Should I teach. . . a little?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Perturbative, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2008

    Firstly, sorry if this topic comes up often. I didn't run into any immediate threads whose circumstances were similar to mine, so I decided to brave it and start a new one.

    I have two to four years where one of my employment options may be to teach high school. I have not applied yet and may not actually get a job, but I have some reason to believe the opportunity is there (they have need for someone with my educational background, which is a masters degree in a mathematical science).

    I have teaching experience, but only at the college level. These are primarily freshman students. Some of this teaching experience is entirely independent (including determining the lesson plan and being the sole teacher in the class). I have never taken any classes in education and have no understanding of exactly how teaching high school will be different (but am learning - feel free to educate me).

    I love to teach. I am an excellent public speaker and comfortable in front of crowds, including classrooms. I enjoy engaging students and do feel satisfaction when they learn something.

    I have no intention of teaching for a living. My mind could change - and what better way to find out whether it should - but the plan is to change jobs in 2-4 years.

    So should I go for it and work hard for a couple of years as a secondary school teacher, or am I playing with fire? Do I have much to lose by trying? Do the school system or students?

    I could definitely have done more research before I posted this, except that I hadn't considered the option until recently, and feel I have limited time to apply for jobs. Your insight could speed things up.

    Thanks in advance for any responses.
     
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  3. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    How would teaching be an option, are you certified? Why would you consider this option if you aren't interested in it as a career?
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I'm sure that you could get a job should you apply with your degree; however, if you aren't going to be in the career for more than 2 years, why even do it? If this is something that you do want to do, I wouldn't disclose this information of leaving in a couple of years because that will definitely not get you hired.
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    If you have no intention of teaching for a living, then no, don't do it. It takes you at least 2 years to get "warmed-up" and learn the ropes in teaching. The 1st year is often a nightmare for new teachers, no matter what background they come from. You may think your past experience prepares you, but you will find the reality to be quite different.
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    If you really feel you aren't going to do it for a living, don't do it. HOWEVER, I got my degree to become a legal assistant. THat was some years ago. I never took a job doing anything remotely close to it. Do I feel I can pick it up now? Nope. I wouldn't be hired based on that paper years ago.

    Having said that, just because you work 3 years now doesn't mean that if you change your mind 10 years from now that it will be feasible or easy.

    Don't do it if your heart isn't into it though. This is a burnout job and requires your heart and soul to make it work. It's highly rewarding but only if you are into it.
     
  7. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    As a note, I've verified I'm employable in the short term without certification. Obviously it makes me less qualified than other candidates.

    This is a reasonable question from both you and jw13 - why bother?

    For the first year or two I would be making more teaching secondary school than most other jobs I'd consider. Teaching does have a much lower salary progression over time, but if I'll be changing careers anyways, then teaching is actually surprisingly lucrative compared to most other jobs I'd be working for a short period.

    More importantly, I love teaching. Of course, a love of teaching doesn't necessarily mean I'd actually love being a teacher - I understand there is a great deal more to it than that. That is one reason I'm tossing this out for everyone to kick around. I believe people's reactions will really speed up my ability to gauge whether it is a good idea.

    To give a comparison, another option available to me is part or full time data entry work, which will be 8-5, every bit as unexciting as it sounds, and pay less. How often do you have people ask about teaching because of its financial appeal? :D

    Yes this is one thing I was curious about - how often people pass through. It sounds like being honest may not be a good choice, which could toss me out of the running early. I don't fib well.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Teaching is most difficult in the first couple of years. I feel like if you entered the teaching field and taught for only a couple of years, you would have a very skewed perception about what it means to be a teacher. I think that with no real background in K-12 (or 7-12) education--and no real desire to commit a lot to the field--it might not be a great experience.

    Having said that, I love teaching and I think it's a great job for the right kind of people. I would never want to turn people away from the field. It's just that I've never met someone who only sort of wanted to be a teacher... usually teachers say that they are Teachers and that teaching is a vocation or calling, something that's in their blood.
     
  9. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    I have never heard of anyone "passing through."
     
  10. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    Could you expand on what is it about these first two years that will be especially hard? Now I believe you when you say that it will be hard, I'm just curious about if it is anything I can prepare for. I'll certainly know the subject well, but you're absolutely right that I won't know much about the actual practice of teaching in that environment.

