Silly question, but I have to ask

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by philateach, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. philateach

    philateach Rookie

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    Okay, so I completely understand that it is favorable to have a dual certification, but some of these job postings seem very unrealistic.

    For example, I'm seeing (in PA) postings for English positions, but when I access the ad, it will say 'must be certified in English and Science' or 'English and Math'.

    Seriously, who is certified in English and Science?

    I just had to ask. . . :dizzy:
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    High school or middle school postings?

    I have my English and math for high school, but have all my content area endorsements for middle school.

    The reason that schools can ask for this is because there are so many teachers applying for a position, that schools can be a little more choosy in what certifications they want.
     
  4. philateach

    philateach Rookie

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    The postings were for middle school. Is that they way middle school is going these days? I'm assuming this would be for team teaching?

    Any info you could provide is greatly appreciated.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    In my district MS, teachers teach 2 content areas in grades 5 and 6.
     
  6. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    I also have all the certifications for middle school including foreign language. I would think that since middle school is departmental principals may want to have the flexibility of having a teacher teach 3 periods of math, 2 of science, 1 of foreign language, etc. At my daughter's middle school I noticed that several teachers were placed in more than one or two subjects.

    It would make sense according to enrollment. Why hire a full time science teacher when there are only 2 periods of science needed? That's my opinion.
     
  7. cartwheels

    cartwheels Rookie

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    It's very likely that they have all of their current teachers' schedules worked out and they realized that there are, for example, two periods of math and three periods of English that they don't have coverage for. So, instead of hiring two part time teachers, they would rather hire one full-time teacher who has the dual endorsement. That would be my guess, anyway.

    I think it's more common for teachers to have multiple content area endorsements at the middle school level vs. the high school level, as well.
     
  8. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    I agree. The requirements for area endorsements for high school require a lot more credit hours than for middle school.
     
  9. philateach

    philateach Rookie

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    That makes sense. These are the things they don't tell you in grad school! Thanks, guys.
     
  10. moomoo

    moomoo New Member

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    EXPERIENCE OUTSIDE OF PCE AND DT

    Good day,

    I'm working on obtaining my SP ED / ELEMENTARY ED certification. My concern is that I do not have any prior experience working with children in an educational setting and possibly the experience I gain during student teaching will not be sufficient enough to stand out on my resume.

    It appears gaining employment as a certified teacher in various school districts is NJ has proven to be competitive. I just wanted to know should I be concerned about not having some work experience working with students.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    That experience certainly would be beneficial, not just in terms of being hired but also in terms of dealing with your future students.

    You have some time yet before the job hunt-- why not get that experience between now and then?

    In these days of budget cuts, everyone is looking for volunteers. So volunteer in a school, in an after school program, teach religion, work with Special Ed kids. Coach kickline or debate or work on the play.

    Not only will your resume benefit, but you'll learn quite a bit about your future career.
     
  12. moomoo

    moomoo New Member

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    @Aliceacc,

    Thank you. Glad to know I'm on the right track. Good to know I wasn't over thinking this and it is a good idea to gain experience working with children in addition to PCE and DEMO-TEACHING.

    This forum is quite invaluable in that experienced teachers provide great advise and knowledge.

    Regards.
     
  13. philateach

    philateach Rookie

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    I agree with Alice.
    As a career changer, I did not have any experience with students. So, the semester before I student taught, I volunteered at an afterschool program, tutoring small groups of middle schoolers. I tutored in and outside of my subject area, too. Make sure to stand out and get a letter of recommendation for the coordinator if you can!

    I included this experience on my resume and I always discuss it in interviews because I learned so much.

    I found the opportunity through my college's student job site, BTW.
     
  14. philateach

    philateach Rookie

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    oops! I meant from the coordinator.
     
  15. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    In Texas, you can get certification for all subjects in grades 4-8.
     
