SoCal v SoFl (job wise?)

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by underthesun, May 5, 2014.

  1. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    May 5, 2014

    Hey, all! I'm getting down to that point where I really have to make a decision on where I'm going to move to as soon as possible... As in, within a month, really. Problem is, I /really/ can't decide. Obviously there are about a million different factors that play into this decision that I need to weigh out, but I'm hoping some of you lovely people might be able to help me better understand the job market factor. ^^

    Specifically, I'm deciding between the San Diego area and the Miami area -- and I say /area/ because I am willing to branch outside of the cities themselves, so long as I'm still within an easily commutable distance. For instance, I'd definitely consider Chula Vista and Kendall, and other similarly close areas. I'd possibly be willing to look a ways further, too, so long as I was still in a coastal area; if I'm in a place as hot as SoCal or SoFl, I require easy access to an ocean. xD

    So, I'm curious if any of you have any working knowledge of any of those areas. How's the job market for elementary education? If you know, how do the systems as a whole tend to be? Is there anything that stands out to you about either area being somewhere you would never want to work (or, alternatively, somewhere you'd highly consider)?

    Again, I'm mostly interested in details related to the job market and the quality of the districts themselves. I've pretty much decided that the cultural and weather-related differences pretty much even out (which is super frustrating!). However, if you've got any non-job related comments, please do feel free to share! :)
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    May 5, 2014

    We have members here from South Florida who can chime in about the specifics. From my point of view, just reading the posts here over the last several years, I think you will have more success in Florida.
     
  4. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    That's the gist I've been picking up from the threads I've read, too, but I couldn't be sure. Thanks for the input! :)
     
  5. ahodge79

    ahodge79 Companion

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    May 5, 2014

    I'm in orange county and it is super hard to get in here. Plus SUPER expensive. If I can't get into a "regular" job next year then I am planning to sub and hopefully that will land me a job the year after. However, on the bright side there are actual job posting coming up (5 districts in the last couple weeks!), which hasn't happen since I moved here 5 years ago. Things are turning around :)

    I suggest you check out the job posting sites- CA is easy for that, they are mostly all listed at edjoin.org
     
  6. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    I'm pretty sure Orange County is the worst market in the state. I went to school there but had to move for a job. But you're right, there are FINALLY jobs posted after YEARS of nothing.

    To the OP, I know nothing about SD's job market - it's the area of SoCal I am the least familiar with - but I would be willing to bet that FL's is easier. Have you compared cost of living? SoCal is VERY VERY VERY expensive. That's one of the main reasons my husband and I are moving to northern CA this summer. Sure SoCal is great and there is lots to do, but we have to make huge sacrifices to be able to afford housing here, and it's just not worth it to us anymore. I would second the edjoin suggestion, and also suggest that you look on trulia or realtor at house prices even if you don't want a house right now to get an idea of what it's like here. And look at rent.com or forrent.com for apartment costs. Teacher salaries look high here, but there is a reason for that. COL is just extremely high, and even the supposedly higher teacher salaries don't really cut it here.

    Wow, what a negative response...I'm sorry! :( I just think that personally, all things equal, I would go to the place with the better job market and lower cost of living.
     
  7. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    May 6, 2014

    Oh, yes, I've heard Orange County is one of the hardest job markets to break into. I just wasn't sure if further south was easier or not. But it's good to hear that things are starting to turn around (and I do wish you the best of luck getting into a "regular" job!).

    I've definitely been glancing over what I've seen on EdJoin, but thank you for the recommendation! Unfortunately, Florida doesn't seem to have anything comparable that I've found yet, and I'm not quite sure what a "good" market looks like, so I just wasn't sure how exactly to interpret what I've found online.
     
  8. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    Do you think so? Yeah, I know that there are supposed to be a lot of openings in the more central areas of Florida, and that's definitely a factor, because if I couldn't find a job in the Miami area, I'd at least have the ability to move somewhere not too terribly far away. But I'm just not so sure how the Miami area itself is. :confused:

    Cost of living is a good point, too! I've done a few of the COL calculators that compare the cities, and all of them have San Diego being more expensive than Miami, mainly because of housing, but I'm not sure how much I believe that. I've looked at Realtor and everything, and the problem is, decent houses in Miami are ridiculously expensive, too. BUT, the salaries are relatively equal and Florida has no state income tax, so that does definitely give more disposable income, especially if I'm looking at apartments and not houses at first.

    No, no! No need to apologize! I wanted a straight forward answer, so I definitely appreciate it! And it's important to hear that you think there are plenty of things to do, but it's not worth it in the increased COL/housing; that's one of the struggles I've been having, as San Diego has may more outdoorsy activities than Miami.
     
