short story unit

Discussion in 'High School' started by inlovewithwords, Jul 18, 2007.

  1. inlovewithwords

    inlovewithwords Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    Does anyone have lesson plans for a short story unit that have worked? I'm stuck. Teaching the elements of short stories with plot and everything sounds so boring. I want to make it interesting. This is for 9th graders who are struggling readers and writers.
     
  2.  
  3. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2007

    I guess I missed this post the past couple of days.
    With my 8th graders, I teach them the vocab (usually the boring way ;)), then we read and discuss a few stories together. Next, I group them (3 or 4 per group), and assign each group a different story. Each member of the group is responsible for reading the story, but I do give them one class period (I have 50 min. periods) to read. Most will get it done. Some of them will ask to read it out loud with their groups. I'm more than okay with that! The next day, I give each group 6 construction-paper triangles (good sized) and a large sheet of butcher paper or a posterboard. On the triangles, they write their analysis of 1) plot, 2) characters (protagonist, antagonist, minor), 3) conflict(s)/resolution(s), 4) the author's use of language, 5) theme, and 6) personal connections. The triangles are then glued to the butcher paper with the bases facing out to form a hexagon. The groups present their stories to the class.
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,070
    Likes Received:
    1,886

    Jul 21, 2007

    Greeat idea ValinFW--I'm adding this idea to my files!
     
  5. nsatterfield

    nsatterfield Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2007

    I love that idea ValinFW!

    I usually have them make a story map for a couple of stories throughout the year. They draw a picture/scene from the story and incorporate the plot, theme, purpose, characters, etc into the drawing. They usually love drawing and want to do that assignment for every story rather than just diagramming the info on a worksheet!
     
  6. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2007

    Another idea, that can be used with longer short stories or with novels:
    Turn a sheet of manila paper (regular paper can be used, too) sideways. In the center, at the top, write the title and author. In the very center, write a theme statement. Below the theme statement, draw a symbol to represent a major idea from the story. Across the bottom, draw 2 of the conflicts and explain how they were resolved. Down the left side, draw the protagonist and antagonist and give three reason why the student chose those characters as the pro/ant. Down the right side, draw 3 of the settings.
     
  7. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2007

    I used this idea with 6th graders, but it can be adapted for any grade, especially struggling readers:

    I created what I called a "plot landscape."

    After reading a short story, the students are to create one (after it is modeled). Any aspect of short stories can be addressed in the landscape, so long as you have gone over it.

    Basically, my example usually is a green foreground (grass), with mountains in the back. The building peaks of mountains are each labeled with one sentence each (exposition, conflict, rising action, climax/turning point, resolution). The sentence is written/pasted above the peak. Elsewhere on the landscape, an animal or peron is drawn, and the names of the main characters are written inside it.

    From here, you can be creative.

    Foreshadowing = I drew a tree and wrote the event that had been foreshadowed in the tree. Then, I drew a shadow to the left of the tree and wrote the sentence/event that did the foreshadowing.

    Cause-and-effect = I drew two bushes/plants, one with the cause, one with the effect, and connected them with a path-/walkway.

    Theme = add another piece to the landscape and write the theme in it

    Setting = draw a house or other appropriate item and write the subject.

    The short story and author's name go at the top of the page.

    As you're reading, graphic organizers in the shape of the topics you're covering can be used (pass out diagrams of trees and shadows, connected bushes, etc.).

    With practice (and building onto ideas one at a time), this is a very creative and fun project. Some kids will change the natural landscape to a cityscape, or choose a different season, or place it underwater, or whatever else--either to suit their interests, or to better reflect the setting/plot.

    This project provided an example from me so they could fashion their landscape after mine, but also allowed for personal creativity if they so chose. Some students used pictures or clip art from the computer, some were very adept at drawing, others use different colored construction paper. It was very fun!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 219 (members: 1, guests: 199, robots: 19)
test