Should I be a Paraprofessional or Substitute Teacher? (LONG POST)

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Dare2Teach, May 17, 2017.

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Should I be a paraprofessional or substitute teacher? (Read before answering)

  1. Paraprofessional

    75.0%
  2. Substitute Teacher

    25.0%
  1. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

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    May 17, 2017

    Hello, everyone! My name is Dare2Teach, and I am new here to the A to Z Teacher Stuff forum/website.

    I am creating this topic because I need some advice. Please be aware that this will be a LONG post, and will mostly consist of me venting. You have been warned.

    I am also not sure if this is the appropriate place to put this post in, so if it is not, please let me know.

    Anyway, here we go:

    I recently graduated college last December of 2016. When I started college back in the fall of 2013, I aspired to become a future educator, specifically in the Elementary School field. I temporally went through the Elementary Education program at my university, which consisted of four blocks. Each block, except for the last one, consisted of taking classes appropriate to the program, and doing part time student teaching (practicum) while taking those courses. The fourth, and last, block consisted of full time student teaching and a seminar course.

    I was really excited to be part of the Elementary Education program at my university, and while it got off to a rough start because of a not so pleasant practicum in the first block, by second block, things seemed to be going up, as I was enjoying my practicum that time around.

    However, I ended up having to withdraw from the program in the middle of the second block because of some personal issues. Since I was enjoying my practicum, I, of course, was devastated and frustrated. I ended up graduating with a different degree/major (B.S. in Health & Community Wellness) which I didn't really enjoy. I switched to that major so i wouldn't fall behind on graduation, and I wouldn't have an extended stay in college, which would make it more expensive, so to speak.

    Now that I have graduated from college, and I have spent a few months reflecting on my experience, I feel as if I am ready to go back into the education field. I still want to teach Elementary School, specifically the upper grades (3rd-5th grade).

    To get myself back into the education field, I was considering wanting to be a SUBSTITUTE TEACHER in my county before I decide if teaching really is for me, and I apply for a teaching program. I have a sister who also aspires to be an educator, and is currently a substitute teacher in order to get into a teaching program, which she successfully got into.

    However, my mother, on the other hand, thinks that I should be a PARAPROFESSIONAL in lieu of a substitute teacher. She wants me to be a paraprofessional because she thinks it's a better route, and I can get used to the feel of a classroom better than a substitute teacher. Also, the elementary school that I went to recently hired a new principal who worked at the high school I went to, which means that we can probably get me a paraprofessional position there because of the relationship between me and the new principal.

    My mother wants to advocate for me in getting a paraprofessional job, with me having little to no say in this.

    WARNING: VENTING AHEAD.

    I am really frustrated with this because my mother is not letting me advocate for myself. I am a 22 year old ADULT who needs to be making decisions for MYSELF, but also LEARNING from my OWN decisions should the decision be a bad one. Having my own mother hold my hand is both embarrassing and degrading for me.

    Also, since I have had experience in the elementary classroom as a student and as an aspiring teacher, and have done some careful observation, I can say firsthand that being a paraprofessional is NOTHING like being a teacher.

    A teacher:
    • works with a classroom FULL of students, the number of students varying depending on the school
    • writes and organizes LESSON PLANTS to teach the students certain material based on performance standards
    • Is the one IN CHARGE of a classroom
    A parapfoessional:
    • works with mainly A FEW students, and usually are the students who are under Special Education/Inclusion
    • mainly does duties that the teacher is supposed to do, but cannot because the teacher is trying to teach a classroom full of students (Duties such as grading work, paperwork, etc.)
    • is mainly an EXTRA SET OF HANDS, in other words, an ASSISTANT
    There is, of course, more to these positions than what I have described, but this is what I have mainly observed.

    I feel that it would be very degrading for me to be a paraprofessional because I have a COLLEGE DEGREE, which is not even required to be a paraprofessional. You do not have to have a college degree to be a substitute teacher, but at least you are IN CHARGE of the classroom, and not an assistant.

    Also, while you may not be doing any actual 'teaching' as a substitute teacher, if you leave a good impression on the schools your substitute teach at, you may get promoted to longer sub placements, which means you may actually get to teach.

