Single Subject Waiver

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by hopeleslienlove, Apr 10, 2005.

  1. hopeleslienlove

    hopeleslienlove New Member

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    Apr 10, 2005

    I'm currently at National Univ. getting my M.Ed and Credential in elem. ed.

    My bf is also at NU getting his M.Ed and Credentials in Secondary ed. We went to he orientation where they explained the exams we have to take. The advisor told the group that secondary teachers do not need to take the cset (single subj) if they have a their four year degree in a subject area they would want to teach. so if you have a BA in history, you don't need to take the CSET in history, you would just have to go through the formalities of the credential classes...

    My bf has his degree in Psychology and he is also a former nurse and he wants to teach Psychology and or Biology... well, does he have to take the CSET to teach those psychology elective classes in high school if he has a degree in psychology? And, i KNOW he has to take the CSET if he wants to teach Biology.. but when you only want to teach Biology do you have to take the WHOLE science CSET.. that includes chemistry, physics etc..? i'm not familiar with the single subject cuz i only know of the mulitple subject stuff...

    Any replies would be greatly appreciated :)
     
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  3. boojie2

    boojie2 New Member

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    Apr 10, 2005

    if he wants to teach biology class in middle school or high school and he does not have a bio degree he must pass sections 118,119,120 of the cset, yes this means physics, astronomy etc, etc....i passed 118,119 the first time with little review...I almost passed 120 the first time as well...tell him it's worth at least a try to see if he can pass....

    i don't know about the psychology though since it would be an elective class.....
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2005
  4. hopeleslienlove

    hopeleslienlove New Member

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    Apr 11, 2005

    thanks for that response!! good luck to you :)
     
  5. JAMIE

    JAMIE Rookie

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    are you positive that is right? doesnt nclb affect kids from k-12? if he doesnt have to take a test, thats fricken awesome.
     
  6. socalteach

    socalteach New Member

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    Actually, if all your bf wants to teach is Biology, he can get a Specialized Credential in Bio only. He would only have to take 2 CSET exams, the biology one and the specialized biology one. They are extremely in depth!
     
  7. earthmommy2003

    earthmommy2003 Rookie

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    May 13, 2005

    Here's how this works: your husband can get a subject matter authorization by having a degree in the subject he wants to teach OR having 33 semester units in the subject he wants to teach. HOWEVER, from what I understand he must have a valid teaching credential to begin with in order to get that subject matter authorization. I could be wrong about that though.
     
  8. mrslmorrison

    mrslmorrison New Member

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    May 17, 2005

    I have gone around in circles with my advisor about this very issue because I HATE TESTS and the CSET is a nightmare for me. Because of the new credentialling requirements that went into effect recently, if you are a first time credential candidate, regardless of elementary or secondary intent, you have to take the CSET. Atleast, that's what I've been told by the program I am in.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 17, 2005

    Doublecheck that with your local Teacher Recruitment Center (there are six in the state: the one for San Diego is at www.teachsocal.org) or county office of education, or with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, www.ctc.gov. If you're single subject AND got a BA or BS in the subject you want to teach through an authorized prep program, you should be able to get a waiver.
     
  10. cbickley

    cbickley Rookie

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    Waivers are very difficult to get. I have several History majors in my program and they have been unable to get the waivers from their schools. There is more to the waiver requirement than just a subject matter major, there is an education coursework component as part of the BA/BS as well. My math major classmate has one from UCSC but she knew she wanted to teach math before she graduated ('02) so she was able to take the appropriate coursework. Also the unit requirements are not just total units but a certain number of upper and lower division units. Yes, a major may cover this but often the educational component is missing. You must get the waiver from the institution that issued your degree.

    I had the units and the education component but I graduated in 1990 and could not get the waiver. So don't count on it.

    I did pass all the CSET's however... so I've now satisfied the SS Science subject matter requirement.

    Good luck!
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    And the approved prep programs I referred to are the ones that give the major AND the teaching coursework. Many universities that offer majors in areas for which credentials are available don't have waiver programs at all.

    The general rule, I suppose, is that if you don't know whether your undergraduate education makes you eligible for a waiver, it probably didn't.
     
