Some questions about becoming an Elementary Teacher?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by No1teacher, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. No1teacher

    No1teacher New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 16, 2010

    1. If you don't major in Elementary Education, can you still become an elementary teacher? Or can you get a teaching license as long as you have a 4 yr degree in anything? If so how long does getting a teaching license take? I want to live in Hawaii and become a teacher.

    2. Also does it matter much whether you have a 4 yr degree from a Podunk U or from a Prestigious U like UMich? What if you had 2.0-2.5 GPA, would that significantly affect your chance of getting hired? What if you graduated from UMich but had 2.0-2.5 GPA could you still be hired?

    3. When you do interview, do you have to actually be physically be present at the school to do the interviews? (If so, do they pay you for travelling and lodging costs?) Can you Skype for interview?

    4. I read that it's hard to get fired from teaching job, but if you are fired, how hard is it to get another job in the teaching field, assuming the reason you were fired wasn't something egregious like child abuse?

    5. Would there be enough turn over rate so that I could be hired in Hawaii? I suppose it is easier get the job in unpopular are, where are such places?
     
  2.  
  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Aug 16, 2010

    You seem to have a lot of wishes regarding what and where you want to teach. (Kindergarten in Hawaii?) While not impossible, you might want to keep your options open, get as much experience as you can working with kids (subbing, volunteering, etc), and get a good education. Good luck to you.
     
  4. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 16, 2010

    1. If you don't major in Elementary Education, can you still become an elementary teacher? Or can you get a teaching license as long as you have a 4 yr degree in anything? If so how long does getting a teaching license take? I want to live in Hawaii and become a teacher. I know there are alternative programs, but they are usually for inner-city schools that have a difficult time finding teachers. For most teaching jobs, there are about 200+ applicants, so I would think that administrators would prefer someone with a major in elementary ed. Maybe I'm wrong here, but things are so competitive in some places. The education program I went through was a 5-year program.

    2. Also does it matter much whether you have a 4 yr degree from a Podunk U or from a Prestigious U like UMich? What if you had 2.0-2.5 GPA, would that significantly affect your chance of getting hired? What if you graduated from UMich but had 2.0-2.5 GPA could you still be hired? I don't think the university itself matters, but the school you're applying to will need a copy of your college transcript, so grades do matter.

    3. When you do interview, do you have to actually be physically be present at the school to do the interviews? (If so, do they pay you for travelling and lodging costs?) Can you Skype for interview? I'm sure this depends on the location and school. If it is a district that is desperate to find teachers they might do a phone interview, but I think most want to do it in person. I HIGHLY doubt a school would pay for traveling and lodging! I would fall off my chair if I heard a district was doing this! (Most school districts have a very limited budget.)

    4. I read that it's hard to get fired from teaching job, but if you are fired, how hard is it to get another job in the teaching field, assuming the reason you were fired wasn't something egregious like child abuse? Not sure about this one.

    5. Would there be enough turn over rate so that I could be hired in Hawaii? I suppose it is easier get the job in unpopular are, where are such places? Sorry, I don't know about the Hawaii market.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Aug 16, 2010

    Hawaii education jobs:

    http://doe.k12.hi.us/personnel/

    The site states that:
    Priority for application processing is given to applicants that have completed a State Approved Teacher Education Program (SATEP) or are currently enrolled in a SATEP.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 16, 2010

    If you want to find a teaching job in Hawaii, I suggest going to school in Hawaii and majoring in Elem. Ed. You could major in something non-education and then move to Hawaii to get your masters in education. Always best to get your degree from a college in the state you want to teach in, then you don't have to deal with additional state tests and course work.
     
  7. Windy City

    Windy City Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 16, 2010

    1. If you don't major in Elementary Education, can you still become an elementary teacher? Or can you get a teaching license as long as you have a 4 yr degree in anything?
    You need the proper classes to get your license. If you already have a BA, you'd be better off working on a Master's in Education (or Teaching) to get your license because you'll need to get a Master's degree eventually anyway. I work in a pretty desirable area, and I don't know a single teacher who has any kind of "alternative" certification. Everybody has traditional degrees in education. Having read these boards, I can say that other areas are different.