    Another thing that frustrates me is that the elementary school that hired the new principal is only for grades Pre-K-3rd grade, so I am probably better off at the nearby middle school, which has grades 4th-6th.

    I apologize for this long post, but I am extremely frustrated, because I think I have set myself a good route to get back into the education field, and I want to fend for MYSELF by applying to be a substitute teacher. Being a paraprofessional, I think, will be very boring, as it shouldn't take long for me to get back into the feel of a classroom, and I really want to be standing in front of the classroom, and actually TEACH.

    Since this a website for teachers of all kinds, including paraprofessionals, I would just like some insight on which may be the better route. I would like to hear from both substitute teachers and paraprofessionals, but anyone is open to give me their opinion.

    Thank you in advance, and I look forward to hearing from all of you!

    -Dare2Teach
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 17, 2017

    Why are you giving your mother so much power? Why can't you make the decision for yourself? I might be confused about what's going on here, but I don't see how she can "advocate for" you without your consent unless you are a minor and/or have some serious special needs.
     
  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    May 17, 2017

    When I started teaching, most of the elementary teachers came from the paraprofessional pool. There were way more people wanting elementary positions than positions available, so almost all of the paras were certified or finishing up degrees in teaching. By being a para they got full insurance benefits, leave time, and visibility in the school where they wanted to work as a teacher.

    I chose to sub because I was secondary certified. That put my visibility at the high school and middle school where I was certified to teach. I did two long-term jobs for teachers with my certification. One was six weeks. Another was twelve weeks. I was hired at the school the following year. I did not get sick leave or insurance, but I was available to work every day and was called all but 5 days the entire school year.

    Go where you want. You don't have to stay forever with whatever choice you make.

    And don't think that being a paraprofessional is degrading. I have multiple degrees and many years of experience, but I'm not too good to do any job. If you need a job, you will do what you can find and be glad to have it.

    Your mother is doing what you allow her to do. My mom still gives me advice all the time, but once I moved out of the house at 17 to go to college, my decisions were mine to make, good or bad. Neither of my parents ever got mad when I didn't do what they said.
     
  5. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    May 17, 2017

    Full disclosure: I skimmed a few parts of it, but read the key parts...

    I think there's pros and cons to subbing vs. being a para.
    As a sub, you can increase your visibility to multiple locations (schools and districts), try a variety of styles out of classrooms, and gather plenty of ideas. The downside obviously is a lack of benefits (obviously).

    As a para, you'd increase your visibility in that one school, and have a chance to truly establish yourself there. You'd also possibly have benefits, and still get to see many ideas. It would somewhat limit your visibility beyond that school though, and you might not get to have as many opportunities to take on that full-on teaching role.
     
  6. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    May 17, 2017

    I personally never was a para, but I was a sub for a good 11 yrs. Many here, including me, will say that subbing is nothing like actual teaching as you've probably heard before. They each have their pros & cons. How about trying subbing for at least a year, then try being a para for another year or two after that? In the meantime, while doing those, apply for teaching jobs. How does your sister like subbing and what has she told you about her experiences?

    And the part about having a degree, but doing these kinds of jobs, well, you have to still crawl before you can walk. New graduates will have a degree, but may have to start off somehwere to get that hands-on experience, so I wouldn't care about that and can put my pride aside.

    Whatever you decide, good luck.
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I do have a bit of an issue with your attitude toward paraprofessionals--please don't consider paras as second-class citizens.

    That said, you are an adult and need to make adult decisions. If you have a hard time talking to your mom about your feelings, show her your post.
     
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  8. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

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    May 17, 2017

    Although I do apologize if I offended any paraprofessionals, please understand that I was NOT trying to say that a paraprofessional is a horrible position.

    I think that being a paraprofessional is a great profession for those who would rather work with small groups of students as opposed to a large group, those aspiring to work with students in special education/inclusion settings, etc.

    All I was saying was that I do not think being a paraprofessional is for me because of my college degree, and how I think I am more than just being an assistant. In other words, I think that I can do better than just being a paraprofessional.

    Again, I apologize if I was offending anybody; perhaps I should have worded what I said in the OP better so it wouldn't be taken out of context.

