So Tell Me....

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by SCTeachInTX, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 8, 2012

    On another thread this topic was brought up and I thought... What a great question. I think I will post it.

    What does your job market look like for teachers in your state? I currently live in Texas. The market here is definitely better than last year. Teaching positions have been available in just about all the major districts. Even the smaller districts have felt some growth. The market is not as strong as 5 years ago... but the job market is WAY up from last year. :)
     
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  3. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Aug 8, 2012

    Compared to FL, CT, NY, OH, MI, and other states that are notorious for having no openings, NC has done alright. When I moved here 5 years ago there were easily 40 openings on a daily basis in my last district. Nowadays I'd say it's about 1/3 of that, but I still think that's pretty good. Last year was pretty bad. Even tough I wasn't looking, I did notice there were only 1 0r 2 postings a day. I've seen a definite surge this school year.
     
  4. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Aug 8, 2012

    The job market in my FL county is always good. 250 new hires this year with 121 positions still open.

    Of course, it's always a good job market because the turnover is so high... working conditions and pay are pretty crappy here.
     
  5. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Can I be nosey and ask how low the pay is? Here in NC, teachers begin at 29,000...can't be much worse than that! :|
     
  6. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Aug 8, 2012

    Starting is $35,000... but:
    - beach town = rent is pretty high
    - tourist town = everything else is expensive, too
    - Salaries frozen for last 6 years
    - 3% for retirement now coming out
    - Health insurance went up

    I actually take home less now than I did my first year teaching.
     
  7. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Aug 8, 2012

    Same old story. There is very little available in suburban districts., a few more vacancies in the urban districts. Special Ed is in high demand, and more and more districts are looking for ELA or Math with a Special Ed cert.
     
  8. LouiseB

    LouiseB Cohort

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    Aug 8, 2012

    I live in a rural state and I would say most people get a teaching job. However, the majority hiring time is from February to about the end of May. June still has some vacancies but not as many as before. There are a few openings here and there after June. Bascially if you want a job in this state, you need to be employed by the end of May. I think this year was more hiring than in the past few years.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Aug 8, 2012

    To expand on Pisces:

    I would consider NC to be 'stable'. It is similar to what the rest of the country was like 10-15 years ago (except the areas that are always really tough markets). They are not desperate and hiring anyone, but it is not impossible to find a job, either.

    5-7 years ago, they were desperate. 2-3 years ago, it was pretty tight (never even close to being as tight as NY, NJ, MI, CA).
     
  10. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I'm in Ohio and searched for jobs last year and this year. There were definitely more postings for my subject area (English) this year than last year. I had a SS friend remark on the same thing and another said they noticed more music openings. I was hired much earlier this year so I didn't apply to as many jobs :) I poked around KY a bit before deciding I wanted to stay in OH and they seemed to have about the same as last year.
     
  11. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    Things seem to be worse here in my state. More and more schools are not replacing positions when people leave them. They are collapsing classrooms and upping numbers. There are still a few counties that are "high need" counties that have high turnover rates that are hiring, but even that has slowed down. I know the county we are in had 127 people retire this year and 125 of those jobs were cut completely out of the budget and no replacements hired. Lots of teachers are being transferred around to other schools that have openings in lieu of hiring someone. It's actually a little scary at how slow things were this year all the way around! :(
     
  12. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 8, 2012

    Ok... so we heard from:
    Texas, Florida, NC, Georgia, Ohio, PA... I know we have reps from all the states! How is YOUR job market?
     
  13. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Well, I was looking in Michigan. There were more positions this year than I have ever seen before. Mostly because they changed the laws on kindergarten. However, it is still thousands of applications per position.

    I graduated in 06 and had 1 interview in MI in two hiring seasons. Now, with 5 years of experience, I had 4 interviews. I was the 2nd choice twice. :tired: I had to stop looking because the school year in NC starts almost a month before the MI school year. I still own a house in NC, so I had to have a stable income for the mortgage. I will be trying again next year (and I shouldn't have a house tying me down by then).
     
  14. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I would say Colorado is still looking pretty good to me as far as market, but it's gotten tougher in the past couple of years. The thing is, even their "tougher" market is nothing like some of the other states that are truly really difficult. The CO natives that I worked with were freaking out about it last year while us transplants were all saying we moved here for the job market. We worked with a long term sub that didn't even really look for another job because she didn't think there was anything out there. Crazy! My last district RIF'd teachers, but ended up hiring after people left anyway. My new district hired tons of new teachers for this year.

    If you're willing to look rural, you should be able to find something hands down. Denver is by far the toughest market in the state with Co Springs being behind them. Even inside the Denver metro though, we're still talking maybe 200 candidates for an elementary position, which I know sounds like a lot but is crazy good compared to other states. In my last district we'd get maybe 15-20 applicants for an elementary position, and some that are even more rural would literally have trouble getting people. I don't know that there's much of a difference between suburban and urban as far as how competitive it is. When I went to a Denver metro job fair I heard just about every candidate talking about how they wanted to work somewhere with "more diversity" or somewhere they could "make a difference." DPS and other urban districts had lines wrapped around the building several times while the suburban districts didn't seem to get as much interest.