  12. Elmer

    Elmer New Member

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    Jul 16, 2005

    According to NCLB every new teacher must be higly qualified, this means, you have to pass the CSET, it does not matter if you majored in the subject you want to teach, (different schools have waivers, this usually entails taking a huge load of classes ). I recently graduated with a history degree and am required to take the CSET to teach Social Science.
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    If there isn't now a requirement for a minimum number of college units, there may very well be one soon.
     
  14. mindshaper

    mindshaper New Member

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    Jul 18, 2005

    I too have a BA in history and was not able to get a waiver from my school. They said I had to have majored in Social Science since there is no History credential. And I also hate the CSET exams! Why are they so expensive???
     
  15. peter

    peter Rookie

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    Apr 17, 2006

    Study material for 118 and 119

     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 18, 2006

    There are study suggestions in a great many of the threads on this subforum, and some of the threads have been posted on today. One good place to start is with the CSET Web site: go to the Test Guides page, click on Science, and click on the document labeled either Subject Matter Requirements or Content Specifications (NES may be in the middle of renaming these). This gives you what amounts to a summary of the information in the state Content Specifications for science - though it does relieve you of having to read through the K-6 material. In any case, you can use this document as a source of terminology to look upon the Internet. Careful, active reading will go far in preparation for these exams.
     
  17. peter

    peter Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2006

    I am aware of the resources available at the CSET website. It will be interesting to know what other study material are available since 118 includes a variety of subject material (Astronomy, Dynamic Processes of the Earth, Earth Resources, Waves, Forces of motion, Electricity and magnetism) and 119 includes Ecology, Genetics and Evolution, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Cell and Organismal Biology, Heat Transfer and Thermodynamics, Structure and Properties of matter. For me, some of the topics in 119 will definitely be a challenge. Are there any good testprep materials which covers these topics without going into any great depths?
    I will appreciate a feedback.
     
  18. peter

    peter Rookie

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    CSET costs arm and a leg

    CSET costs arm and a leg because NES has sole monopoly and is answerable to CTCC alone. To them , the testtaking clientale does not matter.
     
  19. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 18, 2006

    You could try the SparkCharts sold by Barnes & Noble - these are laminated study guides, and you'll find them in a big wire rack near the test-preparation books. The science ones are reasonably well illustrated. The last time I checked, there were SparkCharts on biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, astronomy, geology, environmental science, physics, physics formulas, and chemistry lab procedures, and that doesn't even count the SparkCharts that are oriented toward medicine.

    And there are other resources mentioned in various of the threads on CSET Science. I can't tell you which one resource is best - that always depends on the individual's background and learning style, because there's no one resource that works equally well for everybody.
     
  20. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    I'll restate what I said on another thread. I used Usborne's Internet-linked Science Encyclopedia for 118 and 119. It has lots of graphics and is written in a non-technical style. It covers all the areas on those subtests, although not in enough detail in some of the areas, unless you actually peruse the relevant links. Others have not had the same experience, though, in at least one case because they did not follow the links.

    I like SparkCharts. You get just about all the relevant information in a few pages. The problems I have with them are that it is not always clear just which ones you need to buy to get sufficient coverage and the cost starts to rise quickly if you buy enough of them to be sure of covering all areas.

    Check out the other threads for other options.
     
  21. aciervo

    aciervo Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2006

    I used the recommended sources in the CSET Science test outline and it worked for me. I passed both general science subtest I and II on the first try. Conceptual Physical Science by Hewitt will cover all of test I and the chem. portion of II, and Biology by Campell and Reece will cover most of II. I just made sure I studied everything outlined on the test guide. I had no background in Science whatsoever, so if you already have some you may not need to study as intensely as I did. Subtest I is not very difficult and not at all confusing. Subtest II is a bit more challenging but was much easier than I expected. Also, I will note that the math on either of these subtests is very minimal and not difficult at all. I didn't really need the calculator provided.
     
  22. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    I'll second the opinion that the first two CSET Science subtests are not very difficult. I took both during the same session and had plenty of time to make a first pass through for the easy MC questions, a second pass for the harder ones, plenty of time for the CR questions, and plenty of time to review everything. For me, too, the second was a bit harder because I really never cared much for biology. And I could have done without the calculator, too.

    FWIW if you go for specialized science via Subtest IV, it should actually be easier than the first two. It consists of questions pulled from the first two tests in the specific subject. The difficult test is Subtest III. That is the one that goes into depth in the subject. Of course, in one sense it is easier. It is entirely on your chosen subject.
     

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