Sensory Integration Disorder

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by uprekmom, Feb 11, 2008.

  1. uprekmom

    uprekmom Rookie

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    Feb 11, 2008

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  3. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Feb 11, 2008

    I have had students with an official diagnosis of SID as well as other students who have sensory difficulties. It depends on what type of sensory issues your child has to determine appropriate accommodations, modifications, etc.

    Some things I can think of that are pretty generic sensory solutions are:

    noise canceling headphones for overwhelming situations (assemblies, gym class, classroom events that get noisy, etc.)

    sensory breaks scheduled at certain times in the day (younger ages: play doh, rice table, water table, sandbox, squishey balls, etc. -- older ages: pushing a cart, wearing a weighted vest or backpack, cooking activities, etc.)

    weighted vests, or proprioceptive input vests (they look like wet suits), deep pressure vests

    sitting on a therapy ball at desk

    carpet square to determine physical boundaries at circle time or carpet time

    strip of velcro on desk to get random sensory input during long sitting periods

    fidget toys to hold while at desk (squish balls, fuzzy stuffed animal, google "fidget toys")

    More details would allow me to provide more specific ideas.
    The children that I have served that have SID have also had autism. So, it is hard for me to answer you specifically. But, they are usually able to function in the environment with their peers. (With the occasional calm down, quiet corner).
     
  4. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Feb 12, 2008

    I've worked with kids with SI in various situations. Teachersk lists a lot of the interventions kids tend to use. The best thing for students with SI, if they are able, is to teach them coping skills that they can learn to monitor their own needs, and keep the appropriate interventions (things like mentioned above, and possibly others) available and accessible to them. It will take time and troubleshooting, and patience on the part of you and the teachers, but it's very doable. Once you, your son, and his teachers have been able to pinpoint what kinds of things work for him, and get a plan of how to make them available to him, it will get easier. Most of the modifications are environmental.
     
  5. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2008

    I have DSI. You can PM me if you have any specific questions or concerns. Are you familiar with the disorder itself? I can send you and link you to a lot of easy-reading information.

    You haven't written much about your son, so I can't give you much right now. DSI can be mild, severe, or anywhere in between.

    The good news for you is that the condition is very treatable. Again, it depends on the child, but often with treatment the dysfunction can all but disappear. Kids with DSI are normal and can learn to function well. I think I'm quite OK :)

    I think the most important thing is to develop a sensory diet for your son. This means making sure he gets the right amounts of stimulation at different times. Getting into the groove takes time and maintaining the diet requires a lot of involvement on your part, but eventually he will probably develop enough self-awareness to keep himself going. In order to do this effectively, besides for following the advice of your OT, it's important for you to have an understanding of what's going on in your child. Learn as much as you can and keep observing your son to see how he fits in to what you're learning.

    Please pick up a copy of The Out of Sync Child by Carol Kranowitz. It is a great book, very readable, and very helpful. I've done a lot of research and it's the best book I've found for parents (because of its practical perspective) and people just beginning to learn about DSI (because of its easy style).
     
  6. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2008

    How old is the kid?
     
  7. uprekmom

    uprekmom Rookie

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    Feb 13, 2008

    Hello All:

    I hope I'm not rambling to much, but I didn't want you to think, that I didn't appreciated your comments. I have been sick and was in ER for chest pains. Not sure what the problem is, the doctor thinks I had some type of mild stroke, so I'm trying to play catch up with work. I'm still waiting on results from tests, but am back at work and feeling alot better.

    Anyway, my son is 5 and in Kindergarten and is considered low-normal for IQ. She stated that he has difficulties in vocubulary, verbal reasonings and conceptionalation. He has great visuals learning, but not non-verbal. (Looking at a picture of a 3D puzzle and copying it with an actual puzzle)

    I noticed that although he might have a learning disability, I believe some of it is my fault. Yes, teachers..I'm admitting as a parent, I haven't done enough.

    When we see things outside, I was more into getting him to learn what they were. Not comparing, which is faster, car or bus. When I read to him, I don't ask him what was his favorite part, who is his favorite character..what is the story about...Get it..

    So now in conjuction with her, I'm going to start working with him.
     
  8. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2008

    It's great that he's only five; even if you feel that you've contributed to the setback, all that means is that you can help turn it around. Five is young enough that he can catch up to his peers without much damage, if any. Just make sure to keep up with the therapy, because the therapists' influence can only extend so far without your consistent support.

    I'm here for you if there's anything you want to discuss after the dust settles.
     
  9. kidatheart

    kidatheart Habitué

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    Feb 14, 2008

    There is a child in my son's class that has a sensory disorder, not sure the exact dianosis - I was told that she has difficulty knowing where her extremeties are/what they are doing, but she uses a gel seat (the nubby kind) and has bands on the legs of her chair. She also uses a slant board with a clip on it so she can self stimulate with one hand and still do the work...
     
  10. Kippers

    Kippers Companion

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    Feb 21, 2008

    Hey there

    I'm a mom of a kid with sensory integration disorder. It was pretty severe at first and we're doing a whole lot better now. She's only seven.

    Please don't beat yourself up! I heartily agree with the Out of Sync Child recommendation. I also strongly suggest you find an occupational therapist who specializes in working with kids with this condition. The key here is to help your child learn to regulate sensory experiences, and for your sanity, to learn to recognize his triggers.

    Putting shoes on used to be a ridiculously big battle for us. Now we're okay. My girls still wear only soft clothing- knit dresses and soft Gymboree leggings- they can't tolerate denim. (I have twins, the other non-special needs daughter is suddenly eating her clothes in first grade, so we went back to the OT).

    We've learned to navigate between what works (lots of fresh air, swinging, outdoor play, massage, external noise-free environments at home) and avoid what doesn't (crowds, malls, bright flashing lights, loud noises, cross-conversations, rock music).

    The big resource I still want to provide for my daughter (after I finally land a job as a spec. ed teacher!) is therapeutic horseback riding.

    My daughter has a very hard time navigating herself in space, walking on trails is a huge challenge, especially if the ground is patchy with shade or uneven. As part of her disorder, she loses track of where she is and loses all confidence in herself to navigate and panics.

    Water is very soothing, but learning to swim was a real challenge. What finally worked was a patient one to one coach who (with my permission) physically moved her arms and legs for her, so she could experience the motions of swimming- she could not comprehend following an example and transfer it to her own movements.

    There are lots of movement exercises, brushing and massaging techniques, real relaxation techniques, and motor skills an OT can help you with. My DD has multiple issues, but the sensory issues really got in the way of her academic success since she is sooooo distracted by noise, lights, colors, etc.

    Does this help? I've been where you are right now. Don't beat yourself up. I hope you feel better very soon.

    Both DD's are in first grade now and with lots of support, my special needs DD is approaching grade level. We still have issues with writing, but I'm attempting to approach it with tactile paper, felt pens, etc. Different kinds of kids need different kinds of supports.

    Good luck!
     
  11. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Feb 22, 2008

  12. uprekmom

    uprekmom Rookie

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    Apr 22, 2008

    Hello All:

    Just wanted to give you an update from the Board of Ed. They recommended Speech therapy and Counseling. This weekend I received 2 packets in the mail with therapists and now I have the fun part of going through them and making phone calls to find out if they're taking new patients, their schedules, etc.

    Since he's in private school, I have to go find him on my own. I'm hoping we can do these sessions during the summer, since I haven't found a summer camp yet.

    Thanks for all your help.
     
  13. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Apr 22, 2008

    Good luck with the therapists. It can be hard to find someone to work with private school kids... but worth it.
     

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