    -Dare2Teach
     
  9. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    May 17, 2017

    Be a teacher because you want to teach and are passionate about teaching. Don't go down the teacher route because you have a college degree and did some student teaching. Having a degree allows you to be licensed but doesn't make you a good teacher. Dont deliberately go in the opposite way that your mother wants you to go and don't be a teacher because your sister is going down that route. Your mother may be right about being a para or she may not. Have a really good think about your motivations for being a teacher. You can get as much satisfaction and make as much of a difference in being a para as a teacher.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    May 17, 2017

    I am a sub right not but I would 100% choose to be a para if I had the choice. Since I was applying to grad school programs that began in May, I couldn't apply for jobs as para since I was unsure of whether I would be here for the full year. I know subbing is good experience, but it is really stressful going into a different classroom everyday. And yes, you are "in charge" of the kids but most of it is managing behaviors which are much worse with a sub. I also have to me more strict than I would like to be since subs don't have the opportunity to form relationships with students. The kids that are older than 2nd grade know that you are not their regular teacher, don't know their names, etc. and and will try to take advantage of the situation. (Recently, I've noticed that even 1st grade classes will try to take advantage of you!) Students respect paras much more since they see them everyday and most students see paras as their other teachers. Yes, paras are often assigned to a few students but they also work with all students in the classroom as well. Subbing is really good experience for being "in charge" of a classroom but it would also be beneficial to see daily classroom activities and how a classroom teacher teaches lessons in my opinion.

    The other issue with subbing is that it is harder to form relationships with other staff. I'm an introvert which makes it extra hard. The teachers I have met were nothing but friendly but I still feel awkward eating in the lounge and always try to go back to the classroom when I can. As a para, it's easier to get to know other staff and make friends at school. As a sub, I usually stand alone during recess duty, etc.

    The great thing about subbing is the flexibility since you can take a day off when you want. If money is not an issue it can be nice. I think the experience of leading a class and managing behaviors will be helpful as I start student teaching. I'm so excited to be going to the same classroom everyday next year and having more consistency. I know people who have subbed for many, many years and I don't know how they do it! I definitely don't have the personality for it!
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
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  11. Kelster95

    Kelster95 Companion

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    May 17, 2017

    I know of several future teachers who worked as a Para while they decided if teaching was for them and completed the alt route program. They got to see teachers in action and the teachers they worked with gave them more responsibilities since they were working to become teachers.
     
  12. Sab

    Sab Companion

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    Subbing is nothing like being a teacher...today I subbed and I showed the same documentary like 4 times. And the pay is low and inconsistent...some areas you may be able to get more jobs than others but it depends. You might actually get more experience and money as a para. I also don't see how it would be degrading at all to be a para. But do what you want
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    The main point I wanted to make in my post was that YOU need to make the decisions about your future; it is not your mother's responsibility or right. If you are frustrated by her interference, you need to tell her that.

    I'm the mom of two young adults; my daughter (23) has had to make some tough decisions lately. She has lamented the fact that things were so much easier when she was younger and she didn't need to make the decisions. I told her that I'll listen to her talk things out and ask questions, but won't tell her what I think she should do. My kids are the most important thing in my life, but I won't make decisions for them.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  14. CherryOak

    CherryOak Companion

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    May 18, 2017

    I like subbing. It suits me and my situation right now. But, if I were in your shoes, I'd strongly consider the para. Full time with benefits means a lot.
     
  15. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    I think letting your parents decide your future is more degrading than being a paraprofessional. A college degree doesn't guarantee anything these days. Sometimes you have to get your foot in the door.
     
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  16. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Not always, but once you establish yourself, it often can be. 90% of the sub days that I had in my final year before getting this position were pretty much just like a normal day as a teacher (less the meetings and other related pieces) because of the trust the teachers had in me. Some of the times they'd even allow me to determine appropriate next steps for multi-day jobs!
     
  17. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    May 18, 2017

    Day-to-day subbing doesn't feel like teaching but it can lead to long-term subbing positions which are more like teaching than being a para, at least in most situations. I was an aide for 8 years and I loved it. I was more like a co-teacher in the classroom - that's just how we functioned. That said, when I started looking for teaching jobs, hiring panels didn't seem to care about that experience as much as they did the long-term subbing placements. Most of them just didn't seem to think of it as teaching experience. (My current job is the lone exception. I teach in a self-contained classroom with a classroom aide and my principal mentioned in passing one day that he liked that I'd been on the other side of that relationship.) So being a para might give you an idea if you like working in a school setting, but in my experience at least, subbing is a better foot in the door for teaching. Kind of depends on your area, I guess, though.
     