    First year difficulties sounds like something I can get info on with a search, so I'll go try that.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    People very rarely "pass through" teaching on their way to something else.

    It's like "passing through" earning your MD. It just doesn't really happen like that. Teaching is a destination for most people (and for the best teachers).
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Depending on your school, you might get absolutely zero support from administration and no mentoring in your first year. This sort of experience is dishearteningly common for first-year teachers. What it means is that it is very likely that no one will tell you where to find certain forms (there's a LOT of paperwork in teaching), that certain forms even exist, how to document events and behaviors, and how to effectively manage a classroom.

    Depending on where you get assigned, you might experience frequent inappropriate behaviors--usually they throw inexperience, unlicensed teachers into those sorts of positions. If you don't know how to handle one kid who is insubordinate or disruptive, you will very likely have 30-40 insubordinate or disruptive kids by the end of the week.

    Classroom management is a killer issue for most new teachers, even teachers who learned good strategies in their teacher education programs.
     
  13. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    First of all, you may know your subject, but you spend the first couple of years understanding and developing lessons for the curriculum, which is different for every grade level. Then you have class management, time management, addressing special needs students, etc. This all takes time to develop, not just preparation.
     
  14. Briana008

    Briana008 Companion

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    Apr 18, 2008

    Perturbative, I have four years of teaching experience at the college level (mostly freshmen non-majors) and next year will start my first year teaching high school. I'll let others expand on why the first couple of years are so hard, since I haven't lived it yet, but I can (maybe) offer some insight about high school vs. college.

    The absolute biggest difference I have encountered between high school and college is the amount of grading and assignments, and I guess paperwork in general. I know this can differ depending on the type of teacher, but my mentor teacher during student teaching encouraged me to take up some sort of assignment nearly every day to make sure the students stayed on task and that they were actually getting something out of the lessons. I spent much more time grading (even if it was just for completion I still read everything to make sure they got the main idea) than I ever did with the college classes.

    I'm with you--I love teaching and people say I'm great at public speaking. At least in my experience, though, high schoolers don't want a public speaker. In college you can get away with doing more lecture and students generally listen (because someone's paying for it). I had to minimize my lecture and find ways to actively involve my HS students while student teaching. That has the potential to be frustrating to a teacher, but in my case I just see it as a challenge that I enjoy meeting. I love coming up with new ideas or variations on lessons and I really enjoy seeing my students get excited by an activity or lab. That's why, even though I love teaching the college students too, I really see myself as a high school teacher.

    For what it's worth, I found that my college teaching experience put me way ahead of many of my education classmates. Really the only thing I felt like I needed to work on was classroom management strategies (which, unfortunately, we didn't discuss until AFTER my student teaching, and then for only two class periods).

    I do have another question for you. Say you do take a teaching job for a couple of years then change careers. Wouldn't you still have to start at that entry-level job? Or would this teaching experience actually better qualify you for the job you really want? I think the best advice is to follow the path that will lead you to your dream job, regardless of whether or not you have to pinch pennies a bit for the first couple of years. :2cents:

    Good luck with your decision, and feel free to PM me if you have other questions about transitioning from college to HS teacher.

    ~Briana~
     
  15. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    Teaching wouldn't advance me in the next job I want, but if I had some free time while I taught (hey, why is everyone laughing now?) then I could actually make some fantastic progress towards my future goals.

    Thanks to everyone who replied! I have very little time to make some big decisions and all the information really helps.

    By the way, does anyone here have any comments on whether teaching math is less or more trouble than most other subjects in high school?

    Hope you all have good weekends!
     
  16. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    The reason we chuckle is because every time you ask if something is more or less work/trouble we grin from ear to ear because teaching is hard work period. It is even more mind boggling the first year. It isn't something you want to get into just to pass some time towards something else. It is HARD for those first few years. What I would like to know is what ARE your future goals and how would this help you towards them.
     
  17. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Sure. First, do you know how to write and implement an IEP? You will be expected to know that, but no one will teach you how -- and since it is a federal document, it must be done correctly and implemented properly.

    Are you familiar with most types of learning disabilities and behavioral disorders? You will have many of them. In many cases, no one will even warn you about them until discipline spirals completely out of control.

    Do you know how to teach using manipulatives and hands-on lessons? Strict lecture (or "sage on a stage" as it is called) is frowned upon. Hands-on is the key.

