share a classroom?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by HeatherY, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Sep 8, 2009

    I am the one of two candidates for a 3rd grade position and I am supposed to hear yes or no by Friday. I went on a second interview today and got to ask some questions. My last question was: Can I see the classroom I would be working in? The VP tells me that it isn't set up yet (and she didn't have time). She said that they have "large rooms" so they split them in half and two classes work in the same room. Does anyone else do this? I was pumped for this job, but that just threw me for a loop! If offered the job then I can go check it out and they will give me a tour of the school. Does this sound crazy to anyone else? I would have to worry about disturbing another class that might be on a different schedule. Also, probably some resentment for making someone give up half their room! Anyone else dealing with this or heard of this?
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Sep 8, 2009

    Heather,
    It is incredibly common in many schools. I had to share a room one year, and absolutely hated it -- however, whoever is the newest teacher has to do it, and once you've been there for a year or two, you can often move to another room. Everything you are thinking is true -- it is a pain, it is confusing, and it is annoying. But if it is between that and not having a job, I'd take the annoyance and do it anyway. If you get a good colleague to share the room with, it isn't that bad. (If you don't, it can be a nightmare, but you will survive it.)

    I taught at one school once where every grade level shared one big "open" room -- so there are 4 fifth grade classes in one large room with a set of restrooms -- and I just hated it. I am ADHD, and the in-and-out of 3 other teachers and classes was so overwhelming. But I had to do what I had to do.
     
  4. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Sep 8, 2009

    I had to share a space before and although I hated it, I knew it would lead to bigger and better opportunities at the school if I accepted the job and did a great job. It was worthwhile because I got my own room the very next year.
     
  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 9, 2009

    I'll give you a positive response. There are ways to organize your part of the room so you have less contact with the other class and you can organize your schedule so you have some quiet time to teach. We can talk more WHEN you get the job!
     
  6. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Sep 10, 2009

    I got the job! Heading over there now to sign a contract and see the room!
     
  7. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Congrats again!

    The style is called open concept and from what I've been told, it was a popular design for schools in the late 80s and early 90s. I have a friend who teaches at a school built with this style. She said that they have large partitions for walls, that can fold up if needed. She also said that they have to of course, watch their noise level when other classes are testing. Eek. I think teachers that teach in open rooms get use to it and so do the students.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 10, 2009

    At the elementary school my children attended, one of the large (former Industrial Arts) rooms housed 2 grade 1 classes. Instead of tiptoeing around each other or trying to divide the space, the teachers and students worked together as one large class. One teacher planned all of the language and social studies lessons, the other planned the math and science. Group lessons, read alouds, etc were done with both groups together; with 2 teachers in the room one could provide the instruction while the other acted as "crowd control". During independent work, centres and work stations, both classes rotated through activities with each teacher taking turns pulling guided reading groups. It sounds chaotic, but it worked exceptionally well; the 2 teachers worked together for over 10 years.
     
  9. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Okay, I have my own closed off room. Mis-communication about where to put me I guess.

    I love the idea of one huge class! If you could work it out, it would be awesome!
     
  10. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Congratulations to you. I hope you have a great year.
     
  11. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 10, 2009

    As a hard-of-hearing person I so object to these open concept ideas. You just never know if kids can really hear well enough for that. Plus it is too distracting for some kids. I just don't get why schools are designed in this way.
     
  12. historygrrl

    historygrrl Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2009

    I went to open-concept schools from K to 6th grade in the 70s and 80s. I didn't even know other schools had separate classrooms until I moved to a different district!
    As a student, it didn't bother me. As a teacher now, I don't know how my teachers did it back then.
     

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