Social studies help

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by lov2teach4, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. lov2teach4

    lov2teach4 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2010

    I just was informed I have to teach a unit on Maps and the regions of the US without a textbook! I don't know where to start, please help! I saw a few teacher were doing a salt dough map-what is it?:dizzy:
     
  2.  
  3. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Feb 15, 2010

    I found a great map unit online at the beginning of the year (before our textbooks were delivered). It has all grade levels, and you can pick and choose what you need to cover:
    http://www.coreknowledge.org/CK/resrcs/lessons/03_3_WE_VEGOTWHOLE.PDF

    We studied the regions of the US earlier this year. Students each researched one of the regions, and then they made a quilt square (square of white paper) covered with drawings and symbols that told about the region. They taught each other within their groups, and then combined the quilt squares by gluing them to construction paper that we laced together.

    The links below are ones we used for research. There's also an online quiz/game. If you would like a copy of the research form I used, PM me your e-mail address.

    http://www.softschools.com/quizzes/social_studies/united_states_map/quiz772.html

    http://www.dembsky.net/regions/

    http://www.ipl.org/div/kidspace/stateknow/

    A salt dough map is where kids make a relief map on cardboard. If you google 'salt dough,' you'll find recipes. The dough dries, and then students can paint/color it like a map.
     
  4. cutelilram

    cutelilram Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2010

    I taught maps with my third graders. I always started with teaching the students the Cardinal and Intermediate directions. Then, we went into the Prime Meridian, Equator, and the hemispheres. Afterwards, it was an introduction to the continents and which continent we live on and how to use a map key. My map activities were bland, mainly the students drawing and cutting out the continents; then pasting them and labeling the parts of a map. My school gave only one month, 8 periods, to teach map skills, so there wasn't a whole lot of time. But I would start with the basics first, the vocabulary if you haven't already.

    If I ever teach third grade again I would love to try the project you are doing.
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    679

    Feb 15, 2010

    I used to start every year with a brush-up unit on maps. What grade do you teach? They should know the basic types of maps. Salt dough maps (you make your own clay mix that air dries) are most often used for elevation maps.

    I taught 5th grade and usually the end of the unit included finding locations on the globe/map using latitude and longitude.

    Check back issues of Mailbox magazine if you can. There have been some good activities in them in the past.

    There are lots of available reproducible books to use for the vocab and concepts, too. You might want to look around for one. I found a great one in a thrift store, actually.

    This can be a fun unit.
     
  6. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,785
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2010

    Kids love maps so that makes it easier to teach. You could also access some PP on maps and mapping, or some other online sources for maps that the students might like.

    They also like to see and study old maps and compare them to "now" maps. If you take an old US map, before the LA purchase and compare it to USA now, that is fun.

    You can also have them, in teams, draw a map of their school or town. They can also do a home project that demonstrates some area in their community that they would like to represent in a model or chart.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    679
  8. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Feb 15, 2010

    Oh, my students also made a map of their bedroom. We talked about using symbols on the map to represent different objects. They included a map key and compass rose.
     
  9. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    679

    Feb 15, 2010

    A fun activity just to review the compass rose and cardinal directions:

    Give students graph paper (not too small).

    Have them each draw a path that makes a certain number of turns (you decide).

    They pair up and give directions so partners can try and recreate the original maps. Ex: 3 spaces east, 4 spaces north.

    They compare the directed maps to the originals.

    Switch places and repeat.
     
  10. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    679

    Feb 15, 2010

    You can always practice with a Simon Says type game. Place a piece of paper with the letter N on it on the wall designated north. Have students stand. You direct them to take steps to their north, south, east, west. You'll need a clear space for this activity, obviously. Could even be done outside.
     
  11. wrice

    wrice Habitué

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Messages:
    758
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 15, 2010

    with my fifth they can do lat/long, and I have them guess the names of the places for which I've put the coordinates on the board. Then I type those coordinates into Google Earth and it flies us there. Fun for the kids to see the Statue of Liberty, the Grand Canyon, even the Pyramids of Egypt fly by.
     
  12. Deeena

    Deeena Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 16, 2010

  13. cateste

    cateste Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2008
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 19, 2010

    Another way to use maps is to map all the towns and states where your students have relatives. They can even write a letter to their relatives and ask about their towns. Makes a great bb if you plot the points and surround the map with kids' letters.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Ali Imanian,
  2. RainStorm,
  3. miss-m,
  4. Guitart,
  5. Backroads
Total: 445 (members: 7, guests: 424, robots: 14)
test