So how common is this?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Sarge, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jan 21, 2010

    No teacher work days.
    No prep.
    No specials.
    No aid.
    School locked up on weekends.
    Long list of mandatory individual, one-on-one, interview type assessments with no release time or sub coverage - "Have them doing seat work"

    I'm asking because it seems a lot of other people (mostly in states other than California) get these things.
     
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  3. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Jan 21, 2010

    My school district does not pay teachers to come in for work days. We have PD days, but those are planned for us; we don't get to work on grades or planning or in our rooms. As a junior high teacher, I have no aide. Every K-5 teacher in our district has an aide, but at the JH, only the special ed classes have aides. As to the rest of your list, I don't have to deal with those types of things.
     
  4. zoey'smom

    zoey'smom Cohort

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    Jan 21, 2010

    We have teachers institute and School improvement days that are planned, but those days also have planned things for us to do.

    My prep time is during our specials, I get about 55 minutes a day plus lunch.

    Specials- We have Library one day a week, computers, 2 days a week, music 2 days a week and PE everyday.

    Aids- We have two school aids that help in the classrooms and with RTI. I get one for about an hour a day during my reading time. They also pull out kids for RTI.

    We can get in our rooms anytime including on weekends.

    Our school discourages seat work and we do have aides help with assessments.

    I teach in a very small town and school district in a rural area in Illinois.
     
  5. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Jan 21, 2010

    This is the way it was when I taught in Lutheran schools. Plus, we ate lunch with our kids too.

    However, the schools were either unlocked or I had a key so that I could get in any time.
     
  6. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Jan 21, 2010

    I never experienced these issues until I moved to CA. In MI, I had total access to the school anytime with a swipe key, I had spec ed aides for my spec ed kids, I had a prep every day during the kids' special, freedom with the curriculum, etc. When I got out here, I lost everything in both of the public and private schools I've worked in.
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 21, 2010

    No teacher work days--one during the year for us this year.
    No prep--we do get 210 minutes/week as per our current contract
    No specials--all of our students get music, phys. ed, drama and visual arts, but not always taught by a "specialty" teacher
    No aid--our aides are allocated to schools based on the percentage of the school population with special needs requiring academic or behavioural support. They tend to work with many classrooms and students, not to be assigned to one room unless there are students who require constant one-on-one supervision.
    School locked up on weekends--they all are here; we don't have keys.
    Long list of mandatory individual, one-on-one, interview type assessments with no release time or sub coverage - "Have them doing seat work"--we don't get release time to perform our assessments either. A couple of years ago, our primary teachers were given release time and the rest of us weren't too happy about it. Unfortunately, now none of us get it.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 21, 2010

    I have a daily prep period that's 85 minutes long, which is one class period on our block schedule. It's more time than we're technically allotted in our contracts.

    We don't have "specials", but that's the norm for high school. Our students have access to a variety of electives in a variety of subject areas.

    I don't have an aide, which is again the norm for high school. Core classes with lots of special ed students have a "CC" teacher, who is a special ed teacher assigned to work specifically with the special ed students in the core class. Other contained special ed classes have full-time aides.

    Our school is locked nightly from 10 PM to 5 AM and on the weekends. All teachers have an individualized security code to override the alarm if they want to come in after hours or on weekends. Teachers do need to check out a building key ahead of time, though.

    We are required to perform a variety of assessments, both formal and informal. Some of them are the "interview" style, particularly in foreign language where students have to communicate in the target language. During those sorts of activities, I have the rest of the students working on individual practice assignments at their desk. It's not busy work, but it is seat work, I suppose.

    Our school is Title I, so we have access to lots of extra funds for professional development and subject-area collaboration. If our department wants to take a day or off and collaborate (working on common assessments or whatever), the principal will authorize us to put in for subs to cover our classes (and obviously the school will pay for that--we don't pay for our own subs). Our department hasn't done this yet, but many of the core subject areas have.

    Some of these issues are contractual and others pertain to the school climate.
     
  9. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Jan 21, 2010

    :whistle:
     
  10. Ambrosegirl84

    Ambrosegirl84 Companion

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    Jan 21, 2010

    Claps to you guys...I worry about what will happen when/if I teach at a "real" school!! I don't get much prep time...just two 15-minute breaks while the kids are at recess. But I only have four students...and I have an AIDE! (They are in all different grades, so don't know how I'd teach 3 different grades including K without her).

