  3. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Jul 6, 2010

    There are several schools within my district (so think very small scale here, maybe 3) where each kid has an IEP. Not a legal one, but a plan that was based on testing and that has measurable, observable academic, social and behavioral goals that must be met. Parents are involved in the meetings, just like a regular IEP, that occur once a year, near the child's birthday.
     
  4. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    This really does sound Montessori. Good luck to them.
     
  5. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Jul 8, 2010

    Many High schools in the UK group according to ability. Some teachers don't like it but the majority see the benefits. In most schools higher ability kids are taught in larger than average groups (30) as the behaviour tends to be better and the work can go at a faster pace, the kids can be extended more easily. The less able are taught in smaller than average groups (8 to 15) and support in the form of classroom assistants can be targetted more effectivly so these kids have a far lower adult/student ratio. The work set can also be targetted more effectivly. It also can happen that students who are say very good at Maths can be in a high group but in a lower group for another subject.
     
  6. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Well, being a Montessori teacher, it's not really like Montessori because the materials aren't being used, but following each child individually and meeting him/her where s/he is is definitely a Montessori principle.

    It will be interesting to see how this works. I only hope that for children who are struggling with reading, they'll still know to have these children tested and remediated instead of solely relying on the classroom teacher to remediate these children. Some of them are going to need specific tactics to get to where they need to be.
     
  7. Chalk

    Chalk Companion

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    Jul 8, 2010

    How will whole class instruction work in this teaching model?

    If all students are working at their own pace, what is the role of the teacher and the classroom?

    IN others words, will teachers set up classes similar to college where students will sign up for the class based on the level of difficulty or if they have met prerequisites?

    Should there be concern that students in th elementary levels will end up being grouped the same way they were in the 80's which research has proven was detrimental to the lower achieving students as well as racial and socioeconomically biased?

    Just curious if anyone can give us some perspective on the real effectiveness of this program from the lower achievement student point of view since the news article only looked at a high achiever?
     

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