Setting up a Reader's Workshop

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by MrsCAD, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. MrsCAD

    MrsCAD Companion

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    Jul 19, 2009

    Can someone tell me the best way to set up a reading workshop and give me examples of how to use it in a 45 min class period?
     
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  3. MiddleGradesLA

    MiddleGradesLA Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2009

    I have been going crazy trying to figure out how to set up Reading Workshop this year. I used Writing Workshop last year, and it was very successful, so you'd thing I'd be able to pull off R W/S with no sweat. But I find that the two workshops are two very different things.

    I found the book The Cafe Book by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser. They're the ladies who created the Daily 5. At first, I thought this approach might be too babyish for my 6th graders, but the more I read and the more I saw the issues their students were sturggling, the more I saw that my students struggle with the same stuff (maybe on a larger scale). They focus on teaching students strategies to improve comprehension, accuracy, fluency, and expanding vocabulary. It's the R W/S format with mini-lesson, independent work with student conferences, and share time.
    Take a look through it. You can find it on the Stenhouse Publishing website (they allow you to browse through the entire book for free since it's new). I really like that they give you everything you need to get started.
    You can also read Notebook Connections by Aimee Buckner for free on the website. She has an awesome book out about the Writer's Notebook and strategies and techniques for its use (Notebook Know-How) that I LOVE. Her new book,Notebook Connections, is all about the Reader's Notebook. Since it's free to look through, it's worth a shot.

    Good luck!
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 20, 2009

    I'm not understanding what you need to know about RW- what do you know about this philosophy? Do you have a well-stocked class library? You could do reading workshop in a 45 minute block as long as your mini lessons were concise and to the point...You'd want to maximize the independent reading time- maybe kids could do the 'share' part the next day?
     
  5. rachaelski

    rachaelski Habitué

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    Jul 20, 2009

    I have 41 minutes periods and I am teaching reading and writing. I am with you on how to figure out how to do the workshop approach in the classroom.

    I am making my homework truly an extension of my classroom this year. A bell ringer activity will be a 10 minute freewrite (I write a one word "topic" on the board, and the students write everything and anything they can think of). The kids will use that freewrite to pick something to make their weekly writing project. It will be their responsibility to get through all the steps of the writing process by the next week. They will work in class and at home on the project.

    For reading, I am doing a similar thing, the students will have an independent reading book and a literature circle book. They will have 1 or 2 days a week to read independently while I conference and then one day when they meet in their literature circles. Part of their homework is to read 20 minutes a day.

    I will do very short mini-lessons for writing and reading (writing on M/W, Reading on T/R) with assessments on Friday.
     

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