    You may know how to do syllabus from teaching college, but do you know to write a 6-part lesson plan, or using the Madeline Hunter format for your DAILY lesson plans? You will be expected to know this and use them flawlessly. It takes a while to get the hang of it.

    Do you know how to work with adolscents and all of their hormone-inspired problems?

    As a new teacher without certfiication, you will be expected to begin immediately taking certain trainings and coursework to "bring you up to speed" (remember, they don't know you are planning to leave in 2 years...they will expect you to become FULLY certified within 2 years.) These trainings and courses take place on your own time with no payment for your time.

    At college, you have very little interaction with parents. At high school, you will have every parent imaginable to deal with. (Usually before or after hours on your own time.) The perfectionist parent who wants to argue with your grading over 1 or 2 points, the indulgent parent who thinks you are too hard on his child, the neglectful parent who only came in because of retention (and waited until it was too late to actually do something about it.) etc. etc.

    That is the last thing, teaching is a very solitary job. You rarely interact with your colleagues. It can be very isolating.

    Also, as a new teacher, there is a good chance you won't actually have your own physical classroom and will be "on a cart." Are you prepared for not having place to 'hang your hat?" It happens more often than you'd think.

    Oh, and if you are really fortunte, you might get an administrator who won't support you, will overrule your decisions, scrutinize your lesson plans and teaching with a fine tooth comb, and put you on a plan of action, which will make you jump through a dozen hoops to keep your job. They are everywhere out there.

    I could go on.

    There is a part of me that is a bit offended to think of you considering teaching as a "passing through" job. Most teachers are very passionate about teaching -- and the ones who just look at teaching as "a job" are not terribly popular with us. If teaching high school is the best paying job you can get right now, I feel really sorry for you. And if that is your prime motivation for going into teaching, I feel sorry for your potential students.
     
  18. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Teaching, especially in the first year, can be a nightmare. If you're not totally passionate about it, I don't see how you could even survive the first month. I came into teaching from a non-traditional background, however, I an more than willing to put up with the crud that gets thrown at me because I'm so in love with my job. It's that kind of passion that makes all of the negatives worth it.

    There's no substitute for "being there". You can research all you want, but you won't be able to get a good idea of what really goes on until you walk into a classroom. That's why ed programs do practicums and student teaching. Even with that, first year teachers often have a miserable time of it. Teaching is tough and frequently thankless. I don't reccomend going into it unless you really feel like it's your calling.
     
  19. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Don't forget that the job itself doesn't have enough hours without the students (prep time) to even come close to the actual time you need to accomplish it all. So be prepared to take tons of it home and still wonder where you are going to find the time.
     
  20. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I worked it all out one day...when you factor in all the prep time, grading, parent phone calls, students having emotional meltdowns and all those other non paid hours, I make somewhere around 2 bucks per hour. And that's BEFORE I subtracted out what I spend out of my own pocket to make sure I have what I need in the classroom.
     
  21. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    according to Dewey...

    education is not preparation for life, education is life itself...

    and...

    life is a journey to be lived and not a problem to be solved.

    you are more than welcomed to work any job, and try any career that interests you...

    what I learned is that teaching is a calling, and an institution...in more ways than one. when you accept a position, you are obligated to stay and provide a service.

    you could very well teach 1-5 years, and meet the statistics by leaving if it doesn't work for you.

    you will have a nice little chunk of retirement money, or you can leave it there in case you ever decide to go back.

    I believe what our fellow posters are saying is that your committment level will determine your success. This is not something you want to do for 2 years, and then try something else. According to my research, experience, and fellow teachers...you must be willing to stay in the field at least 5 years to see the fruits of your labor.

    Many people leave for personal or medical reasons.

    But if you only desire to do this one or two years, you may want to consider being a counselor, social worker or even an instructional aide/assistant. Another suggestion would be a special ed teacher, with a caseload of several students, where you float in the building and do not have the day-to-day issues of a classroom teacher.

    Because...you are making a committment to the school, community and children. it is very hard to make attachments, connections and have teachers leave in mid-year.
     
  22. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    My note about passing through has gotten a lot of response, which I appreciate. I actually have it on what I feel is good authority that many more people are teaching high school science and math classes for only short and medium periods of time than may have happened in the past. They then move on to something else.

    What I don't know is whether this is detrimental to the school and teaching system in general.
     
