Son retained to 2nd grade.

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by kmom, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 8, 2006

    :( I am not happy about this and seriously try not to think about it. I just hate thinking of him repeating the second grade all over again while he sees all of his friends from last year in third grade. I feel like the only parent who's child is being retained.

    I'm not sure what option to take now. I could hire a tutor but would that work? He's in summer school now. I feel like I haven't been as aggressive as I should be. I have a tendency to just take what people give me and move on just accepting the situation.

    With you guys being teachers can you give me some insight on what it means for a child to be retained? What do I do. What questions should I ask?

    I'm at a loss and not sure where to turn. Thanks in advance!
     
  2.  
  3. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jun 9, 2006

    I know this is a hard thing to deal with. As a teacher, it is one of the hardest things I've had to do. First, make sure you stay positive with your son. Don't let him see himself as a failure. In the lower grades it is usually very easy for them to meld into their new class. I teach 5th and I can't tell you how many times I've been surprised to discover a child that is an honor roll student repeated 1st or 2nd. It doesn't show. See how he does at summer school. Talk to his teacher and see what they feel about his weak areas. A tutor, to strengthen those areas might not be a bad idea. He will most likely have a much easier, much smoother year this year. Let him enjoy those successes. Good luck!!
     
  4. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    I am trying to be positive. Yesterday when he got his hair cut, the lady asked him what grade he was going to and he didn't want to say. It hurt my feelings to see him slightly embarrassed to say he was repeating the second grade.

    I try to encourage him and it may not seem that way from my post. He likes summer school and everything. I'm just worried about him being the tallest one there and feeling bad about being in 2nd grade again. As far as a tutor, a lot of them seem to be really expensive and my tight budget can't afford one now.

    I'm going to have to be his tutor until I can get one for him. Tried Sylvan but they wanted a newborn and a left kidney to tutor him.
    Wayyyy too much money for something that may or may not work.

    Is there a way I can help him in his weak areas I'm not aware of, Reading Comp, Math, Science and Social studies?

    Thanks in advance
     
  5. HannahB2

    HannahB2 Companion

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    In my experience with my students that went to Sylvan, it didn't work. I think a parent is the best tutor. I'm not sure how you want to do it but you could go to your local book store and pick up some Grade 2 or 3 workbooks for him to practice with. You should do a page ( or how many you want ) per subject per night. Once a week or once a day read him a short story & after ask him questions about the book.

    I used to teach 2nd grade so if you need anymore information, ideas, or help, feel free to PM, e-mail, or IM me (Yahoo! Messenger).

    Hannah =]
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 9, 2006

    I'm in totally over my head here-- I'm HS math-- so please feel free to disregard.

    My son is just finishing 2nd grade. For the record, he's already the
    2nd tallest-- just genes I guess (He's adopted, so I'm not sure. It could be too many Happy meals!!) So don't let the size thing be an issue. Someone has to be tallest-- it will be him until one of the girls has a growth spurt. Brian is already taller than the 3rd grader across the street.

    For the haircutter, the mailmand and anyone else, he's going into 2nd grade. No further explanation is necessary.

    Some kids learn to ride a two wheeler at age 4. Others don't learn until they're 8. Your son just needs his academic training wheels a bit longer. Don't make it about being embarassed or ashamed-- and don't let him either. He did nothing wrong This is to help him, not punish him. Work hard on his self image. Remind him of all the things he's good at!

    It seems as though most of the work Brian did this year centered around reading. Science, social studies-- it all boiled down to reading. So I would suggest a nightly snuggle- the two of you, an hour, and he reads to you. Sports Illustrated, National Geographic Kids, whatever...I'm sure the other elementary teachers here have some great book suggestions; otherwise ask the librarian.

    Good luck, and hang in there!!
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jun 9, 2006

    kmom, what is your son interested in?
     
