Skipping a grade??

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Shake, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. Shake

    Shake New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 21, 2011

    I have an 8 year old daughter. She is currently a second grader in a private school. I am looking at moving her to a public school. The problem is that she has already done most of the third grade curriculim. She is already doing multiplication and division. Her spelling words are on par with a friends fourth grader. She was tested at a 9th grade reading level. There are not a lot of private school options and the one she is going to currently is not an option for next year. I had her take the 3rd grade TAKS test online from 2009 and she did amazing. Has anyone had any success in skipping a grade? Does anyone have any other advice? She is quite small for her age so that worries me.
     
  2.  
  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 21, 2011

    If I were you, I would sit down with the principal of the local public school. Talk about your options.
     
  4. porque_pig

    porque_pig Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 21, 2011

    I skipped the fourth grade.

    When I skipped it, I was attending a private school. My teacher and principal suggested it to my parents, and after careful consideration, they allowed me to do it. I struggled a little at the beginning of the 5th grade year, but within a few months, my grades were on par with everyone else's. My parents moved me to a public school halfway through that year, and I did especially well after heading to the public school.

    It definitely depends on the student. My parents were concerned about my emotional maturity more than my academic abilities. Things were a little tough in that realm for a while (I was a 9-year-old 5th grader, so I was smaller than everyone and I wasn't as mature as the other students in 5th/6th combined class that contained students as old as 13). Be sure to take emotional maturity into consideration.

    Also, I wouldn't consider it if the administration in the public school didn't thing it was a good idea. In my case, the administration suggested it to my parents, and they decided to go along with the idea. If there is a lot of disagreement, however, it could make things difficult for everyone involved.

    I'd say get some professionals to evaluate your daughter to determine how well she would do in a higher level. She may flourish! But be sure to heed the advice of the principal.
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    233

    Mar 21, 2011

    I would also do a class visit if you could - just to see how you think she'd fit in. You mentioned she was small, but how is she socially? How different is the public school from the private school?
     
  6. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,621
    Likes Received:
    6

    Mar 21, 2011

    I was skipped ahead when I was young. Hands down, it is the worst decision my parents ever made (and they've made some doozys). I was immature and unable to fit in with my peers. School was miserable for me for nearly my entire life. I had no social skills; a problem that stayed with me well into adulthood.

    Teachers can differentiate instruction. Parents can supplement at home. What neither one of them can do is accelerate the social development of young children.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,115

    Mar 21, 2011

    I had a student who started grade one and was quickly moved to my second grade class. Academically, he did fine but he put A LOT of pressure on himself. He was afraid to make mistakes and acted out a bit...he eventually adjusted and all worked out fine.
     
  8. Shake

    Shake New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 21, 2011

    Skipping a grade

    I understand the social aspect of skipping a grade. I don't know if it helps but her birthday is midway through the year. So she is a little older than most of the kids in the class. She already hangs out with a lot of the kids in that grade and is friends with them.

    The big issue is if she gets bored she acts out. It was a big problem in kindergarten. It has also been a bit of a problem in first and second grade. She has tested at very high levels. I really wish we had a magnet school here for her.
     
  9. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,621
    Likes Received:
    6

    Mar 21, 2011

    Obviously, my feelings are very strong, but, ask yourself this.

    Which would you rather deal with? The added trouble of keeping her learning in her current grade level, or the chance that she'll have social problems well into adulthood? A year makes a HUGE difference in elementary school. Any decent teacher will make sure she stays challenged in the classroom if she's kept with grade level peers. At least, that's what I would do if I was her teacher.
     
  10. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,091
    Likes Received:
    1

    Mar 21, 2011

    I skipped 4th grade and it was an awful mistake. I wasn't ready for 5th grade! I started kindergarten when I was 4 (birthday in Oct) so I was very immature. I was small, shy, and miserable. School was a nightmare for me, until I met another kid in my Junior year of High School that was in the same situation. We clung to one another. 40 some years later we are still "bestest" friends. Choose wisely....I still bear the scars:(
     
  11. Shake

    Shake New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 21, 2011

    Other option

    There is another private school option for us. However, they are not accredited by the state. Does this matter in elementary school? I do realize that I can provide challeges for her at home. However, if she goes to third grade in public school as it is now she will be doing everything she has done this year. Our public school doesn't have grade level GT programs. It is one group and they meet a few hours a week. She loves to read so I am not all that worried about her losing skills there. But I do worry about math and other subjects that she doesn't favor. This year she has read four Harry Potter books, Chronicles of Narnia, Robinson Crusoe, Robin Hood, all of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books, Dicey's Song, and a ton of other books. She can read them, give a summary of them, and answer questions about them. If anyone has ideas on other books I can have her read that would be awesome as well. She loves the American Girl books but they really don't challenge her.
     
