Should this be our goal

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ross, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Jun 4, 2012

    [/I]"If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the immensity of the sea."

    This quote was used by Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and Director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City when he was testifying before congress.

    I believe true need for passion for the material being taught to our students. If I can get the students excited about a subject, they might just invest time learning more the material.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
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  3. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Jun 4, 2012

    I'll pass on that.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think it's a nice goal but extremely lofty. It's so hard to think about making students yearn for learning when so many of them seem to hate it so much (at least at the high school level and in urban settings like the one I teach in).
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Jun 4, 2012

    Oh, I agree about the lofty goal. Many of my students show a clear disdain for learning. I have tried many ways to get them excited about learning coming up just short of standing on my head.

    I still walk into the building resolved to have the students "long for the immensity of the sea" but admit walking out of the building at the end of the day saddened that I have failed.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 4, 2012

    I find if I'm excited about content, my kds are as well.
     
  7. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Jun 4, 2012

    I think excitement for the content can only go so far though... especially as the students get older. I absolutely love history (and teaching it for that matter), and many students remark that I'm the most enthusiastic teacher they've ever had in the subject. But I still have kids in EVERY class period who show complete and utter hatred for the subject.

    Many of them aren't bad kids, and many will even tell me that they like ME, but hate history. Nothing I do seems to change that, regardless of my own level of excitement. And teaching strategies don't seem to change that either. I've lectured, held discussions, done simulations, led cooperative learning, had students do learning stations, and so forth. And there are some students that none of that works for, because they simply despise learning so much. I don't have a solution.....
     
  8. jwteacher

    jwteacher Cohort

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    Jun 4, 2012


    I'm sure you've done a lot in one year to influence them, regardless if you were able to see the results. A student at the high school level, who has had many negative experiences with a certain subject, might be too ingrained with their disdain for history to come around after a year in your class. I bet, however, you set the groundwork for unraveling the perception.
     

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