  8. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    I'm sure that as Mom you feel pretty upset , however, I think that your son will benefit greatly from the retention. He will be getting that extra practice he needs.
    I think you can be your son's tutor and be very succesful at it!!! As others have suggested.... READ AND READ SOME MORE. If you show your son that you are interested, I bet he will be too. Try to find stories that he will enjoy. Have him retell the story to you in his own words, this will cue you in on whether he understood what he was reading. Review sight words, practice new vocabulary. The activities are endless. Just a side note, there are some workbooks that are not costly that you could use as practice with your son also. I wouldn't rely on worksheets, but for times when you don't have as much practice time they would help.
    Good Luck and stay positive.:)
     
  9. adria

    adria Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    You may feel bad now but in the future you will have no regrets. Although your child is going back in second grade he will become an expert, a more fluent reader when he gets in third grade he will be confident and he will take off in third grade. Don't be surprise if he passes the students down who went in third grade. Read twenty mins each day, talk about the story and ask some questions, do vocabulary games and in the meantime talk to your child and explain to him what had happened. Don't blame yourself, just do you part now..use this summer to the fullest prepare him for second grade. Think of it has having an upper hand because you know what to expect...good luck
     
  10. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    I actually bought the workbooks for 2nd and 3rd grade in phonics, math, spelling and reading. But we were not consistent. But I will do that. Regarding the reading, we signed up for the summer reading program at our local library. A really great one by the way. He likes gross boy books like Captain Underpants and Goosebumps. But I will resume our daily studies in the workbooks.

    Thanks for the help!
     
  11. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006


    Thanks for the help. He likes when I read to him. He gets his bear (he's had this bear since being a newborn, shhh don't tell anybody or it will risk his manhood LOL) then he gets under the covers with his thumb in his mouth and listens to me read.

    We'll have to do this nightly though. Thanks again.
     
  12. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    Really.....TV and Video games and playing outside.

    I just found this website I think call funbus or something like that where they have math problems that look like video games. He really enjoyed it! I was surprised. So I will be looking for more computer video games like that.
     
  13. Lesley

    Lesley Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    Just work with him. I know it is hard, I pulled my son out of second and put him back into first a few weeks after school started. It was a difficult choice, but it was the best choice. He is now going to enter third grade with A's and 1 B on the report card. No one recalls or mentions that he was put back a grade. He is very proud of himself and his self esteem is booming. Once the idea settles and both of you stop dwelling on it it becomes easier to 'deal' with. Pat yourself on the back for putting his success before other people's impressions and reactions. There are more people out there than you realize that are being retained or were retained, but I know how you feel that you are the only one. Good Luck
     
  14. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Jun 9, 2006

    I can't tell you how many fifth graders I've had who should have been retained early one but weren't. They face a constant struggle. It's sad because they may have not had to face that struggle if their parents were just courageous enough to let them be placed where they belonged. How do you feel about his social situation, though? That is important. Do you think he will fit in with the younger group? For many kids, it is a better fit and works to their advantage.

    Don't let your child know that it breaks your heart to see this! Be matter of fact about it and say that every child needs to be in the class in which they will do best. Don't push the workbooks too hard in the summer. You don't want him to feel like it's drudge work. Encourage the reading. Ask him questions about what he's read, ask him to retell the story, form opinions about the characters and how the story turned out. A friend of mine who retained her child in second because she said she "just seemed more like a second grader". She never regretted it.

    Height means nothing. The youngest child in my class was 10 and taller than me at the end of the year. I've seen 7th graders no taller than some 2nd graders, while some 8th graders shave already.
     
  15. mrsmoore

    mrsmoore Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    I would recommend staying positive with him. I had to retain a boy in second grade this year. When I talked with him about it in the classroom, he was actually excited. He even bragged to his friends that he was going to have me again as a teacher. But, it was a different story at home with his parents. He did not want others outside of school to know what grade he was going to be in next year. So, I would definitely recommend staying positive.

    Read with him and make it fun and interesting! James Marshall books, like Fox Outfoxed. They are funny 'boy' books that would probably make him feel more successful. If you have any questions, feel free to PM me!!

    Good luck! It sounds like you are on the right track by working with him so much!
     
  16. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,285
    Likes Received:
    754

    Jun 9, 2006

    If your child is behind in second, I think letting him have another year in second (as well as all the extra work you are doing with him) is one of the best gifts you can give him.

    I taught third grade for eight years, and there were many kids who needed to be retained in earlier grades, but weren't. I had to put a child back in second after the first few weeks of third grade, and I thought that had to be hard for that kiddo. The second grade teacher had wanted to retain the little boy, but the parents refused. I think it would have been easier just to retain him in the first place. When he came back to third the next year, he did well. Another year of second grade was just what he needed to succeed in third. He's now a straight a student in junior high.