  18. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    What I did was subbed for a while (also had a LTS position) and when there were no job openings in my area I was a para for 6 months before getting offered a teaching position at that school. Try one option and if it doesn't work out try another.
     
  19. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    One of my friends took a parapro position and was pulled to sub in her building whenever one was needed since she was licensed (and was paid extra on the subbing days). So you could essentially do both. She found a teaching position the next year
     
  20. laoshijiejie

    laoshijiejie Rookie

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    Going from being an interim to subbing, I can tell you subbing is nothing like teaching. I felt more like I was babysitting, as the teachers left me videos and packets the kids could do independently.
    Being a para, you would get benefits, learn a lot from the teacher(s) you are placed with (maybe even taking on more responsibilities), get to build bonds with the students and staff at that school, and get to know the principal. I think it's silly that you think being a para is beneath you because you have a degree...
     
  21. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    It seems the poster's way of thinking has a lot to do with why her parents are "butting in" although sometimes it's just better for parents to let their children learn from their mistakes.
     
  22. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think that the question of being a sub versus a para depends on several factors including personality, goals, and the district. In some districts good subs rarely get hired because the district wants to keep them in the sub pool. This isn't true of my district and I've seen a number of good (or at least reliable) subs get hired on as regular classroom teachers. In some districts you can get totally pigeonholed as a para and never have an opportunity to move into the position of a regular classroom teacher.

    For me, I think I'd choose to be a para. The pay isn't usually great, but the hours are set and full-time and there are usually benefits. Plus I would like the opportunity to work closely with the same students on a regular basis and have the chance to develop my teaching skills, even just for small-group stuff. I would also have an opportunity to develop a long-term professional relationship with people who could write me an excellent letter of recommendation when the time comes to apply for classroom positions. I wouldn't prefer to be a sub because I would struggle with having a different classroom, different set of kids, and different procedures every day. I would also get antsy if I didn't have a job every day, and we all know that subbing isn't guaranteed in many districts. Having said all this, I'm sure that there are others who would take a different stance based on their own personalities and goals. There isn't necessarily a right answer here.
     
  23. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

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    May 21, 2017

    Hello, everyone. This is Dare2Teach.

    I just want to thank those of you who have responded to my post. I have been hearing a mixed bag of opinions, with some of you telling me to take the substitute teacher approach, while others are telling me to be a paraprofessional. I love hearing mixed opinions, and I appreciate everyone's opinions.

    After careful consideration, and reading over everyone's responses, I have decided to go with the paraprofessional route. I plan on taking the GACE Paraprofessional assessment (I am from Georgia) sometime soon, and if I pass, then I will apply to be a paraprofessional at an elementary school.

    I know that I am pretty much giving in and letting my mother take over for my possible teaching career, but after looking back on it, I feel as if she is just trying to help me. Mothers do know best, after all.

    I still, think, though, that being a paraprofessional will be nothing like being an educator. However, if I do end up in a paraprofessional position, then I will just to need the let the school know about my desire to becoming an educator, and maybe I can convince the school that I will potentially be working at to let me be more than just a paraprofessional.

    Thank you all, once again, for giving me your opinions. If you're still teaching, good luck on these final weeks of school, and if you're finished with the school year, have a happy summer!

    -Dare2Teach
     
  24. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    This is definitely true for the upper grades (especially 6th grade and above) since the teachers leave work students do independently. In early childhood classrooms, I do think subbing is involves a lot more teaching and I have been left lessons to teach. Granted, these are probably not the same lessons the teacher would have taught but it involves teaching and lots of interactions with the students. However, subbing early childhood (I'm thinking K-3) is very hard for this reason since you have to teach, quickly understand the procedures in the classroom, and keep everything organized for the day! I do like subbing here because the kids do see you as a teacher but it is the hardest in my opinion! If you want to become an early childhood teacher I may consider subbing if your district has enough jobs that you would be able to take early elementary jobs several days a week. Upper elementary jobs can also include some teaching but the teacher usually leaves activities the students can do alone. The hard part here is transitions which is also good to practice! If you are planning on teaching middle school and taking middle school jobs for teaching experience, I may choose to be an aide instead. There is very little teaching in subbing classes higher than 6th grade!
     
