Sex Education topics

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, Nov 12, 2014.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2014

    Which of these topics should be covered in sex ed? At what grade level is it appropriate to address these topics?

    • How to deal with cyberbullying of a sexual nature
    • ************ (I guess this got edited by our software here. The word starts with "mast" and ends in "urbation".)
    • How to make responsible sexual choices
    • Dangers of sexting (texting sexual language)
    • Good touch, bad touch, secret touch
    • Sexual orientation
    • Gender identity
    • Gender stereotypes
    • Resources for obtaining effective and safe methods of contraception
    • Negotiating (refers to skills needed to reach an understanding or resolve points of difference within relationships)
    • Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) screening and treatment
    • Statutory rape
    • Age of consent
    • Dangers of electronic transmission of sexual images
     
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  3. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Nov 12, 2014

    Here in California, Health Education is taught in grades K-12.

    Sex ed, however, is specifically introduced in grades 5 & 7. In grade 5, a signed permission slip must be on file before it is taught. Also, parents have the option to view the curriculum before their child sees it.

    http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/healthstandmar08.pdf
     
  4. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Nov 12, 2014

    I taught sex ed as part of our Grade 7 Health curriculum and I taught all of those topics with the exception of good touch, bad touch. I assume that that was covered previously. I also touched on changes that happened in puberty and menstruation.

    Some of the topics fell not under the sex ed unit, but other units. Sexting, cyberbullying of a sexual nature and sexual images was touched on through a cyber safety unit and negotiating was touched on in a unit designed to talk about all types of relationships, not just romantic or sexual ones.

    I think it's super important to teach kids about sexual health and the sooner the better. Obviously some topics are better suited for different ages (I don't see a point in talking about age of consent, for example, to elementary aged children) and we have to be sure that we're approaching it using age appropriate language, but I think that all of the topics you mentioned should be introduced by junior high.
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2014

    I don't have time to look these all up right now--have close to 20 kids in for lunch time "study hall" (aka, "My work for this afternoon isn't done--help!"), but here are the ones I know off-hand:
    - responsible choices--grade 7 and up (abstinence is addressed specifically in grade 7)
    - contraception--grades 8 and up
    - STD's--grade 8 and up
    - "---urbation" isn't addressed specifically in the curriculum, unless it's in grade 5 or 6
    - gender stereotypes is often addressed through media literacy--I touched on it last year in grade 7

    I'll definitely look into the others after school; you have me curious.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I feel that the introduction to most of these topics in MS should be a foundation, allowing better and more age appropriate discussions as the student ages and is faced with more peer pressure on these subjects. As a HS biology teacher some of these subjects come up in class, and I am always honest with my students without offering more information than needed. I don't think that Number 2 on the list is going to get much class time anywhere before college, except maybe in a HS sex ed. class. I do cover STD's, the process of contraception that is biology based, the research that is behind our understanding of sexual orientation and gender identity. If a student asks a serious question, I will give a serious answer or find someone who can help.
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Nov 12, 2014

    • How to deal with cyberbullying of a sexual nature All ages. You don't have to explicitly tell them what it means, but all students should know what to do if they are being harassed.
    • (I guess this got edited by our software here. The word starts with "mast" and ends in "urbation".) Probably not until Middle or High School
    • How to make responsible sexual choices Middle school
    • Dangers of sexting (texting sexual language) High School
    • Good touch, bad touch, secret touch Elementary School
    • Sexual orientation Middle School
    • Gender identity Middle School
    • Gender stereotypes I would love for this to be addressed in Elementary
    • Resources for obtaining effective and safe methods of contraception Middle or High School depending on the population
    • Negotiating (refers to skills needed to reach an understanding or resolve points of difference within relationships) If this includes anything from friendship to dating, I think it could be adapted for all ages
    • Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) screening and treatment High School?
    • Statutory rape Middle School
    • Age of consent Middle or High depending on population?
    • Dangers of electronic transmission of sexual images Middle School definitely, but it can be adapted to the dangers of electronic transmission of images of any type that you don't want your grandma to see
    ]
     
  8. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Nov 12, 2014

    I definitely agree with most of what you said but I would start talking about sexting in MS. Many of our girls are sending racy messages, "propositioning"/promising boys sexual favors and sending inappropriate pics.
     
  9. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    I definitely think all of them should be covered at some point. I agree with Peregrin, except for what Go Blue already said.
     
  10. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Nov 12, 2014

    What are parents covering?
     
  11. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Nov 12, 2014

    Point taken. It's not a huge issue here for our middle schoolers so I said high school but I can definitely see it becoming a problem for certain communities and populations.
     
  12. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Unfortunately, often, nothing. That's the point.
     
  13. Janedo5513

    Janedo5513 Rookie

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    Nov 12, 2014

    I think if you are going to talk about statutory rape in Middle School then you can also talk about STI/ STD. Since I teach in MS, I would gear it more towards the 8th graders and start discussing the different types of STI's/ STD's and then once the students are in High School (9th grade) dive more into the subject. You can have a class break into groups and research what STI/STD has a drug resistant strain vs. what methods have been effective besides abstinence of said STI/STD.
     
  14. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Nov 13, 2014

    I remember in 5th grade we got the basic information of how our bodies worked. In 9th grade, we went more into the STD/pregnancy/etc stuff of sex.

    I have already had the talk with my 10 year old daughter. We didn't get into everything, but it was more of a general overview. As things come up, we discuss it.
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Teachers would have less to teach if parents would be open and honestly answer the hard questions. Some don't know the answer, though, some have misinformation, some are uncomfortable and try to squirm out of the tough questions, and some simply feel that the schools are supposed to take care of this for them. I have a grown son, and the one rule was that no question was off limits, and I would answer honestly. If the answer was "I don't know" then I would find the answer. That's why I'm the mom, and I wanted to make sure that the answers were correct, not hogwash. I still answer questions honestly, because otherwise students and children learn that you lie. I don't know how to come back from that, so I stay with what works.
     
  16. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Nov 13, 2014


    This is the type of relationship I want my daughter and I to have. One that is open and honest and that she knows that she can ask me any question out there and that I will answer it or find out the answer.
     
  17. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Nov 13, 2014

    We have specific curriculum requirements (standards) in Physical and Health Education that address many of the topics in the initial post. Whether or not parents teach it, we need to as well.
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Nov 13, 2014

    I do understand, and I applaud the work. In my circle of friends with kids the same age as my son, I was shocked at how many assumed that their kids would learn everything they needed to know about sex education at school. They didn't want the embarrassment of broaching the subject with their sons, and they were afraid to alienate their daughters, who they were often at odds with. I don't teach sex ed, but as a biology teacher I will answer factually when the question deals with questions about the facts of life that fall in my domain. I have broached STD's in microbiology, HIV in infectious diseases, and about how hormonal contraceptives work when dealing with the endocrine system. When I first started at the HS, I was unsure, but my supervisor said don't lead, and don't moralize - staying with the facts keeps me within my realm. All I can say is that I hope she was right!

    As for my son, I believe that there were times when he didn't expect the answers he received, but in the long run, I trust that he has the facts that will help him to make wise choices. Some subjects were discussed on varied levels at different ages, of course. Parents can do more.
     

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