Share your painting tips!

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by karebear76, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Nov 16, 2012

    My home renovation is moving right along :D We are up to the wall painting stage in preparation for the new hardwood floor to be installed.

    I've decided on 2 shades of light brown. The darker one will be one wall that unites the two spaces (combined LR and DR), with the lighter shade for the remaining walls.

    So what's your favorite tips or tricks? I usually get impatient and cut corners on taping or cutting in at the ceiling. I am determined to do it right this time :)

    Any favorite brands of tools? I'll be shopping tomorrow so I can get started soon.
     
  2.  
  3. AZMrs.S

    AZMrs.S Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 16, 2012

    No tips. But we're painting our new house next week so I'm excited to read everyone's tips!
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,115

    Nov 16, 2012

    Frog tape
    Behr paint...primer and color in one
    Disposable paint pan liners
    A 5 in 1 tool
     
  5. Securis

    Securis Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 16, 2012

    When painting doors and doorjambs, you should not close them until the paint cures. Which could take several days (2-3). I'm not talking about drying. Curing is something that happens after paint has dried and it can still stick to itself and ruin a good job. However, say you want to close your doors prior to paint curing, rub bar soap against places where the newly painted door and doorjamb will touch. The soap will provide a barrier and it will not stick to itself.

    Same thing with windows and places where new paint may touch other newly painted surfaces.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,115

    Nov 16, 2012

    I take doors off their hinges for painting.
     
  7. Securis

    Securis Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 16, 2012

    Keep a damp rag to hand for 'accidents' and places where you 'oops!' while cutting in.


    @Czacza - So do I but even then, the paint can stick to itself if it hasn't cured long enough.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,115

    Nov 16, 2012

    Yes, I know! In addition to painting around my house, I also am a bit of a dabbler in oil painting...I can be very patient in waiting for the cure!:D
     
  9. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Nov 16, 2012

    Thanks! It's a completely redone room, so I won't be painting doors or trim. That will all be new stuff too.

    I'll be shopping at Lowe's and Walmart. WM didn't have my color choices, even in their high end stuff, so Lowe's will get my money (Valspar).
     
  10. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,240
    Likes Received:
    2,151

    Nov 16, 2012

    Hydrate, play music, don't paint hungry, and get fresh air often....
     
  11. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Nov 17, 2012

    Painting has officially begun!! I painted one wall, so now I'm waiting for it to dry so I can switch colors. I might start taping the opposing walls after my break. I should have taped the whole room but it's killer on my back. I've got 3 kiddos dancing around underfoot as well.
     
  12. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 17, 2012

    Agree with what czacza said. Can't add anything extra.

    Hubby and I decided to paint our house (now renting to my parents) all on our own. The whole house. Wow, that was a lot of work. And since we're perfectionist, it had to be done right. We spent MONTHS on just the prepping (also included carpet removal, bathroom destruction and rebuild, etc). We bought the house in April and the painting was started in August or September. We didn't even move in until it was all completed. I think one of the hardest parts though was picking the right paint color. We ended up with a soft yellow for the living room and kitchen, blue for the bathroom, and orange for the guest. The bedrooms were a grey/white color.

    Good luck. I know we were HAPPY when we finally got it all done.
     
  13. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Nov 17, 2012

    This has been a huge project for hubby. He's gladly handing over the painting to me :lol:

    He started last week of July with a complete demolition down to the studs, and then replacing everything. I ordered the new flooring today, so in a few weeks we'll have bamboo floors installed. Then we will be getting new furniture as well. I'm getting so excited about it now.
     
  14. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 18, 2012

    Hope this is not considered hijacking, but I'm wondering if anyone can help me figure out whether it really pays to do my own painting or hire it out... hiring someone is really expensive and we are quite strapped for money with all the other moving expenses, but on the other hand doing it ourselves, is that a whole lot of work? Or can we just open the windows wide and start rolling paint onto the walls? I am completely clueless. Indoor housepainting for dummies, anyone? I'm afraid to suffocate painting the insides of closets... do I need to worry if the current layer is cracking or peeling? It's a rental for just a few years so I don't need it to be perfect and last forever, I just want to live in a decent-looking place...
     
  15. Securis

    Securis Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 18, 2012

    To paint a room.

    1) remove or cover possessions you wish to keep clear of paint. Move what stays to center of the room.

    2) clean the walls with mild soapy water if they look excessively dirty or oily. Doesn't hurt but isn't absolutely necessary. Cracking and peeling paint should be scraped off otherwise it'll loosen up while you are painting and come off on your roller while you're painting.

    3) if walls are stained or dark colored - paint with stain blocking primer. Windows wide and use a fan to quicken drying. Half day task. They make water-based primer/stain blockers that work well.

    4)Tape baseboards, doorjambs, windows jambs, and ceiling. Half day task.

    5)Cut in all corners, baseboards, jambs, and ceiling. Half day.

    6)roll on paint. let dry. 2nd coat, let dry. 3rd coat. most of a day if you have no other rooms or have a lot of furniture to move about.

    7) check the cut in areas to make sure you have no 'holidays' (poor coverage)

    **Fumes from latex paints aren't terrible but different people have different tolerances. Oil-based paints will get you high and cause brain damage so you should use lots of ventilation. My advice, go latex all the way.

    ***Flat finish paints are usually cheapest and easiest to use but get dirty easiest and are difficult to clean. Semi-gloss and gloss are easiest to keep clean. Satins are the best finishes if you do them right which takes more technical skill especially darker colors.

    ****my time frames are completely approximate and dependent on efficiency and the reality of your situation and the number of rooms you intend to do at one go.
     
  16. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 18, 2012

    Thanks for the briefing!
    What do you mean by #5, "cut in"?
    What does it mean to "do them right" for satin finishes?
     
  17. Securis

    Securis Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 28, 2012

    'Cutting in' means to paint your wall corners and edges near trim, doors, and windows where your new paint meets areas that you do not want to paint. Essentially, you paint these areas first so that you can whizz through painting the big areas with a roller.

    Satin paints have a texture to them and one stroke with the roller or brush that is not the same direction as the next stroke, especially in darker colors, shows badly and doesn't look uniform. I learned the hard way using a Princess Plum satin paint from Sherwin Williams. 7 coats and I finally got it all rolled the same direction.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Sabina pokhrel,
  2. drwpress
Total: 196 (members: 2, guests: 170, robots: 24)
test