Small Group Reading Help

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by soleil00, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2011

    I recently received my kids test scores (AIMsWeb if you are familiar with it) and I have..... 11 "average", 3 "above average", and 7 are well below average.

    I need to start working with the average, but my main focus needs to be the well below average.

    Is it a bad idea to only work with those who are well below? Should I work with them all regardless of how much time it eats up?


    What I really need help with is HOW to do the small group reading intervention. I don't know what to do precisely. My WBA group has little to no reading skills what so ever... maybe 3 of the 7 have decent reading skills but the others have none. I don't know where to start.

    Should I jump right into small decodables or should I work with letters first, move to making words, and then on to books?
     
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  3. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2011

    I think they should be reading books, but also include word work.
     
  4. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2011

    Just clarifying, most of my "below average" kids can't read the simple words. I'm trying to think of our words for our story this week to give an example...
    I know some of last weeks that they couldn't read were:
    and not net then they that much


    Even sounding them out they couldn't tell me what the words were. So.. should I still start with books?
     
  5. MissAnt

    MissAnt Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2011

    I would used leveled books but it sounds like they need a lot of remediation in phonics. Work with letters and sounds, work on blending, segmenting, and isolating sounds. The ability to manipulate words is a good indicator of future reading success. For example changing the beginning sound in cat to make bat, mat, hat, etc.
     
  6. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2011

    I still think you're lowest level kids should be reading. You will just spend more time doing word work. But there are leveled books they can probably read. If you give a strong introduction, read a couple pages together, and explain the structure of the book ("On every page the little boy tells something he had for dinner. On this page, he says, "I ate a banana. And on this page he says, "I ate a carrot. Let's look at the next page to see what he ate....) Something like that...
    First you need to find out what your kids CAN do. This is when the F&P continuum really helps because then you can see what your next goal will be during reading groups.
     
  7. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2011

    That's what I was thinking because a site that our ELA/Reading team plans with (Florida Center for Reading Research I think) basically says that without a decent grasp on blending, segmenting, and other basic phonics stuff then they will have ten times harder the work learning to read.

    @Lynnnn725 - Thank you for your input as well! We do a lot of that in whole group instruction, but maybe a little bit of reinforcement in small groups will help a lot.


    I need to get this going on because I have to start on Monday. All my colleagues started this week but I didn't have scores until now!
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Sep 22, 2011

    A few different responses:

    - Yes, I would work with all of the kids during a long reading block time in which you rotate different reading groups, with other kids participating in literacy centers.

    - In terms of leveled readers vs. phonics vs. other activities, a good thorough reading assessment would be very helpful in determining specific skill deficits each child has, and what they would need help with. The basic idea is that you wouldn't have them do things they can't do. So, if you are going to leveled readers with kids who can't decode basic CVC words and have little or no site words built up, stick with an A or B book that is highly repetitive (e.g., "The dog is hot, The dog is wet, The dog is fast" etc.) so that they build reading "behaviors."

    Personally, if I had only a short amount of time with a child who was substantially behind and had no decoding skills, I would focus exclusively on phonemic awareness (you know FCRR is big on that!), phonics (identifying single letter sounds and blending CVC words), and building basic site words from a dolch list. You'll get a lot more bang from you buck focusing on those areas.

    Over time, though, kids skills will shift - some of your low-level kids will become middle level kids, some middle kids will go down in skill, etc. So, constantly watching that AIMSweb data, doing your own classroom assessment, etc. will be important for keeping your group composition appropriate over time.
     
  9. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2011

    *bows to EdEd*

    Amazing information. I think I may to (yet again) shift my reading block time because right now I only have about 20-30 minutes for reading. I think I can switch it and social studies which will give me a greater amount of time...

    Thanks for all the help. My school prefers that we don't mix the groups together, so the highs don't get bored or annoyed when the lows can't read a 4 word sentence. Therefore my groups will be as they are... lows, mediums, and highs.
     
  10. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Sep 22, 2011

    No problem, and sounds like you're progressing with plans! Good luck - looking forward to hearing how things work out....
     
  11. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Sep 25, 2011

    I recommend Month by Month Phonics for First Grade. This helped me a lot when I was beginning teaching first grade.

    I also strongly echo EdEd's advice: get the dolch word lists, and start your lowest group with 5 easy words each week. We do the activities in the above book for our sight words. You choose words for sight words that are going to be in the books they read that week. I begin with them memorizing I, see, like, said, the, and. They get a sticker if they can say their words to me from flashcards on Fridays, and a full chart gets them in the prize box.

    Leveled books are vital to the child's success!! You must not give a book to a child that he cannot read successfully. The first step in reading is for the child to believe he is a reader. You can find repetitive books that use the basic dolch sight words and they will be thrilled. PM me if you want more specific ideas.

    Good luck! Your passion says you are on the right track!
     
  12. jeweledpoet

    jeweledpoet Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2011

    My low at risk kids on aimsweb need intense interventions. What test are you looking at? My at risk kids that I would be the most concerned with is the nwf. The ones in the red probably also are in the red or yellow in letter sound, right? So, before you can expect them to blend anything, the gap of the letter sound relationship needs to be filled. We have 7 kids kids who are not accurate with letter sounds, so they are receiving 1 hour of intervention daily for it. How can we push the readers or sight words when they don't have the foundation of the alphabet? Someone very wise once told me : You can't build a house on sand.... I hope you find a great intervention that works! I am currently using "Making Sense of Phonics" for my small groups and I really like the strategy.
     

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