Social skills comments

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by KarToTeach, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. KarToTeach

    KarToTeach Rookie

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    Nov 20, 2006

    I have parent teacher interviews this week and am wondering if any of youcould share some tips with me. First time around here so I want to be efficient, accurate and positive yet constructive!! How do you address social skills? Any standard comments you can share?
    Thanks.
     
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  3. Deeena

    Deeena Cohort

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    Nov 21, 2006

    I first talked about the students' positive qualities. Then, for each student I gave the parent one goal that I thought would be important to work on. For example, "My goal for Billy is to help him interact in a more positive way with his peers. I am helping him by doing ____, _____, and ______. Here are some ways that you can work with him at home ______." I noticed that using the word, "goal" sounds a lot less threatening to parents when you are addressing social skills.
     
  4. bawilliams

    bawilliams Rookie

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    Nov 21, 2006

    I actually try to have something written when going into a conference. The paper is just for me, not the parents. I have created a standard form that has places blank to fill in positive comments, concerns in academics, social skills, and physical skills, and possible interventions. This way I don't get flustered and forget something important. I will start with the positive comments, and will sometimes even try to work in a cute story about something their child did or said. Then I will introduce my concerns, stopping to get feedback from the parents after each. We will discuss ways we can both help the situation, which I will write on the bottom of the form. I then keep this paper for my own records. After we have discussed all of this, I then try to leave things on a positive note, telling another anecdote or pointing out something their child does very well. This has worked fairly well for me.
     

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