  9. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    If you want to come to South Florida for the weather, fine. If you come for the school districts, I'd say you are nuts.
     
  10. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    Mostly it's a consideration for familial and financial reasons, because I actually am NOT a huge fan of hot weather. I'm already crazy! :lol:

    But would you mind elaborating a little bit more on the school district comment? Do you mean more as a teacher or as a parent... or both? I don't have any kids just yet, but that's definitely in the picture for not too far down the road, so I'm trying to weigh the job possibilities with good schools for kids down the road.
     
  11. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    May 6, 2014

    That's because Florida is an absolute ****hole for teachers. The state is extremely anti-teacher. There is no "tenure" anymore for new hires, only annual contracts.

    Do you really want to waste money going to a state where you can lose a job at any time and possibly be blackballed through license revocation if you have two "bad" annual evals in a row? Remember, principals can literally make stuff up about you if they want you gone. Until these crazy reformers started ruining education laws, revocation applied only to people involved in felonies or misconduct involving children.
     
  12. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    There are few or no jobs in California, especially for elementary education.

    In fact, there are few or no jobs in elementary education anywhere in the country.

    Only those areas and states where teachers are treated like dirt are there any jobs to be had.
     
  13. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    Is the main reason you think of Florida as an "absolute ****hole for teachers" because of the change in tenure policy? I mean, from what I know on the topic, I'm for tenure instead of against it, but I understand the arguments from both sides, and I would certainly hope to make myself a valuable enough teacher to have administrators WANT to re-hire me every year.

    I am surprised to hear about the license revocation policy, however; I hadn't heard that before. I'm curious as to how "bad" an eval must be in order for a license to be revoked.

    While I appreciate your honesty, I'm not exactly sure what to take from your commentary. I know elementary education is not a high-demand field, of course, but I am pursuing the career because I feel it is something that I can do well, and because it is something that I have a passion for. Yes, I'm trying to consider the job market while deciding where to move to, but a poor market isn't going to make me give up my dream.

    I've seriously considered secondary social studies, as well, but I think my passion rests more with the elementary kiddos and curriculum. Besides, it's not like the market for secondary social studies is any better, from what I've heard. I just don't have the desire to teach only science or math, and that's where all of the demand is at. I'm just not too interested in the curriculum for many of the high school level science and math courses. /shrug.
     
  14. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    That's not totally true. There are not no jobs...few, maybe, but the number has increased this year. I got a job in 2012 and again in 2014 (northern CA, though). You may not get your dream job in the district everyone wants to work in...but that's because everyone wants to work there. In my case, I went charter. It turned out amazingly - I love my current school and my future school, both charters. But this year I have seen movement in public districts too. My credential program cohort advisor emailed all of us because local districts (local to OC) are hiring next year. This has really not happened in the past 6 years or more. Things are turning around. Yes, the job market is very tight here, and still tough, but it is not impossible.

    From what I've read on here, FL seems to be a mixed bag. They have a lot of issues CA doesn't have because we seem to have a stronger union here. However, they have class size caps in elementary (correct me if I'm wrong, but it's 18 primary, 22 upper elem? Something like that?) while you will never see a class that small in most public districts in southern CA - 30+ is more the norm for every elementary grade. CA doesn't really have a lot of specialists (library, art, music, PE, etc), though it does depend on the district. Both SoCal districts I student taught in had literally no prep time at the elementary level, plus additional duties every day. My charter has no duties and some prep time, plus specialists. So there is variation. I can't really say what FL has; I don't know.

    It's interesting to hear that the Miami area is so expensive (though not really that surprising). I know central FL is not expensive at all, at least compared to here.

    Granted, I have only been to Orlando (Disney World...haha!) but FL is HOT HOT HOT. If you don't like heat...I dunno. That humidity, wow. Just wow. We have nothing even close to that extreme in CA. Especially San Diego, which has basically perfect weather year round.
     
  15. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    I've heard the same thing about class size caps in Florida, which I obviously think is a major, major pro. I heard that the change to capped classes is one of the main reasons why there actually ARE openings in Florida now.

    I think the Miami COL really depends on what specific area you're looking at. My family lives in downtown near Biscayne and the financial district, so that's what I've been most familiar with, and that's certainly a more expensive area. And the places that they've been looking for houses are more upper end, too, so I'm probably looking at the high end of the scale when it comes to housing costs in Miami.

    No, you're definitely right. It's EXTREMELY hot, especially with that humidity, and ESPECIALLY as soon as you step away from the water. That's one of the things I'm concerned about, actually; moving to Miami would mean I likely WOULDN'T be right on the water, which could very well result in me being reduced to a puddle of misery. :unsure:
     
  16. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    Anyone from the South Florida area have any input?
     

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