    Kmom, it might make you feel better if you looked at what your son is expected to do in February of his third grade year. In third and fifth grade, kids must pass the reading tests in order to be promoted to the next grade, and in fifth grade the kids must also have to pass the math test.

    http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/resources/release/taks/index.html

    These are the standards for what is taught each year. In second grade reading, pay close attention to TEKS 2.9A-2.9I and 2.11A-2.11J as those are reading comprehension standards.
    http://www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/index.html
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jun 9, 2006

    Hm - you might look for kids' graphic novels, too - there's still plenty of storyline. There's a video learning series called Adventure Workshop that's pretty good - anything with the Zoombinis is a winner in my book, and sequencing is among the science skills that is also a reading skill. It might also be that he'd be engaged by some of the nifty science books from publishers like Usborne, Dorling Kindersley, and Kingfisher. (Some of these are books I recommend for grownups taking tests that include science...) It wouldn't surprise me to find that there are kids' books that explore the world of video games and how they're made - books like that might also go over well.

    I thoroughly agree with the various posters who've suggested heavier emphasis on getting your boy engaged in reading.
     
  18. ppax

    ppax Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006


    Be sure to think this option through carefully. A classroom culture develops and inserting a student into it after it has already begun to gel can be just one more hurdle for you to overcome.
     
  19. ppax

    ppax Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    Students are retained when grade level expectations are not met to the degree that success in the next grade level is in serious jeopardy. It may not be restricted to just academic, but social or behavioral involvement additionally.

    I congratulate you on seeking out options to help your son. An involved and consistent parent is a tremendous strength for the student.

    I would absolutely be asking lots of very specific questions. It concerns me that you are not quite sure of what being retained means. Sit down with somebody immediately to discuss this situation and have them explain EVERYTHING to you. Find out things like, what areas is he having trouble in and then follow up and make the teacher go nitty gritty (without being defensive if possible). If a teacher makes the excruciating decision to retain a student, then they should have PLENTY of reason for this that they can both document and explain. For example, if a teacher says he is behind in his reading ask:
    1. What level is he currently reading at and when was the last assessment? What level is he expected to be reading at right now and at the beginning of the school year next year? What types of difficulty is he having with reading? Does he struggle with fluency? Does he need to develop comprehension? Does he need to develop decoding strategies? When he reads a word, does he tend to sound out what he sees, use context to help figure out meaning, or use syntax to alert him to an error? Does he recognize that he is making errors or consistently reading right through them oblivious to the mistakes? (A strategy is to read through something you don't understand, and then go back to see if it helps to make sense of it. There is a difference between a student doing this and a student who has no idea that mistakes are being made.) As you can see, the more specific the questions, the more specific you can get when helping your son or enlisting the help of a tutor.

    I agree that Sylvan is not always effective, but always expensive. But with that said, a tutor can make a huge difference. Find a tutor who will work one on one with your son and very consistently. Set up a summer program individualized for your son's needs. If you find a certified teacher tutor is too expensive, try going to the high school and find an honor student that has an interest in teacher. If you can get the classroom teacher to oversee the highschool tutor it will help give direction and goals. Often times just extra sessions of one on one support can be extremely helpful.

    This is IN ADDITION to nightly and consistent support from you. You are the primary tutor here! Ask yourself when you help, are you helping him to understand concepts, or feeding him answers and doing the work "for him". Helping his is what you are looking for! Parents who write the papers for students, solve the math problems for students, etc. are only teaching their student that he or she cannot do it, but mom or dad can so sit back and relax.

    At the end of the summer, if he has made excellent progress in the areas cited by the teacher insist that he be reevaluated for placement.

    Has he been tested for any learning disabilities? Involved in reading support programs? Find out what is available through your school, district, and county and pursue it.

    Also, listen carefully to what the teacher is saying. If he or she is recommending summer school, take him. If a trip to a physician is recommended, take him. Specific reading goals every night? Be sure to meet them every night.

    Lastly, the event at the hairdresser will reoccur in different forms. Role play this and provide your son with the words he needs to address this. Practice it so that he is comfortable and confident in his response.

    As mentioned in other posts, stay positive. Give him specific praise when he works on his school work ("great job Johnny" is a lot different than "Wow! You were really stuck on that problem. I love how you tried it this way first, stuck with it and tried it this way, still stuck with it and tried it this way and solved it!"

