Sending kids to nurse

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by cheeryteacher, Jul 13, 2008.

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  1. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    When do you send your kids to the nurse? I think I erred on the side of caution, but I'm sure that they were faking some of the time. What are your guidelines. I was thinking:
    -not for a headache (we know she can't do anything but have them lie down, they can put their head down in class.)
    -not for a pre-existing condition. (kid complains about how bad his hand hurts because he punched a wall last night. What would you do?:unsure:)
    -not for a bandaid (I can keep those in class)
    -basically, unless you are bleeding or obviously sick you don't go.

    What do you do with the kid that has to go to the nurse once or twice a week?
     
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  3. dbelmo

    dbelmo Rookie

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    I send them no matter what, just like if they say they need to go to the bathroom I do sent them too. I ask that they not go during instruction to wait until work time. However with the rise of asthma, diabetes, and other chronic ailments I am going to subject the other students to see a child in distress.

    If the child is frequent flyer, I feel that the nurse should be responsible or savy enough to discourage the child from returning all the time.

    Just my point of view.

    dbelmo
     
  4. AbbyR

    AbbyR Rookie

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    I think I had a room full of hypochondriacs last year. They hurt ALL the time. The tiniest little mosquito bite or pin prick was a major event and nothing would do but they make a trip to the nurse. Good idea about keeping band aids in the room. That might help some. I started to wonder if they got any attention at all at home, and I know that some parents in the room thought we were running a clinic for minor childhood ailments.

    Having ranted about it, I do try to err on the side of safety by sending the child if he or she asks more than once - or the first time if he is really sick. And then there were the times I sent the child without a request because he was obviously too sick to be in school and Mom sent him anyway.
     
  5. GD2BQN

    GD2BQN Comrade

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    Ditto with you cheeryteacher. They always get sent back to me with no response or remedy so if there's no blood/vomit involved I take care of it.
     
  6. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Thanks for the replies. Dbelmo, we get a list of all of the kids in our classes with any sort of medical condition, so I would know to watch out for those kids and send them if need be.

    I don't want to be mean about it, but I feel like I need some guidelines. Especially because I team teach with two other teachers. One day they ask during my class, then tomorrow it's during Mrs. D's class, the next day it's in Mr. R's class. Our nurse is really nice and will see them, and she will notify the teachers if it happens too frequently. But we also have a school of almost 1,200 kids and one nurse, so I really don't want to send them for every little thing. I want to deter the hypochondriacs, not punish those who really need the nurse.
     
  7. dbelmo

    dbelmo Rookie

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    We too have a school of 1500, we team teach too, I think if it is an issue with certain children maybe have a conference with the team of teachers and the child eplaining your concerns, and when it is necessary to go or not. This year I had a student "J" he was at lunch and slid off the bench on to the floor, said he hurt is arm and asked the music teacher (went there right after lunch) Music teacher said your ok its just a bruise, never went to nurse. 80 minutes later after lunch and music "J" came back for Lang. Arts, told me what happened and that Music teacher did not sent to nurse. So he looked like he was in pain, sent him to nurse with 10 minutes left of school-- Nurse called home, went to ER, BROKEN ARM IN 3 places!!!!!:eek: Needed a cast, well the parents were very angry with music teacher. Hypochondriac he was from Sept on but the arm happened in May. I willl always send, and with frequent fliers who think they are one up on me--- I always make some sarcastic remark while they go.

    dbelmo
     
  8. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

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    I send them for just about everything. The nurse always calls the parents and if they're repeat offenders for faking it the parents get really sick of the nurse calling and it stops abruptly.

    I got a nasty letter from a parent this year because her child said he had a headache & felt hot, and I didn't call her... we were on the bus leaving the museum when he told me he had a headache. I don't call parents on my personal cell phone and I really thought he was a little warm because we'd just walked 2 blocks to catch the bus and it was HOT outside and on the bus. In retrospect, I should have called the school, had them contact the mother, and then she could have chased the bus.
     
  9. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I feel like if I always send kids it opens up the floodgates. I want to get to the point where they won't even bother asking me unless something really is wrong, not just to get out of class for 15 minutes.
     
  10. hornetteacher

    hornetteacher Rookie

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    Do you ever feel like you just can't win for losing? Me too! Send a kid one too many times and the nurse (our secretary does is the nurse four days a week) get cranky with you, don't send them and parents are upset.

