Sight word to reading connection problems

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by mcronan, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. mcronan

    mcronan Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2006

    Hi there!
    this is my 2nd week in a K class (I'm from 3rd grade originally). My teammate and I are having trouble with our class this year in that they are all young (all are a very young 5 and act like it!) and none went to pre-K or have much constructive family support.
    Our major issue right now is that they can for the most part recognize their sight words on the flash cards and during review.. but put them in a story and forget it!:confused: They are completely thrown by the words that just 15 mins before they were easily recognizing. What types of games and or techniques do you use in your classes to help keep these sight words in their minds during reading? We are also still having trouble with some recognozing their letters.. it's been 9 weeks (+) of school and we're this far behind (one of the reasons I'm here in the first place)! Give me some ideas people... we're desperate. My co-teach partner has been doing this for 20 yrs and she's lost at this point.. we're looking for some new and exciting ideas. No pressure!:D
    Meg
     
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  3. luckyteacher

    luckyteacher Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2006

    I think the important thing is to remember that this is kindergarten. You have kids at lots of different levels. If they are not getting it maybe what your doing is too hard. I teach first and I have a few students that did not go to pre-k or k, could not write their names, and knew few letters. I don't expect them to be at the same point as my first graders with k because they've had more exposure. Just think about it, in nine weeks you want kids with no prior school experience to remember 26 letters and sounds and remember sight words - that's a lot. I think it's more important to monitor what they are doing and work from there, assess what you have to build upon - take lots of anecdotals and see where the needs are for each individual child and work from there. Stay focused on each child making progress - they all will not be at the same point at the same time.

    Also, I think sight words are more easily remembered when they are connected to real reading experiences. Maybe quizzing them with the words outside of the book is part of the problem - teach them in the context of whatever it is that your reading and then connect it to interactive or shared writing. I think that helps a lot.
     
  4. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Oct 23, 2006

    I agree with the above poster and just wanted to add that I have my kids go on a letter hunt in books in the beginning of school. As we learn our sight words, they begin to hunt for those too. I also use a lot of simple books for them to go and cirlce with a pencil or if it's a big book, use a wikki stick to circle. Model and practice with the kids. They will get it.
     
  5. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Oct 23, 2006

    As we learn sight words, we use them in a journal, modeled by the teacher. For instance, we've been doing "I see my ______." where the student draws a picture to represent the final word. We then read it back, one at a time in the small group. We've just practiced "I like my ______." Every time we learn a new word, we practice it in a pocket chart (small group AND whole group) and then students write something in their journals. I agree that it's important to make it "real" for them, not try to make them learn everything in isolation.
     
  6. kteach

    kteach Rookie

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    Nov 1, 2006

    I agree with both o fthe above responses. We do a great deal with the pocket chart as well as in isolation. I will also write out poems or short stories on chart paper and have them circle the sight words that we have been working on.
     
  7. AngelEyes

    AngelEyes Rookie

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    Nov 1, 2006

    I am homeschooling my daughter (who just turned 4) and I made a train engine with her name on it. I explained that we would be learning new words and putting them up on the wall after the engine. Each day I have her read the words to me (she memorizes them, actually--much like your students seem to do). If she reads them all through without any mistakes I add a new word. We're in week 7 of doing the sight words and she has 20 words up now. She doesn't always recognize the words without help, but when I read a book to her I point to each word. When I come to a word that I know is on her Word Train I stop my finger and wait for her to try and remember it. Sometimes she'll get up and go into the kitchen to try and figure out which word it is. Sometimes I'll help her sound it out. Sometimes I'll give her a clue (like "it's a color word"). I also play games with her using the sight words. I made a large pair of dice and put a word on each side. We take turns rolling a die and 'reading' the word. I have her find a certain word in a book and point it out to me. I write letters on lima beans using a Sharpie marker and have her practice forming the words. I have her practice writing the words in sand, in flour, with sidewalk chalk, in chocolate pudding, on a chalk board, etc. I believe that writing and reading instruction go hand in hand :)
     

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