  16. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    I think it's different in every state but in NJ for middle school certification, you need a k-5 cert, 15 credits in the subject area you wish to teach, plus a passing score on the middle school praxis exam in that content area. I'm certified to teach MS LAL, MS SS, Elem. ed, and SPED. I have seen job listings that require much more than that. I saw one a couple of months back that wanted all of that plus science and math AND a reading specialist cert. This was all for a self-contained SPED class. Really? It does seem unrealistic but I guess there are people who have all those credentials and, in this job market, schools can afford to be very selective.
     
  17. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Wow, CA is very different - a single subject credential is for grades 6-12. MS and HS are not separated. Someone with a multiple subject (elementary) credential can usually teach middle school core classes (usually ELA/History), but that happens most frequently at the sixth grade level, and sixth grade is often elementary in my particular area of the state anyway. If you have a multiple subject credential, you can also get an authorization in individual subjects to teach grades 6-9, but I'm not sure how marketable that is right now since most middle and high schools probably want people with the single subject credential.

    That said, I have seen some weird job postings as well requiring single subject credentials in multiple (sometimes unrelated) areas. This is an employer's market and they can afford to be choosy - they'll still be able to find someone who fits the requirements, I'm sure!
     
  18. Catcherman22

    Catcherman22 Companion

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    Sometimes these are written for specific people so nobody else will apply for the job. I know schools in our district have done this in the past.

    Having said that.. it's not science and English.... but our Department head is certified in both math and English.
     
  19. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    In middle school it'd be easy to have those- in my state anyway you have to pick at least 2 subject areas to be certified in for a middle childhood education program. For HS, however, you majored in the subject area and minored in education, so you could only pick one subject area.

    However, I have seen some pretty ridiculous postings when I was job searching. These were all for HS- I saw them because my state's department of ed lumped all the jobs together.
    -Must be certified to teach Spanish, French, and Latin (???)
    -Must be highly qualified in HS Math, Science, and Special Education (did this person go to school for 12 years?)
    -Full time position: 1 bell of English, 3 bells of Spanish, and 2 bells of Woodshop (haha)
     
  20. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    In Virginia, once you have your license, you can become HQ in anything you want by taking the Praxis II exam.

    It wouldn't have been hard for me to be HQ in math, science, and sped if I had done my grad emphasis on sped instead of STEM. My undergrad science degree included a math minor.
     
  21. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    From what I've been reading on here, it seems like it is easier to get multiple certifications in some states than in others. I think NY is similar to NJ's requirements. You can't just take a test and get certified in an additional subject.
    If I were you I would look up the PA requirements and see what your options are.
     
  22. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Well this is in my home state, where you can not be highly qualified in something simply by taking the praxis. You have to complete a college program and student teaching in each area. My roommate wanted to be certified in both English and History for HS, and every college she looked at told her it would be an absolute minimum of 6 years in undergrad for that.
     
  23. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    Philateach, once you have your PA license in one endorsement, you should be able to add other endorsements just by passing the Praxis II exam in the corresponding area.
     
  24. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    My hubby's in Philly and he just added middle years science to his high school math, middle years math, and business/computer certifications. The school he is switching to needed a math/science 7th grade teacher (he had been doing high school math and computer science). It definitely seems to be more and more common for schools to want more than one cert so that there's more flexibility with scheduling and dealing with whatever needs they have for that year.
     
  25. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Does anyone know about IT positions. Their requirements or basically for a person to be a computer expert, but then they still have to have a teaching degree. I just don't think hardly anyone has those type of advanced tech credentials, tech skills, and tech experience, plus a teaching degree on top of that. That's like being an IT specialists and a teacher. 2 professions. Who are these people that can do all of that?

    I just find it confusing.

    ((And I'm mad that my husband would totally qualify if he had the teaching degree. Salary is 80k))
     
  26. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    web- Do they have to teach technology classes as well as be the "tech" person in the building to fix computers and things like that? That's the only thing I could think of where they would need both. Our "IT guys" only have the IT specialst degree, but they only work on our computers and stuff, they don't work with kids.
     
  27. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    waterfall, it was IT coordinator, so they wouldn't be teaching directly, but they would be in charge of all things technology for the entire district.
     

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