    Kids are brilliant. All of them. He will pick up on your feelings about the situation so find ways for you to be positive about what is happening, be specific on goals and the positive small steps he is making toward the goals, and above all let him know he is loved and cherished for just being him, no strings attached.
     
  20. novalyne

    novalyne Rookie

    Joined:
    May 29, 2006
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 9, 2006

    One of my 5th graders this year was also retained in 2nd grade. This year he got a "commended" ranking and the highest score in all of the fifth grade on the state science exam. He is a really creative and smart kid...he just wasn't quite ready yet to move on when he finished 2nd grade. Developmentally, primary kids can be all over the map...sometimes, the extra time and a little bit of extra help is all they need. I think you're doing exactly the right thing to give him the best opportunity to be successful moving on!

    Hope this helps!
     
  21. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    WOW! Thanks for all of the advice. I just got home from work so I'm sorry I have not replied before now. Budget time is horrible!

    Well I've looked over all of the suggestions and I made the decision that until I can get funds for a tutor, I'm going to have to step up my game.

    I thank everyone who has posted so far for the suggestions. He seems to be okay about everything if I don't harp on it like a loon. And he's VERY sensative so I have to be careful how I speak to him and my expressions and gestures.


    I do have another question. Are children who are retained given the same teacher or a different one? I liked his teacher but I feel that he needs a new environment but I could be wrong. And is there anything done differently with a retained child or do they just do a go through all over again with no changes in teaching or curriculum?

    Thanks again!
     
  22. flteacher7

    flteacher7 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    Kmom,

    I've been reading this thread and didn't reply because I had replied to a similar question on another thread about a first grader being retained (this was a few weeks ago - you could read that one if you'd like!) Anyway, I saw your question regarding the teacher. I agree with you that usually it is good to have a retained student placed into a different environment (i.e. different teacher) for a variety of reasons. Maybe another teacher will be able to help your son in a different way, or will provide different activities so that he won't have to do all the same projects and things all over again. I know you are concerned that other students will question why he is in second grade again, and keeping the same teacher might be a little more obvious. I've retained students in first grade, and when they go to another first grade class and the question comes up, I say usually say that they "are in a different class just like you are this year." I don't specify anything about grade level.

    On the other hand, if he does have the same teacher, and he responds well to him/her you could request to keep him in the class. This teacher will know his strengths and weaknesses, and be able to help him specifically with what he needs without having to do a whole variety of assessments (although I would make sure that this teacher would re-assess him after the long summer and both of your hard work!)

    I once had a student who was retained placed in my classroom due to a parent's request - I had no problem with it, and she really thrived. She was able to be a helper to some of the other students, but I was careful to make sure to provide her with activities that would challenge her and be different from the ones we did the previous year. She is now entering sixth grade and is at the top of her class! :)

    As for the curriculum, this will most likely stay the same unless the school has adopted a new reading, writing, math, science, or social studies series (which is usually done every 5 - 7 years from what I have experienced). But in our county in Florida, all students who are retained must have an AIP (academic improvement plan) which highlights that areas that the students needs help with (for example in reading - fluency, comprehension, phonics, etc.) and what the teacher and school will do in order to provide him extra help to reach his goals (it could be as simple as a peer tutor or perhaps a school remediation program). Sometimes when I receive a student who has been retained and just needed a little bit more time to catch up, the "AIP" is just used as a monitoring tool. This student don't really need any extra intervention programs or anything - just a little more time to develop appropriate grade-level skills.

    Anyway, sorry to go on and on. Your school might have a policy regarding the placement of retained students, so it is your right to ask if there is a choice in placing him in a different class (which I think is what you are leaning towards). Make sure that the next year's teacher will challenge him, especially in areas that he had done well in this year in second grade, so that he doesn't get bored, and continue to read with him daily even if he catches up relatively quickly!

    As most people on the board have said, it really is in your son's best interest to give him a little more time to catch up. By the time he goes to third grade he will be a strong student, confident, and most likely will do very well! Thank you for being understanding, and for doiung what is in your child's best interest. HAPPY READING THIS SUMMER!!!
     
  23. ppax

    ppax Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006

    Good evening!

    This varies by school/district. In the building I work a retained child is always assigned to another teacher. Additionally, parental input is considered and usually there is a meeting regarding placement for the following year which discusses his needs and the best match for a teacher.