    After having a fridge in my room for about five year it dawned on me that I could have my own ice pack in the little freezer, and since the ice pack is a miracle cure for most 9/10 yr olds, it has saved many trips to the clinic.
     
  11. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I want to make it not worth a kids time to go to the nurse if they don't have to. How about an incident report that a kid has to fill out before they go and after they come back. I'll have a record of what's wrong and what the nurse does for parents if the kid is a frequent flyer. That could even serve as their pass to the nurse. I could always tell the kid I will fill it out for them or have another student else fill it out if the kid is really sick.

    What do you guys think about that idea?
     
  12. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    A few years ago I was a head councilor at a summer day camp.One of the children fell and hurt his wrist. He told his group leader he was okay and continued playing with his group at the offsite sight we were at. I made the mistake of not informing the camp about it. The next day I was called into the office and told the parent was really upset because the child had broken his wrist and she was not called.Needless to say the camp organizers were not happy with me.
    Since then I tend to be careful when a child tells he he needs to see the nurse.Unfortunately some children use it as an excuse to get out of doing work.If the child asks a few times I will call the parent to tell them what is going on.
     
  13. peggy27

    peggy27 Cohort

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    Are we the only state that doesn't have nurses? In my district we have 1 nurse for every 29 schools or so. The only time you see a nurse is if you have a student in your room with a health problem, like I had a boy with leukemia. We send students to the office for ice packs, bandaid in our rooms unless need a bigger bandaid, and have them call home to leave if they are sick.
     
  14. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Peggy, I have never heard of that. My last school shared nurses between two schools, and she spent time in the morning and afternoon at both schools.

    Yank, I understand that side of it too. There have been times when a kid told me they were okay, and I sent them to the nurse anyway. If a kid is acting peculiar and I think they might be hurt or sick I won't hesitate to send them down.
     
  15. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I think I will do an incident report. We have student led conferences where the kids gather information and must explain everything to the parents. Nurse incident reports and missing homework logs can be a part of the artifacts that they must show parents. I think knowing that a parent will see all of that stuff will be deterrent enough for most of the hypochondriacs. What do you guys think?
     
  16. alilisa

    alilisa Habitué

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    We don't send them in our school! We literally get yelled at by the health clerk! She won't check for lice (her job), won't let the kids lay down (she has 3 cots), won't call the parents (her job), sends them back to class if they are vomitting, when she can't reach the parents (her job). We always wait until she is on break and then send them down. The secretary is much nicer to deal with. I usually just have to call down and say I'm calling a parent to come and get their child and she says no problem. The health clerk gets mad because I didn't go through her (hmmm-I wonder why!) We usually just deal with everything on our own. We do have a LPN on staff in the medically fragile room, but we only use her for emergencies! (I don't want her to get frustrated with me!! :) )
     
  17. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I think your school needs to look for a new health clerk!
     
  18. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    I send them for anything that I can't handle in the classroom. I have ice and band-aids so that clears up a lot.

    When I was in school I did not tell the school about my medical condition. Therefore there were many times I lied to my teachers and said I had a headache when it really was me not feeling well. My mother knew this and was find with it. I think that this doesn't happen very often at all but it does happen. We do not know for sure what these kids have so might as well send them just in case.
     
  19. BASAM

    BASAM Comrade

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    We only have an actual nurse in the building one day a week so it falls on the shoulders of the office staff. I only send them straight down if they throw up (can't deal with it all.........once had to wait in the hall for five minutes while the janitor came it clean it up). If they tell me they are sick I touch their head and if they don't feel warm I tell them to put their head down/lay on the carpet and see how they feel in a bit, most go about just fine. If someone just seems plain miserable I will call parents myself/send email.
     
  20. hawkteacher

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    My school last year had a nurse on staff at all times and we weren't allowed to keep any band-aids or ice packs in our rooms.

    Most of the time, it's pretty easy to tell the kids who are truly sick vs. the ones who just want to leave the room and get a little special attention from the nurse. I always ask to feel their foreheads, if they're warm or they say they feel they might throw up, they go to the nurse immediately.

    If it's a headache, I tell them to get a good drink of water (most headaches are a result of dehydration), wait a bit and then let me know by x time if they still don't feel well.

    Students with noted medical conditions like asthma go immediately to the nurse when they ask.

    Any other issues, I usually tell them I'm sorry they're not feeling well. Let's give it a little while (usually I tell them until lunch) and see if they're feeling better. That usually takes care of it.
     