    Salaries are very low compared to the rest of the country especially in relation to the cost of living. Now that I'm in Denver I'm WAY better off than living in the mountains, but I'm still not making as much as I would in my home state, which still has a cheaper COL. The state has also gotten rid of tenure completely and gone to pay for performance based 50% on test scores. Pretty much anywhere you go you're going to have a high population of hispanic/ELL students. I really enjoy working with this population, but given that many kids come in not speaking English of course many districts struggle with test scores, which is a bigger deal now with the pay for performance. I know some schools in DPS have been taken over by the government for this year and we're all honestly curious to see if they can do any better. We know they've already instituted a much longer school day and longer school year, which no extra pay (and the school day/year were already normal 8 hour workdays, so it's not like they were correcting an overly short day). Within the state some districts are union and some are not. My last district was not, my new one is. I can already tell a huge difference.
     
  15. Jlyn07

    Jlyn07 Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2012

    I'm in central NY and the market has always been tough but I think it's getting better. My small district is hiring 4 teachers (1 elementary, 3 middle/high school) this year and hired 3 last year. There were major budget issues with a large district near me this year where they laid off hundreds of teachers but most were recalled a couple of months later.

    I still know several people who either moved down south or are still looking for positions though so maybe things aren't really getting better, I don't know.
     
  16. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Oh and just to add. The school I left hired NINE new teachers this year, out of a staff of about 25. School starts a week from tomorrow and they still had two teachers resign this week. He got a job somewhere else. So there are definitely jobs out there if you're going with the theory any experience is good experience. I don't agree with it but I know some are desperate for a job!
     
  17. WanderinTeacher

    WanderinTeacher Rookie

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    CA looks pretty bad to me. It went from rejections mostly saying they found people with more experience to hearing nothing at all. This year, a few, but not many responses of rejection.
     
  18. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2012

    I definitely concur with things looking up in Texas. I went from having maybe three interviews the last two hiring seasons to 11 in a two week period. :woot:
     
  19. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Aug 10, 2012

    It seemed pretty easy for me to find a job here in Hawaii. But you HAVE to have your Hawaii teaching certificate and be living here, otherwise they usually won't respond to you. Some years they do recruitment trips, so they might be easier on those requirements if you meet with a recruiter.

    They also hire last minute. You have to do a state level interview, but then you don't get any calls for interviews at specific schools until June or July, and school starts at the end of July here.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 10, 2012

    Long Island and NYC have been brutal forever. I remember as a kid in the '70's, my cousin wanted to be a Phys Ed teacher, hearing my uncle tell her over and over and over again that there were no jobs!!!! (She eventually found one and did it for a few years, then ended up in pharecutical sales for the remainder of her career.)

    It may be slightly better than last year, I don't know. But such a difference would only mean a few hundred less resumes in the pile, not a difference that any applicant would really notice.

    In my school we only have one new teacher this year-- in a faculty of over 120, that's incredibly unusual.
     
  21. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 10, 2012

    NJ is tough...always has been. That said, not a year goes by that my district doesn't hire a few teachers...I think 3 or 4 in my school alone this summer. I believe only one was gen Ed...the others have some pecial Ed certs...
     
  22. MMIS_Buckeye

    MMIS_Buckeye Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2012

    That's awesome to hear about Texas! I have family in Austin and have continued to go back and forth with a family adventure by moving across country. Does this seem to be across the state? I've heard Austin/Round Rock isn't a great market being saturated with new grads in years past. I've looked south of Houston around League City/Galveston and north of Houston too. I thinking my being an Intervention Specialist with a Reading Endorsement may help but have looked at adding the ESL as well.
     
  23. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Sep 6, 2012

    I'm really glad that was your experience, and congrats on your new position! Not sure where you are, but I know Central Ohio usually has more openings than any other part of the state. The greater Cleveland areas and most of NE Ohio have been just saturated with applicants, the major urban districts were hit pretty hard with cuts, and this year charter schools have been hiring TFA recruits. Cleveland laid off some 700 teachers (200 early retirements, 500 RIFs), and surrounding suburban districts had less drastic cuts and a few openings, but to me they seemed a lot fewer compared to past years.

    My school hired a teacher who from one of the major urban districts, and the position wasn't full time. I'm in an elementary school, but our high school did have more openings. I've kept up with postings, and I've NEVER seen so many part time, non-benefited positions since I entered the profession in 2005, in both private and public sectors. It may just depend on your subject matter and obviously location, but I and most others I've spoken with in NE found the teaching job market this year to be VERY competitive.

    It would be interesting to know just how many teachers out there who were looking for full time found positions, and in which areas of the state.
     
  24. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I found out through a friend that one of the major school districts in the DFW area hired 400 teachers this year. I actually interviewed for two of them, but none of the 400 jobs were posted on the district website. The only postings they put out were on the wall in the district office. The only reason I even got an interview was because I had my resume on file with the district.
     
  25. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Sep 7, 2012

    Mc, I got my job in the Columbus area, which actually was the area that had the least amount of openings after the Toledo area. Cinci had a bunch! I applied for at least 30 openings there. Cleveland/Akron I applied to about 20. Columbus I only applied to 5. I stopped applying in may when I was hired. Not sure what it was like after that.

    I had 2 friends get hired in NW OH and five got hired in NE OH.
     

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