    If funds for a tutor is an issue, check with the high school. In my home district the high school kids are required to complete a minimum of 40 hours of volunteer service, so that would be free for you. Also, if you have a college or university near you that offers a teacher preparation program they may have something in place for tutoring. If they don't, try posting a note on a bulletin board located in the building where most of the education classes are held saying that you need a volunteer tutor and see if someone steps up that way. Many times pre-service teachers are looking for opportunities to gain experience. Finally, local organizations sometimes offer free tutoring such as boys/girls club, local churches, etc.
     
  24. ppax

    ppax Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2006


    You mentioned that he likes Captain Underpants and Goosebumps. In all likelyhood these are above his reading level, so they should be enjoyed together. Look for books that he can read where 90% or more of the words he reads are accurate and read these together (he reads, you support). For books where he is accurate at 95% or more he can read these independently, with follow up questions. Keep in mind that if you don't read the book, you can still question. Ask what happened in the beginning, middle, end, about characters, setting, feelings, what he has in common with the story or how the story has something in common with someone he knows, etc.

    A few nice series for second grade or so are the Frog and Toad series, Nate the Great, and Henry and Mudge. The local librarian could also steer you toward popular books for the age group.
     
  25. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jun 10, 2006

    If he likes Captain Underpants, he might do well with Jane Yolen's Commander Toad series, which is a very droll parody of both Star Trek and Star Wars and contains some delightfully awful puns.
     
  26. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 10, 2006

    I was going to suggest calling the Ed. department at a local university. Someone beat me to it. ;) Those college students need the extra experience and a little extra cash too.
    I also had a student that was as tall as me (5'7) and one of the youngest ones in the class. I wouldn't worry about height. Our school will place the retained student in a different classroom than they were previously in.
    Spend some time at the local Library or a book store. You don't have to buy everything, you can just spend some quality reading time in there. Also, working on the computer can be helpful too. Here is a link to our school website with lots of educational games. If you like them, save the link to the games on your favorites. I'm not sure how much longer this link on our website will be available. We are all moving around to different positions (we had a new school open), so they are going to combine it with another. Hope that made sense. Anyway, here's the link.
    http://web.sssd.k12.ar.us/southside-east/studentlinks.htm
     
  27. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Jun 10, 2006

    kmom- regarding book choice: Goosebumps is rather advanced reading for a second grader. Captain Underpants, while the kids like it, is just plain garbage. There is great literature available that would help him in developing fluency and comprehension. You have to find out his reading level and then choose books at that level. Read, read, reread...What level does his teacher see him?
     
  28. cberles

    cberles Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006


    Gross boy books work for the reluctant reader! Also, try TIME WARP TRIO by Jon Scezka (Stinky Cheese Man, Frog Prince contiued) - these are funny for all and they are in a series which, if he enjoys, will keep him hooked on reading.:)
     
  29. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Jun 25, 2006

    Time Warp Trio is level 'P' which in my district is grade 3. My 2nd grade highest readers can handle these but not my strugglers. Good for a read aloud to get a kid interested in books but not independent reading for a child being retained.
     
  30. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    789
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006

    Okay I hope I'm not repeating too much--I just couldn't read all the posts.

    I agree with Adria (in #8) once his second year of 2nd grade is over you won't regret it for a minute. He will make a whole new set of friends, have big kid friends in 3rd grade too ("Wow! You have 3rd grade friends?"). Hello? The tallest kid gets to stand in the back row for concerts and programs/class pictures, that is the coolest! Use moments like the hairdresser thing as a teachable moment. Remind him they don't know him and won't know the difference. This is not a failure for you either. Some kids are just not ready for things. It could be a late birthday or just a developmental thing. It is no one's fault. I hope you don't take my words to mean I'm discounting your feelings please. I DON'T want to downplay these concerns because I really, honestly think this will be turned around for good!
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Jun 25, 2006

    Great advice Viola!
     
  32. Lanie

    Lanie Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2003
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006

    What are the reasons the teacher gave you for retaining your child? Also, has the decision already been made if your child has finished second grade? At our school, placement decisions (by the teacher and parents) are made before the end of the current year and advancement/retention information is included on the fourth quarter report card. Retention isn't based on getting a tutor or taking summer school classes after the school year is finished. Does that make sense?
     