    2. Also does it matter much whether you have a 4 yr degree from a Podunk U or from a Prestigious U like UMich? What if you had 2.0-2.5 GPA, would that significantly affect your chance of getting hired? What if you graduated from UMich but had 2.0-2.5 GPA could you still be hired?
    School does not matter, but GPA definitely does. A 2.0-2.5 GPA won't even get you past the application process here. 3.5+ is normal (I've been on countless interview committees).

    And please don't think that "prestigious" universities are superior over "podunk" colleges. I went to a small school for undergrad, and I feel that I received a phenomenal education. A student who receive 2.0 at Michigan would probably still get a 2.0 at another college.

    3. When you do interview, do you have to actually be physically be present at the school to do the interviews? (If so, do they pay you for travelling and lodging costs?) Can you Skype for interview?
    I honestly cannot imagine a district paying for your travel. With budget cuts being so severe, I don't think that would even be a consideration. I would think that a school in Hawaii would be well aware of the high cost to travel there, so they might be willing to Skype OR if they do invite you for an interview, they already know you're the one. I do know that in the past, people from Hawaii (district people or principals? I don't know) have attended education job fairs in various parts of the mainland, and they would hire people there. I don't know if they are still doing that now.


    4. I read that it's hard to get fired from teaching job, but if you are fired, how hard is it to get another job in the teaching field, assuming the reason you were fired wasn't something egregious like child abuse?
    Pretty darn hard.
     
  8. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 16, 2010

    Also, I'm a little curious as to why you're worried about finding a job if you've been fired...???
     
  9. No1teacher

    No1teacher New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 14, 2011

    Can you get stipends while getting Masters in Education, so that the education earns you money instead of costing you money?
     
  10. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jan 14, 2011

    No. it's going to cost you money. Even with teacher loans forgiveness programs you're still going to pay dearly for a Masters. There is NO easy route here. You're going to have to pay to take classes, pay for travel expenses, spend time researching jobs, etc. Not trying to be a downer but it's going to take time, money and dedication.

    I would love to teach in Hawaii, so I think you should go for it if it's what you want to do, but have realistic expectations.
     
  11. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jan 14, 2011

    Also, spend time reading posts here to get a clear picture of what education is like. It's great, exciting, fun, but probably very different than what you and I remember when we were in elementary school. It's always good to arm yourself with as much information as you can.
     
  12. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Messages:
    6,216
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 15, 2011

    I did a graduate assistantship during my masters program that paid for nine credits a semester and gave me a $100/week stipend for working 20 hours a week in an advisement center. I had another part-time job at the time so I really ended up ahead money-wise after my masters or I could have substitute taught because I had two full days off a week from my assistantship. It was a really great experience. Also, I think that you could still loans to cover living expenses if you needed to. Most colleges seem to have assistantships although the amount that they pay differs.

    Also, many colleges have graduate students as assistant hall directors (or things like that) where you live in a residence hall for free and get about six free credits a semester in exchange for helping to run the residence hall. That might be something to look into, also.
     
  13. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 16, 2011

    This is not necessarily true... I had my masters paid in full by the government. In addition to paying two full years of graduate tuition, they gave me a $1,000 stipend each semester to help pay for books. However, this was a special program to help entice teachers into Special education. In return, I had to commit to teaching for 2 years for each year of tuition (so I owe four years) at a public school. I have to make sure each year that I have at least one child with special needs in my classroom.


    This kind of concerns me also. I am unsure of how to respond to this one.
     
  14. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,279
    Likes Received:
    748

    Jan 16, 2011

    I'm concerned about the gpa. That is hard to fix.
     
  15. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 16, 2011

    You can find a way to get a Master's for little money out of pocket using state resources, college/university resources, as well as school district resources if you are currently teaching.

    Most teacher colleges expect a gpa of 3 or higher. I know that in my school, we were accepted into the education school by gpa (and some other factors, but gpa was the biggest). Most students needed to take random easy classes to boast their gpa.

    That being said, I've never had an actual employer ask about my gpa. They do have copies of my transcript, but they never even commented...
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TeacherNY,
  2. MrsC,
  3. Mrs. K.,
  4. miss-m
Total: 315 (members: 5, guests: 286, robots: 24)
test