sound blending

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by diggerdeb, Mar 20, 2011.

  1. diggerdeb

    diggerdeb Comrade

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    Mar 20, 2011

    How do you teach-practice-review sound blending?

    I say /p/ /i/ /g/ . the child needs to say pig.
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Mar 20, 2011

    We start with continuous letter sounds and stretch them out really long. So, sssssssssaaaaaaaaaaammmmmmmmm. Make the word basically blend together. Then move on to just giving the sounds when the students get better at this.

    I also tell the students to "Say it fast." This let's them know that it is time for the to reply.
     
  4. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Mar 20, 2011

    You could also have them use a body movement. For the initial sound, touch your shoulder, middle sound touch your inner elbow, final sound touch your wrist. To blend it together sweep your hand down you arm. So it would look like this.
    /p/ shoulder
    /I/ inner elbow
    /g/ wrist
    Pig sweep down arm to show blending

    This works with many kids. Or give them the phonemes plus a few seconds of wait time before you give them the signal to blend. How are they at phoneme segmentation?
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Mar 20, 2011

    Also, having a visual representation in the form of actual letters. I've used magnetic tiles before, where kids can slide the letters together, or simply move their fingers over the letters as say the sound, going increasingly fast.

    Mopar has an excellent point as well - many struggling readers struggle with blending because they pause in between each sound, which 1) makes it harder to blend, and 2) often introduces new phonemes into the mix (for example, if you're pronouncing "pat" but only say the /p/ sound, a lot of kids say "puh" instead of just /p/ which makes blending even harder). So, making sure kids don't stop sounding out in between each letter.

    Other than that, your mind is the limit in terms of creativity - for example, you could draw a "p" "i" and "g" on construction paper, and take it to the floor. Have kids step to each subsequent letter as they sound out. There are those letter tiles that walmart/staples sells. You can use a laser pointer and let the kids trace (this one can get out of hand :) ). Shaving cream. Sand trays.

    A lot of these ideas are writing/phonics activities, but can be used with blending because teaching blending often occurs in the context of phonics instruction, and good beginning spelling/writing instruction often occurs in the context of phonics instruction too (in part).
     
  6. Kindergarten31

    Kindergarten31 Cohort

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    Mar 21, 2011

    Blending just seems to build from all the skills taught from the beginning of the year. This year I tried modelling blending right away, even if they weren't ready to learn it and they got used to hear me doing it. When it came down to actually teaching them how to blend, this group seemed to get it easier. I also use a Jack Hartman song, about stretching words out and snapping them back and it helps with the concept. Some kids get it right away and others have difficulty with the concept.
     
  7. Bri120

    Bri120 Rookie

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    Mar 22, 2011

    If I am teaching CVC words at the rug or the reading group table I make sure I have my white board and magnetic letters. I draw a picture of a slide. The first C goes at the top of the slide, the V goes next to it and the ending C sits at the bottom. We say the sounds and make sure we really drag out the vowel. Then we get to actually drag the vowel down the slide so it "crashes" into the second C. The kids love this and soon you'll find them dragging the vowel sound out without the "slide" visual.
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Mar 22, 2011

    I like that visualization. I might have to steal it!
     
  9. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2011

    Bri120 & Kat53 I like both of your ideas.
     
  10. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2011

    yep I have a promethean board flipchart with the slide to do this - but remember this is a step that goes from phonemic awareness to phonics.
     

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