    No discipline problems, 100 percent supportive parents, only 1 standardized test a year, and I live right next to the school in a nice small house that is FREE...so I can come and go when I want.

    And to think the district had a hard time finding someone for the job....I'll keep it, thank you very much! :)

    Not that I haven't had other stresses...like the same "how to reach this student" and "am I teaching well enough?" and the occasional odd mountain lion....
     
  11. ecsmom

    ecsmom Habitué

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    Jan 21, 2010

    I guess we are pretty lucky. We have at least 45 mins of specials which is when we are supposed to pan or attend meetings. We get 30 of duty free lunch. we have to supervise our own recess and we don't have keys to the building so we can't get in over weekends or breaks during the school year. The building is open during the summer from 8-3 except for July 4th week and the week they wax the floors.
     
  12. Ambrosegirl84

    Ambrosegirl84 Companion

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    Jan 21, 2010

    Sorry, I didn't want that last post to sound like I was gloating...maybe it did, a little. I should have emphasized that I'm just in awe of what most of you teachers have to deal with every day...that you are still sane and willing/ready to help students succeed, even when the "system" seems to be working against you.
     
  13. Emma35

    Emma35 Connoisseur

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    Jan 21, 2010

    No teacher work days.No teacher work days at all.
    No prep.Our prep is during our specials.
    No specials. - We get a 50 minute prep during our specials 4 days a week, one day a week we work all day with no break except lunch.
    No aid.No aid at all.
    School locked up on weekends.Locked up tight on weekends
    Long list of mandatory individual, one-on-one, interview type assessments with no release time or sub coverage - "Have them doing seat work"Many one-on-one assessments with no release time or sub coverage.
     
  14. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Jan 21, 2010

    Okay, so this is in a small Lutheran school...

    No teacher work days.Our contract is in effect from Aug. 1 to June 1, but doesn't specify a number of days. We have several days of meetings/prep before school starts that we are expected to attend. Prior to this year, we had an early release once a month; the afternoons were used sometimes for planned prof. development, sometimes for work time. However, the state eliminated early release days. That means any PD we do is done before or after school. We did have two days off in October to attend our state teacher's conference.
    No prep.Our prep is during the kids' lunch recess (about 15-20 minutes), but we have to cover that if an aide is absent. Every other day we get a 15 min. prep during afternoon recess.
    No specials. - Each teacher (1-4) teaches one special (music, art, computers, P.E.). Each grade goes to a different class for 30 minutes a day. On Mondays, I teach K music; the K teacher takes my kids to the library.
    No aid.K-2 share an aide in the mornings. We also have two aides that work with certain students (pull-out help), but those come from stimulus money.
    School locked up on weekends.Every teacher has their own key--I've done some odd hours, especially during the summer.
    Long list of mandatory individual, one-on-one, interview type assessments with no release time or sub coverage - "Have them doing seat work"In 3rd, I don't have many of these. I believe the lower grades do, though. They do not get subs.[/QUOTE]
     
  15. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Jan 21, 2010

    I have an 80 min prep each day.
    I'm in high school, but the students take about 6 electives during their 4 years which is similar to "specials"
    Our sped classes have aids
    I honestly have no idea if our school is locked on the weekends. I live 40 minutes away. I do my weekend work at home.
    I don't know how the one-on-one assessments at the elementary level happen.
    We have 3-4 work days per year and they're all paid.

    So no, these are not true where I work. And I don't even want to think of the stress for teachers that have to work where this is the case!
     
  16. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 21, 2010

    Our preps are during this kids' specials. Each special is 50 mins. Most days they have specials twice a day, except one day my kids have 3 specials in one (which includes library).

    WE do not have aides, but we are a small private school, and classroom sizes are low.

    We HAVE ACCESS to the school and our rooms over the weekend.

    We do not have relief to do one-on-one assessments, but one-on-one assessments are up to us.

    We do not have special ed or resource, so if a student has special needs that we cannot accommodate, we refer them to another school. We simply do not have the resources to accommodate all types of students (like those who need pull out for one-on-one).
     

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