  12. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    233

    Mar 21, 2011

    Sounds like she gets along well and is already friends with kid in that grade, and that you aren't that concerned with her social development in terms of advancing a grade. It isn't like she would be skipping a grade at her own school, just entering a different grade at a different school. I think every child is different, and while caution makes a great deal of sense, if you feel like she's academically more suited for the higher grade, and already is well adjusted with the actual kids who will be there, it makes sense to continue considering that option.
     
  13. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 22, 2011

    Most public schools have some kind of advanced math or reading classes eventually. In our district, they start around 3rd grade.

    I would sit down with the principal and discuss some options. Maybe she can still be in her grade for most subjects and have a grade higher math....

    Books: Sister's Grimm series, Allie Finkle series, Princess Diaries series, Babysitter's Club series, Percy Jackson series....
     
  14. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Mar 22, 2011

    I'm not exactly sure how it works in Texas, but this wouldn't work here in Nebraska. We have so much testing that goes on at the fourth grade level, and a student couldn't skip that. Maybe with the TAKS that doesn't matter. We also study state history in fourth grade, and I would hate for my child to miss that.
     
  15. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Mar 22, 2011

    kc~In Texas, a 3rd grade student takes Reading and Math TAKS. In 4th, they take the Writing test. In 5th, they take the Reading, Math, and Science TAKS. And these tests have concepts that are in each grade level. We also teach state history in 4th grade.
     
  16. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,874
    Likes Received:
    158

    Mar 22, 2011

    I probably could have skipped 8th gr since I had been going to private schools from K-7 & my parents & I moved in which I started public school for 8+. I don't know if my parents thought about it at the time, but there was never any talk about it.

    I'm all for skipping grades. Being smart enough is only one part of it. If the child has the mentality & deisre to do it & the parents don't put pressure on the child, then it's definitely doable. Being physically smaller could be an issue because I know kids can be cruel, but all one can do is hope no one teases the child.
     
  17. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Mar 22, 2011

    So could a child just miss the Writing test?
     
  18. TripleTeach

    TripleTeach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 22, 2011

    The Mysterious Benedict Society is a another good book.
     
  19. porque_pig

    porque_pig Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 22, 2011

    I did.
     
  20. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    233

    Mar 22, 2011

    There is no mandate for a child to take any test - it's a mandate for the school to make them. So, if a child is somehow exempt or otherwise not present/available (or for whatever reason) doesn't take the test, it doesn't matter for the child. While some schools/teachers use TAKS or similar assessments to analyze student progress, most don't - at least not meaningfully. Typically, the child is already out of the grade by the time s/he gets the assessment, and so much time has passed that basing instructional decision-making on 6-month-old assessment data doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

    For example, if a child transfers in from out of state, that child is not expected to retroactively go back and take all previous tests from previous years. They simply take whatever tests come next.

    One other consideration - some administrators may be motivated to put the child in a lesser grade because they would probably score better on the assessment from the lower grade. This is definitely not, however, a decision made in the child's best interest, but in the administration's best interest. I would be mindful of that factor when talking to the administrator is s/he suggests that the lower grade would be better.

    There has definitely been a lot of advice given about whether to "skip" the grade, but in the end I think it is a highly individual decision. Even when there is substantial research behind certain educational decisions (e.g., retention), it is always best to consider the specific needs/variables of the individual in question, not just do what "typically" works or what has worked for other people. This is valuable information for sure, but it only goes so far!
     
  21. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Mar 22, 2011

    Teachers should be able to differentiate. I have had very advanced children in kindergarten, but skipping a grade was never discussed. Maybe check with the principal, and see if she qualifies for a GT program.
     
  22. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,463
    Likes Received:
    1,491

    Mar 23, 2011

    I won't give my opinion, but I'll tell you about a student I had last year:

    A fourth grade teacher in my district had a daughter in Kindergarten who was extremely bright. Anyway, at the end of her Kindergarten year, he pulled some strings and got her to skip first grade (this sort of thing never happens in my district). Not only did she skip first grade but she was going to be enrolled in my 2nd grade GATE (Gifted and Talented Education) class.

    I definitely had my reservations about her being in my class, mainly because she was only FIVE years old (she turned six in late September).

    Because she skipped first grade, she definitely had a few "holes" in her learning, but I was able to catch her up quickly.

    Anyway, not only was she much smaller than the rest of the girls, but she was much less mature than them. She cried easily and took quite a while to get used to the competitive nature of a GATE classroom.

    All in all, she did extremely well in my class. At the end of the school year, though, her parents decided to pull her out of public school and homeschool her for the rest of her school career...
     
  23. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,280
    Likes Received:
    748

    Mar 23, 2011

    Fourth graders in Texas take writing, math, and reading.
     