  23. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    As am I! I've said I love teaching many times in the thread.

    I am sorry I offended you.

    Keep in mind how this was presented to me by a few people who know me: I'm a good teacher (or so they believe), I love teaching, I have special experience, and several schools in the area desperately need someone to teach those classes. It's easy for other people to make it sound like it's a win/win situation - that's one reason why I'm posting (and I mention it in my OP), I want to make sure I do little or no harm. It certainly sounds like this is something I should not pursue.

    What can I say, the demand is such that the pay for these specific jobs is surprising. You couldn't have convinced me it would be so high. In any case, don't feel sorry for me. It is true I've had some difficulties very recently that have thrown off my career track, but it will be short lived in the scheme of things, and I expect to do very well after that.
     
  24. Perturbative

    Perturbative Rookie

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    This is really at the heart of the matter. If I go in to teach for a few years, I'll be leaving before I really get a handle on things. I'll just be taking up a slot that someone else could be using to learn the ropes.

    Also thanks RainStorm for the list.
     
  25. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Apr 19, 2008

    The reason so many people move on to something else after a couple of years is because it is HARD not because it is something they are trying to do while doing something else!

    I graduated 5 years ago, and now many of my fellow graduates are leaving the profession.

    It is a hard job, and no one is around to pat your back most of the time. You work alone. You plan alone. You will have to fail or succeed alone. Why don't you go visit a HS in your city to get an idea of what it's like for a HS teacher. The people on this board have been very clear about what to expect. There is a LOT that has to go into teaching.

    First year- adjusting to the "feel" of the school, trying to figure out your schedule, understand the curriculum, write lesson plans, engage the students, discipline the students, write report cards, grade papers, please your principal, take the trainings, manage the students, etc.

    Second Year- refine your classroom management skills, likely learn a WHOLE NEW curriculum (because they will probably change your level, or the curriculum will change), please your principal and make up for the mistakes you made your first year, refine your classroom organization, change the way you grade because you learned last year it didn't work for one reason or another, etc.

    THIRD/FOURTH YEAR- (If you last) feel confident in your management system, have an organized classroom, have a handle on the curriculum, know your principal and colleagues well, have a reputation around the school (good or bad)

    It takes 3-4 years to really become a great teacher.. Even if you get good evals your first year, your second year is a transition year as you take all you learned your first year and try to make the changes to better your classroom. By the third or fourth year you should have everything down.

    The issue with "passing through" is there is a steep learning curve in teaching. It takes a while to get good at it and know what you are doing. The first several months are very HARD. A lot of people feel after 3-5 years that the job is just too hard and too many hassles.

    You really need to love teaching! It's not fair to the students if you don't. The other teachers that do it for a couple years are not role models for people who want to pass through. They probably entered the field with high hopes and were disappointed. It is unfortunate.
     
  26. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Basic description of skills and duties:

    --Works well with other staff members and administrators.

    --Is available for students and parent conferences in a timely manner.

    --Facilities home-school communication regularly.

    --Maintains confidentiality of students and student records.

    --Complies with rules, regulations, and policies.

    --Conducts assigned classes at the time scheduled.

    --Enforces regulations concerning student conduct and discipline.

    --Takes attendance in a timely manner.

    --Maintains detailed daily lesson plans for each course offered using the 6-step lesson plan format as requires by school policy.

    --Provides adequate plans, information, and materials for substitute teachers.

    --Attends and participates in faculty meetings and other assigned meetings.

    --Demonstrates professional practices in teaching.

    --Models correct use of language, oral and written.

    --Uses hands-on activities and models teaching that is appropriate for all learning domains. (ie Visual, Kinesthetic, etc.)

    --Demonstrates accurate and up-to-date knowledge of content.

    --Implements designated curriculum.

    --Participates in professional development opportunities and applies concepts to classroom and school activities.

    --Acts in a professional manner and assumes responsibility for safety and well-being of students.

    --Takes precautions to protect records, equipment, materials, and facilities.

    --Assumes a role in meeting the school’s student achievement goals, including academic gains of students assigned to the teacher

    --Issues grades and completes grade recording in a timely and consistent manner. Returns graded work in a timely manner.

    --Completes required paperwork by assigned due date.

    --Provides accomations to special needs students as presented in Individualized Education Plans or Gifted Enrichment Plans.

    --Available for up to 30 hours of after contract duties as assigned by principal or designee.