  21. ArizonaTchr72

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    I had a frequent flyer last year too! I handled this by allowing her one visit per week. She normally used her nurse pass first thing on Monday morning. I would keep the pass on my desk because she would be back by Wed asking me to go to the nurse. I would pull the pass out and say she already went for the week. There was two times when I could tell she was obviously ill so I sent her again, but most of the time she just wanted to get out of class.
     
  22. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    It depends on the child. I teach K, so I'm with my students all day long. I suppose it's different in the older grades. My students don't always ask to go to the nurse even when they need to. But if a child is acting different than usual, or a child who NEVER complains is complaining about even something "minor" then I will send them. I have band-aids and disposable thermometers in my room and use those as needed.
     
  23. Ghost

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    Just an idea...

    There was the vomit issue earlier in the thread and last night I had the idea of saving that plastic bucket that ice cream comes in (or several) and maybe wrapping it with colored duct tape so the kids have their own "barf bucket" when they feel sick. Then if they do get sick, they can carry it with them down the hall to the clinic.
     
  24. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    I have had frequent flyers- we are lucky because we have a cool nurse. She doesn't put up with the kids faking or acting up.

    Something that has helped my fakers is making them sit out of recess. If they are too sick to sit through class- then they can sit and "rest". That usually nips it!

    I always send them- I am afraid something bad will happen if I don't.
     
  25. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    I figure out who those "frequent flyers" are as well, and limit their trips to the nurse. I keep a large supply of band aids in the classroom. I only give them a band aid if their bleeding for longer than three seconds. Otherwise, they can supply their own band aids from home. I also have disposable thermometers in the classroom to take their temperatures if it's a student who always complains. I'm very selective on when I send a student to the nurse. If it's a student who never complains, then I will send them (if it's something the nurse can actually help with). Otherwise, I tell the kids to let their parents know when they get home. If it becomes a constant issue with the child, I call home and speak to the parents. I feel better about being more selective now that I've been teaching for seven years. My first couple of years, I sent the student to the nurse for EVERYTHING. I was scared the parents would call and yell at me (I bad experience with a particular parent my first year).

    I hate it when I have parents send their students to school to go and see the nurse so she can determine if their sick/hurt/etc.
     
  26. singingstacy

    singingstacy Rookie

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    In my student teaching there was a girl (4th grade) who would ask to go see the nurse every single day because she "felt soooo sick". I knew well enough to not let her go--- she just wanted to go home. I agree about the headache thing and also the bandaid thing.
     
  27. Terrence

    Terrence Comrade

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    I was strict about the nurse last year, but I'm going to be even more strict this year. Nobody will be allowed to go to the nurse for any reason, unless you are clearly injured- bleeding, broken/swollen limbs. My principle said at the end of last year not to even let females go up during class for their issues. They can do it during passing period. I guess the school is buying pads, and they spend a fortune, because they are finding that students open up the pad and just throw it away as an excuse to get out of class.
     
  28. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

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    Most things I take care of them myself. I tell the student to get a drink of water and rest their head if they complain of anything. Very rarely do I hear from them again. Of course, if some students just don't seem right physically (you can tell), I always send them down to see the nurse.
     
  29. Steph-ernie

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    Unless I think they're really sick, I try to make them wait a little while before going to the nurse. I'll tell them that they have to wait until the end of the math lesson, or until recess, or until lunch - whatever - because if they're faking, they will usually forget by then, and if I tell them to wait and see how they're doing during recess, they almost always magically heal by recess time! Sometimes I'll tell them to get a drink of water and take it easy, and that helps for a little while too. I keep bandaids in my room, but no ice. That's a quick trip, so I don't really mind them going for ice - they'll be back within 2 minutes.
     
  30. msmath

    msmath Rookie

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    Most of the time, I let anyone that asks go. I haven't really had a problem where too many kids were asking me to go to the nurse. But, I did have 2 kids who ALWAYS asked to go to the nurse in my class, and I believe they did this in other classes. I stopped letting them go unless it was clearly an emergency.

    Sometimes kids need to go for ice. Most of the time when I have been asked to go to the nurse, I can see the kid really doesn't feel well. I let them go to the bathroom whenever they ask too (unless it is being abused and they are always asking to go). I just ask that they wait until the worktime, and they do not ask to go when I am teaching the lesson.
     
