Sight Words

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by bamagirl10, Sep 15, 2006.

  1. bamagirl10

    bamagirl10 Rookie

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    Sep 15, 2006

    How do you teach your children sight words....other than drill and practice with flash cards?
     
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  3. diro.pams

    diro.pams Companion

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    Sep 16, 2006

    We dedicate a portion of our white board to an ever increasing list of our sight words. The kids read through them each day. During the second half of the year I will form the word using 1 box to represent each letter (h,l,k,t,f get a tall box, g,j,yq,p get a hang down box, x,c,a,n,m get a short box.(Four Blocks and other programs use this system.) The kids are given time to look and think about which word is represented, then they guess. This is a good analyzing technique that causes kids to look at letter patterns
     
  4. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2006

    Word searches, word snakes, make the words with playdough, do magic writing (a candle and paint over it), make the words with wool or pipe cleaners, write letters on wooden cubes and get them to make the word. Play Bingo, or Beetle. To play Beetle, make a dice using a blackline master for a cube or use your wooden cubes and write or stick the sightword on the dice. The students then have to throw 'the' for a body, 'and' for a head, etc until they have a complete Beetle (this is adapted from a number dice, 6 for a body (you can't start unless you have the body), 5 for a head, 4 for a tail, 3 for a eye (you need to roll this twice for each eye), 2 for an antenna (again twice) and 6 times you need to get a 1 for the legs.



    Play 'Kings and Queens' - one boy and one girl stand up and have to identify the sightword as quickly as possible. The one who is the slower sits down and another child of the same sex stands up to take their place. They love this game and there really aren't any winners or losers.
     
  5. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2006

    Try and put the sightwords into a comprehensible sentence, eg, "I am in the".

    At a local school the children's sightword homework is arranged like this. I hope I can explain the system without confusing you! The children are given a folder and inside on the right hand side are stuck 5 pockets. The children are given their sight words to learn. On the first night the children have to try and read the sight words very quickly. If they can't do this, the words stay in pocket 1, when they can identify the words quickly they move into pocket 2. Again, they have to identify the words very quickly, when they can do this (and this may depend on the child, it could be the next night or a few nights later) they get moved into pocket 3. By now they should be able to identify the words not in order (by using the sentence). Once they have mastered their 4 words, they are stuck on the inner left hand page of the folder in a row. The teacher gives them 4 more words to learn and these are stuck under the previous words learned (in columns). The good thing about this method is that children learn at their own pace and it is possible to see who does and doesn't know their sightwords.

    A book (in Australia) called "Meeow Magic" (I think this is what it's called) is specifically about sightwords and has various activities.
     
  6. TXTCHR29

    TXTCHR29 Cohort

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    Sep 16, 2006

    The book "Making Your Word Wall More Interactive" by Creative Teaching Press has some great activites for whole group, small group and independent practice.
     
  7. CBean

    CBean Rookie

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    Sep 16, 2006

    Rainbow Words

    We had the same problem too - sight words = boring. But last year, our principal ordered us all something called Rainbow Words. Now all of the K and some of the 1st grade classes use the rainbow chart at our school. He got it online at rainbowwords.com but I'll try to explain it. We have big rainbows on a bulletin board and then words are added to each color arc. The students have to learn all 6 words in the purple arc and then they get to color in the purple arc on their own paper and they get a little award certificate or pencil. Then they learn words that we put on the blue arc, green, and so on so it's a great motivational tool - not quite as boring as memorizing lists on paper.

    Each arc is bigger and has more words so they try to learn about 60 by the end of the year. We send lists home to the parents and give them activities they can do with their children to make it fun. The kids love it because they feel special when they "pass" a color. Some of them gets really serious about getting to the final red arc and just practice, practice, practice.

    It's also great for us as teachers because we can see who is stuck on the purple arc (I, a, the, in, it, was) and who is zooming through and on red before everyone else. Have you tried anything else besides flashcards? Are the kids just unmotivated? I have a couple of other games you can do with flashcards.
     
  8. tarheelsak

    tarheelsak Companion

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    Sep 17, 2006

    We come up with a sentence that includes each sight word, as well as reviews others. For example, this week we are introducing "and," so each student will give me words to fill in the blanks.....I see the _______ and the _______. This also helps us review the previous sight words. Students are given a sentence strip with their sentence and they illustrate their page. Then we put them in a class book that is laminated and sent home. Students take one class book home a night. When all students have had a chance to take a book home, then they are placed in our reading center. Sometimes, we'll have 6-7 books being rotated at a time. Parents are asked to read with the student first, then help the student read each page, which gives them great repitition for the words. Parents sign in the back of the book so we know they read the book.

    As the year progresses, they sometimes copy the sentences from the paper I give them so they can work on handwriting. We also cut the strip apart sometimes and have them glue the words in the correct order to help with sentence structure. This idea comes from the Four Block series- Building Blocks for Kindergarten.

    We also send home leveled readers from Scholastic and from our Reading Street adoption. We group read them in class, then students take their books home in Ziploc bags to practice with parents, then read independently to myself or my assistant the following day. If they read it successfully, they get checked off. If they can't, they take the book home additional nights until they can read it independently.
     
  9. mhirsch

    mhirsch Companion

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    Sep 17, 2006

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