    --Serves on committees and/or coaches or advices student activities before or after school hours.

    --Serves as bus duty monitor one afternoon per week.

    --Other duties as assigned.

    --Teachers can be reassigned to another subject, class, or transfered to another school with 2 days notice. The teacher does not have a say in this matter. Teachers are assigned "where needed" based on the needs of the school district.
     
  27. SmartCookie

    SmartCookie Comrade

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    Apr 19, 2008

    Everyone has given excellent advice about the nature of teaching. I think that you really need to take into account if you are really ready for the challenge and the long hours that will be required of you. As a new teacher I never left before 5:00 and then took work home with me.
     
  28. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Alternative certification programs

    I believe you said you already have your teaching certificate, but in case you don't why not consider alternative certification. these programs place you in urban schools, offer great support and training, and PAY you an internship and/or tuition assistance.

    The reason most people drop out is because of lack of support.

    If you found a program like Teach for America, or any other college that offers alternative certification...they will require at least 1-2 years commitment on your part. You can sign up if you already have a degree. You don't have to complete a traditional college of ed program.

    this may be an option for you. you get paid, you get to teach, and you can work 2 years, and if you don't like it...well, you at least had a better support and training..with an understanding that you have a commitment.

    and if you start off in a area at risk, you are already dealing with the most challenging situations..so you will be ready for anything.
     
  29. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    on call

    Rain gives an excellent outline...

    Keep in mind, the image of having summers free and getting off work at 3 is a dream that we all don't see.

    You are expected to come in at all odd hours, 7am for IEP meetings, and stay late for report card conferences, and all the lovely school performances...they start at 7pm, and of course you must stay to see parents and kids, and then clean up...that could last until 9pm

    summers are not yours either. you may be required to attend mandatory in-service, professional development programs. you may even be nominated for summer school.

    You are always 'on'. You can't run to the grocery store in sweats and a hat. SOMEBODY will recognize you. You can't yell at your own kids on the bus stop, somebody will see you.

    It is a calling, a profession, a lifestyle.

    You don't punch out and go home at 3:26 pm.

    Somebody will call, email, or leave you a note on your car, door, mailbox.

    Your wife/husband/bf/family must understand and be accepting of this. If they think all you do is sit on your butt and babysit, you have to show them otherwise.
     
  30. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Apr 21, 2008

    I am a first year teacher, my mom taught for 35 1/2 years, my aunt for 30 years. Its been around me for my entire 32 yrs of life...and I STILL didn't know the entire story of it.

    You can research ALL you want, but no website, book, or pamphlet will prepare you for the reality of a real life classroom with real life students, their real life attitudes and real life drama/scenarios. You gotta get in there and try and screw up and retry over and over. My principal told me that this year was my 'dress rehearsal' THANK THE LORD! My show starts next August and from day one this year I began revamping everything that I thought would work. This is not a profession that you slip into and back out of like a McDonald's drive-thru worker. You cannot learn it in days weeks or months..its years.
    You do have the right to pick whatever job you want to try for, however, consider the dedication that is required...You may have loved teaching when you were teaching college, but elem. and second. schools are way different. You can't lecture for 45 minutes with high school kids and have them writing furiously your every word. They can't stand to write down 4-5 lines on a powerpoint slide!

    I agree with one poster..go observe a real hs classroom. It will open your eyes
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    EEEK mmswm- you need to find ways to be more efficient...work smarter, not harder...$2 per hour? You are eilther in a grossly underpaid district or you are working way too hard. There are ways to get your job done well without killing yourself... I have a colleague who stayed after school everday for 2-3 hours, went home made dinner for her family and then graded papers, worked on lesson plans for the next day until 1 or 2 in the morning- and guess what? She was pretty much ineffective as a teacher...she wasn't natural, not an out of the box thinker- if it wasn't in her plans she didn't know what to do...Long story short, this isn't an easy job. No one goes into teaching to become RICH. I do believe that great teachers are passionate about what they do and that this isn't a 'passing through' profession (it's a profession after all, not just a job).
     
  32. smarkham01

    smarkham01 Companion

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    Contrary to those you seem to have perturbed, I see no reason for you not to try it. Look at the drop out rate for new teachers and, in my opinion, you have at least that good of a chance of staying. Why? First year teachers usually have stars in their eyes and a very romanticized view of teaching. You don't. They pass-through unintentionally, yours will be planned. The frustration they suffer from shouldn't be a problem for you.