  25. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    May 24, 2017

    That's great Dare2Teach! Good luck w/ it all!
     
  26. renard

    renard Companion

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    May 31, 2017

    I've done all three.

    Being a teacher is more demanding of your time and mental stress 24/7.

    Being a paraprofessional is more physically demanding and stressful in the moment, particularly if you are working with severe behaviours. Once you walk out of the class, that's it - it's not your responsiblity (until the next day). Teachers don't get that.

    I prefer being a teacher because I just couldn't imagine being a paraprofessional forever. It was SO hard. My son has a 1:1 paraprofessional and I buy her copious amounts of liquor for each holiday/school year. She's worth her weight in gold.
     
  27. kellzy

    kellzy Comrade

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    Jun 1, 2017

    I graduated in 2009, a half a year after the 2008 crash, and teaching jobs were scarce. I couldn't get placed that first year out. I had to move home because of the money issue. I got a job as a substitute and a part time paraprofessional at the local school district. The rationale was that I would get a good reputation and then that would be the foot in the door. I got a really good reputation as a substitute teacher at several schools, and I became their go-to sub, as well as a good one at the school I was a para. As the months went on though, I realized the amount of nepotism going on in the district, and there was no way I was getting a full time teaching job there. I was offered a position as a temporary para in a district about an hour away. I took the gamble and did it. I schmoozed and got in the vice principal's good graces and he got me about 25 interviews around the district, which ultimately lead to my first and current job.

    So my advice: whatever you choose to do, do it well, get a good reputation and you'll get a job.

    PS: Or you could just move to Utah where we are several thousand teachers short and a zoo animal could probably get a job as a teacher right now.
     
  28. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Disagree with this. Subbing is an indicator of your ability to be a teacher. Obviously, there are days like you mention. However, I came to subbing with zero teaching ability or inclination. Just a couple days ago, I had a nice young collegiate woman subbing in my class. She will probably be a teacher after she graduates.... However, I happened to be in there when she started talking to my class (as I was about to leave), and her ability to address the class seemed awkward and uncomfortable. You can put an experienced para- in the same position, and they will also struggle with just that part of teaching (addressing a class). Granted, this is only one part of being a teacher, but it is a key part. Subs don't get any experience with all the other stuff (planning, dealing with parents, staff), but I'm confident in saying that I was ready to be a teacher 10 years ago, even though I only just got hired a few years back. This was only due to my subbing experience.
     
  29. MisterS

    MisterS New Member

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    I'm kind of in the same boat. I'm just finishing my first year as a per diem sub. Earned enough college credits (64) to qualify for the pool in two districts, despite not (yet) earning a degree. I've absolutely loved my time in the classroom, even through the tougher days. The problem comes when there aren't enough assignments to accept and I don't earn any money for those days off.

    Several teachers and administrators at schools I've worked at this year have mentioned the paraprofessional route, given my lack of degree/licensure, since it's full-time. I'm up in the air on it, but it's been mentioned enough as an option that I've just recently put in for a para position after letting several other opportunities go by the boards.
     
  30. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Well, as we can see there are pros and cons either way. I would say do what you want to do. I have taught 39 years. At the age of 30 I quit. After a few months I started subbing. I quickly realized I was supposed to be a teacher and got the best job of my life in my previous district. Some schools allow paras to sub. I have known paras that were better in front of a class than some teachers. Ive known paras that went to college while working to become teachers. It got them a job. IF you are a good sub and reliable some principals will certainly give you a look. Whatever you do I hope it works out for you.
     
  31. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 11, 2017

    I suspect that OP is living with mom, and mom is paying a lot of the bills, not to mention the undergrad degree. That is how mom was "given" the power most likely. Mom is thinking contract, benefits, steady salary, which are valid points if OP is living at home and mom is picking up the tab. If the OP is providing for herself, then I say it is her choice, but OP is going to have to figure out how to pay for and finish the missing practicum, from what I have read. It won't matter if she is a para or sub if she can't earn her certificate.
     
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