  24. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,280
    Likes Received:
    748

    Mar 23, 2011

    We get our TAKS scores in mid-May. For fourth graders, the tests are not tied by law to passing to the next grade as the math and reading tests in fifth grade are, but they are based on the standards so we use them when looking at retention candidates.

    But not all schools and districts do that as Ed mentioned.
     
  25. ozteach

    ozteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 24, 2011

    The school should assess her properly to place her. In my school, we grade skip as part of our Gifted program, but the children are thoroughly tested first. Most importantly, is she socially ready for the kids who are slightly older?
     
  26. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Mar 24, 2011

    Really there could be a lot of options here. One option is that they could place her in an older class for subject areas she excels in and in her regular grade level for the rest of the classes, specials, lunch, recess, etc. She wouldn't skip but she could be getting the coursework for a higher grade level. Some schools would do this and others would differentiate in the classroom. There could be other options still that this school would be willing to try. Your best bet really is to talk to the school and see what they tell you.
     
  27. DaleJr88AmpFan

    DaleJr88AmpFan Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 24, 2011

    As I am reading this, I am thinking I could have been writing this very thread EXCEPT for wanting to accelerate my own child.

    My 2nd grader is a very bright child... borderline gifted. She rarely makes mistakes on theme/chapter tests, homework, or classwork. She is reading WAY beyond her peers and equal to many of my higher 5th grade students. Her fluency is excellent. She understands and uses the reading comprehension strategies effectively. She is doing multiplication and division- though not double digit yet. She is completely fluent in addition/subtraction facts. She is one of five students that has an accelerated spelling list that many of my fifth graders would have trouble with. As I look at her, I am truly amazed at her performance.

    That being said, I have never even contemplated having her skip a grade. She needs to be with her peer group for her social and emotional development. Her academics can be pushed and differentiated to meet her needs. BUT, her social and emotional development has its' own timeline-- it can not be rushed. My daughter is one of the older 2nd graders with a November birthday and, yes, she can interact with and get along with many 3rd graders. BUT, there are times when she is not developmentally ready to deal with some of the "things" that the 3rd graders are.

    As a 5th grade teacher, I see my "younger" students struggle throughout the year for different reasons. Primarily, though, academics does not suffer. However, I see more issues with immaturity, friendships, and the inability to focus on some of the tasks given. I can usually tell within a few weeks who my youngest kids are... we had a Sept. 1st birthday cut-off. So, there would be students that were 364 days older than others in the same room. That can be a HUGE hurdle to overcome-- one year in the life of a young child is momentous. Think about puberty and all the changes that happen then. Also, you need to look at how she is going to be accepted by her new group of students. Will they readily accept her or will her skipping a grade cause discontent thus allowing for bullying and such? And will she be prepared or able to deal with those situations given her age and social maturity?

    Truly, if I were you, I would talk to the administration and classroom teacher. I would ask for differentiated instruction/assigments be given rather than the acceleration of grades. If her behavior is a concern now, it may continue to be so in the future and expectations will be placed higher. (Please note: I do not buy into kids acting out because they are bored theory. I have had some TRULY gifted, I might go so far as to say Genius, students in the past. Those kids have never been behavior problems. They found things to do to keep themselves busy, to strive for additional challenges, and to learn in spite of being farther advanced than their peer group.)

    Off my soapbox... I hope that you look seriously at her social and emotional development as you think of advanced promotion of grades. A good teacher and administration will provide your daughter with plenty of academic endeavors to meet her needs. Good luck...
     
  28. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    233

    Mar 24, 2011

    That's interesting teacherintexas - thanks for the correction there. I guess it isn't helpful in planning instruction as you get it in mid-May, but at least it could help in retention decisions...
     
  29. SuzieQ

    SuzieQ Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 25, 2011

    I agree with DaleJr88AmpFan. 8.
     
  30. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,592
    Likes Received:
    4

    Mar 25, 2011

    I also agree with DaleJr88AmpFan. I was consolidated from my school once and had a group of very bright second graders who the principal decided to skip to third grade, for the reason of not having to make a 1/2 combo class. I recommended against it to the parents-they went along with it anyway. I talked to the teachers who got the children and it really was hard on the children.
     
  31. Shake

    Shake New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 30, 2011

    update

    I switched her to public school after some serious issues with her private school. I want time to research my options as far as other private schools, charter schools, and give public school a chance. She is being tested for GT classes. She really likes the extra's that public school has to offer but, she thinks the work is easy. As of right now we are just keeping up with her math and reading at home. Since this is her first week in public school there have been a few adjustment issues. She is used to more individualized attention. In her private school there were reading groups and now she has to read what everyone else does. I appreciate everyone's advice. I am going to give this until the end of the year and then see how things are going.
     
  32. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Mar 31, 2011

    That stands out to me as being a bit strange...That is not what teachers in my school do. Weird!

    Keep us updated!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. MrsC
Total: 419 (members: 1, guests: 392, robots: 26)
test