    You'll find that teaching college is as different from teaching HS as teachi HS is from teaching elementary. I found college classrooms far more interesting than most HS classroom I've been in. In college the emphasis is usually on knowing that in HS knowing how is the objective and knowing how isn't easily learned from lectures. You mentioned the feeling of satisfaction you have when someone learns something; how do you feel when someone doesn't learn? Or worse, when someone makes little or no effort to learn? The answer to this question will determine the answer to whether your plan would cause harm to students or schools.
     
  33. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    interesting smrkham01... I am considering teaching college sometime in the near future..

    yet, I see no blueprint, teaching credential or anything in writing on how to become a college professor (in IL)

    all I understand is that you must have your masters, (and or X amount of years experience in the field) and most people only find part time or adjunct professor jobs...it is hard to get on permanent. so they say..here in Chicago...

    maybe I will start my own thread..or look around some more..
     
  34. smarkham01

    smarkham01 Companion

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    A masters with 18 hours in the subject field will qualify you at most Junior Colleges in the U.S. A doctorate is required at most (all?) 4 year institutes. Most that I've looked at want some teaching experience, but I've never seen a course on teaching at that level. I believe Pima CC in Tucson has a mandatory course for newly hired teachers, but I haven't looked in ages.

    Full time? They don't need no stinking full timers - cost to much.
     
  35. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    MPK, To teach at the community college level, the minimum you need is a master's, preferably in you desired field, with at least 18 credit hours in your desired field. The CC i work for requires a 30 minute "sample" lesson if you make it to a second interview, but there are no formal courses to teach you how to do it. Intererstingly, they sometimes even shy away from applicants with an academic background in education. My CC actully doesn't even like hiring people with "just" a master's. They prefer a doctorate of some sort, and universities all but require a doctorate, even for some lecturer positions.

    There's also a lot of "who you know" involved. When I got my adjuct position, I went back to the cc where I started my college education, and the dean was the same one who was there when I was a student. I was offered the adjuct position in college prep, I think, because of my record as a student, because I sure didn't have any real teaching experience.
     
  36. Thespis

    Thespis Rookie

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    In some departments, a terminal masters degree is as good as a doctorate.
    For instance, a Masters of Fine Arts in acting or design is as far as you can go in that discipline. Most acting and design professors have an MFA, while most theatre history and dramaturgy professors have a doctorate.
     
  37. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    I have heard a few stories where people tried it like you and ending up loving it. It became their life and passion. If you think you are a good teacher and would enjoy it I say go for it.
     
  38. emmyblemmy

    emmyblemmy Companion

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    I agree wholeheartedly- a bit harsh above, but Rainstorm is essentially right- there are too many teachers who are trying to make this their career and have the hardest time finding jobs. You must be passionate and dedicated to take on this career- not just make it a short passing stage of your life.
     
  39. smarkham01

    smarkham01 Companion

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    >There is a part of me that is a bit offended to think of you considering teaching as a >"passing through" job. Most teachers are very passionate about teaching -- and the >ones who just look at teaching as "a job" are not terribly popular with us.

    Rainstorm, do you feel just as offended at those “passing through” to become curriculum specialists, administrators or other non-classroom employees? How about those who teach until their first child is born, then leave to raise the child? How about those who passing through who become SPED specialists who are supposed to be providing assistance to the lowly teacher having to prepare and implement an IEP?

    What has this person said that would lead you to believe their dedication to their students would be less than yours?
     
  40. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    I wouldn't want a surgeon who was just passing through for a year or two until he could find the job he really wanted. I'd rather find a surgeon who is passionate in honing his skill to be the best surgeon he could be in the long-term...over more than 2 years. I don't think a surgeon could gain the skill he or she needs in 2 years, before changing professions, to be the best surgeon out there -- no matter how dedicated he or she was during those 2 years.

    As the original poster said, he has no intention of teaching for a living.

    I never questioned his dedication. I still don't question his dedication.

    I stand by what I said, and feel no further need to justify it. I'm not asking anyone to agree with me. The OP asked for responses, and I gave mine.
     
  41. smarkham01

    smarkham01 Companion

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    Yes, you did respond to him. I wasn't asking for justification, just clarification to help me determine the scope of your feeling.
     

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