  33. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006

    That's right. I used the first book in the series with my reading remediation class last year. I didn't make them read it, I read it to them as a read aloud. We would start each class off with a chapter from the book. They loved it and really got into reading after that. They hadn't found anything that they enjoyed reading. I got in trouble the one day I forgot to bring the book. I had to promise to bring it the next day.
    Another good series is the "Magic Tree House" series by Mary Pope Osborne. My kids just can't put them down. They are a level "M" which is a end of 2nd grade level.
     
  34. kamteach5

    kamteach5 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006

    My son turns 16 in September and he will be a junior. I really debated about starting him in school but everybody said he's five, he's ready, he's bright, you have to start him, etc., etc. As we went along I knew he was not ready socially and I begged his teachers to retain him. Everyboy said he's ready, he's bright, etc., etc., and so we kept plugging away. It caught up to him in junior high. I really think I did him a disservice by pushing him along. he will only be 17 when he graduates. He just doesn't fit in and most of his friends are younger. He never felt he could compete in sports. And I feel he just wasn't ready. (The good news-he won't drive until he is a junior.)
     
  35. bluefish

    bluefish New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006

    I teach kindergarten and was retained in school. Not being the "best" learner has made me a better teacher. I understand a lot of the frustration kids feel in school. When you decide which books and and workbooks he should use, try to make them things he enjoys. If he hasn't been successful in school, he would benefit from seeing joy in learning. If he loves the Captain Underpants series, by all means let him read them. They aren't good literature, but he'll learn to love reading better literature. Have him retell you the silly plots from those books. If getting a tutor works better for you, do that. I know I have a very difficult time working with my daughter since we are both hard-headed. Keep the summer and at home learning fun; read the things he loves, go to museums, be active, talk with him and have fun.
     
  36. Pixiewannabe

    Pixiewannabe Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2006

    I'm glad to hear that you want to stay positive about it! To start my mom was told to hold me back in Kindergarten but since I was switching school districts she had me placed in 1st grade anyway. I was always behind and although it really helps me when it comes to working with kids, the teacher was right and my mom should of held me back, it would of made my job as a student much easier.
    I think that it is important to tell you child when asked what grade he will be in just say 2nd and let the person assume he just finished 1st. Also when he goes back to school most likely his fellow classmates won't know that he was held back, they will just think that he is new. Bonus of repeating his that he will find success and be motivated to try harder. Good luck with everything.
    Justine
     
  37. MrsMikesell

    MrsMikesell Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 26, 2006

    Hi!

    I teach Kindergarten and this year I had everything from two 7 year olds (retained in K) to a 4 year old (promoted from pre-k).

    The kids knew each other's ages, but it didn't seem to matter. They genuinely accepted and respected each other no matter what.

    I think that if you keep positive, keep practicing and keep trying, he will be just fine. :)

    By the way - both of my retained students were promoted just fine. I think it was the best thing for them.

    Kelly :)
     
  38. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 27, 2006

    UPDATE:

    Summer school is over on tomorrow and Ive had a talk with one of the principals and she's saying that they want to speak with me and hear what I think.

    Now I'm at this crossroad again. To retain or not. I've got tonight to think about it before my meeting in the morning.

    She basically states that although his reading is fine, he has considerable trouble with math and finishing assignments. She stated that they can test him for a learning disability (I asked if they could do this before and they said maybe I should go to my doctor which I did and she didn't see anything medically wrong with him).

    I'm 50/50 on this decision now. He has barely passed the standards for getting into the third grade. I asked the teacher would anything be done differently for his case and she stated that he would have a new teacher and her style would be different. That was about it. the curriculum would be the same.

    I think he needs considerable help but then I don't want to keep him back if all it will take on my end is some really good tutoring help in math.

    Please help again with any suggestions on questions that I should be asking before my meeting tomorrow.

    Thanks again everyone for all of your help.
     
  39. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 27, 2006

    Basically he barely passed his overall classes with a 71. He tested pretty low on one of the tests given (please forgive me but I don't know the name of the test here in Texas they take in 2nd grade), and he is having lots of trouble with math and finishing his assignments.

    I'm having a meeting with the school on tomorrow morning to make the decision to retain or not.

    I'm not going to sleep well tonight. LOL
     
  40. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 27, 2006

    I have a hard time tutoring him because of my impatience and not knowing how to connect and get him to pick up the understanding of math. He has such a hard time. I'm not sure how to get him to get it.

    Thanks for your reply
     
  41. kmom

    kmom Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 27, 2006

    Bumping up for responses.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 186 (members: 2, guests: 162, robots: 22)
test