  31. BASAM

    BASAM Comrade

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    I hate having an ice machine they always try to find a reason for it and then they play with their ice pouch. As it melts the bag will start to leak and they sit there and drink the water. A few of us started telling them that the teachers put their feet in the ice at the end of the day :whistle: so they really shouldn't be drinking it but they don't care.
     
  32. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Our nurse has these ziplock baggies that have wet paper towels that have been stuck in the fridge or freezer. Once I admitted to the nurse that I usually do the same thing in my classroom because it cuts down the trips, gives them TLC and provides a little numbness. The nurse jumped down my throat for a second until she realized MINE didn't have medicine. It just LOOKS like the one she has and the kids don't know the difference. They just know they get those just about everytime they go, even for headaches! I had to show one kid my first aid card and explain about how I am qualified to give bandaides and paper towel cool packs. Really I follow my teacher's philosophy. She doesn't want them going all the time. If in doubt, I send them to her or I send them to the infirmary.

    Generally speaking, we don't send them if it is a minor abrasion that hasn't resulted in any blood. A bandaid will do. If it has broken skin at all, we send them so the child doesn't risk an infection. If there is a bug bite but no swelling other than the minor bite itself, we don't send them. I might give them a cold pack though. For headaches and other things that don't seem like a major emergency we tend to give a cold pack and then the tell them if they still feel bad at the end of class, PLEASE let us know and we will gladly take them. Usually this deters them and gives us a chance to observe.

    Two things make me really think my view on it:

    1. One child last year constantly went. She had that "blah, blah" attitude in general and reported being tired all the time despite going to bed, according to her and dad, at decent hours. I made a comment, not the best kind, to the nurse one day when I took her and the nurse let me know that she had other health problems from birth and told me though that she thought this could be an issue with her chronic allergies especially since it frequently happened after recess. Though she didn't have nasal drip she might have had sinus headaches and allergy attacks do make you tired.

    2. I sent my OWN child to school one day and he seemed fine. He complained about his foot but wasn't crying and I thought he stubbed it. He walked to the bus stop and when I went outside to say something to him he was coherent. The nurse called and was TICKED because he was OBVIOUSLY having problems and I needed to take him to the doctor NOW. Yep, he broke his foot!

    Last year though there was a kid that asked the teacher if he could go to the nurse to pull his tooth. The teacher told him no. He went home and told his parents that I, the aide, refused to let him go to the nurse for his cold. Yes he had a cold, the same one the parents sent him to school with, but he never asked me to go to the infirmary or even once said he wasn't feeling good. The dad, without warning, attacked me by yelling at me and lunging his finger towards me repeatedly to accuse me of this misdeed. I was a bit shaken up after that.
     
  33. GatorGal

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    I always let the kid go if they ask. I've always been too worried that I'd deny them, and something would seriously be wrong.

    It does kind of annoy me though when I know nothing is wrong, and they just want to get out of a test or class next period.
     
  34. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    If they ask, they go. Period. I'm not a trained medical professional. I'm not going to deny anybody medical treatment when they ask for it.

    However, if they are frequent flyers, I do the following:
    -If they didn't feel well, then they need to "rest" during recess instead of play. Have a seat on the steps honey, because you aren't playing today! You'd better sit on the side for PE too!

    -Oh, poor baby! You've had to go to the nurse so many times. Guess I need to call home every single time you ask to go to the nurse from now on. So yes honey, you can go to the nurse -- but go pick up my phone and call mom at work so I can tell her you don't feel well.. again! (Boy, that nips it in the bud fast!)

    --Our nurse works with us on this one -- if the child goes too often, we send home a note from the nurse saying that due to the LARGE number of visits, we are concerned that there is an underlying medical problem -- and if there is another visit, the child will not be able to return to school until they get a checkup with the doctor, and bring a note in for us to see. Now that one really works!
     
  35. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 14, 2008


    Puke
    Blood
    If they feel warm
    If they aren't acting like themselves and say they don't feel well (lethargic, head on desk)

    The nurse always knows when I have a sub- my kids show up in her office- I send hardly anyone.
     
  36. traveler

    traveler Comrade

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    My kids will ask me for bandaids and I give them to them. If it is a new cut/scratch and needs more attention I'll send them up to the nurse. If they say they feel sick I send them up. We don't have a nurse. We have a health clerk. There are too many kids in my district with lawyers to not send them up when they ask. I sometimes worry when the HC sends them back so quickly if I will still get in trouble with the parents if they really are sick.

    I teach 1st so I think sometimes they just want a little TLC.
     
  37. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Whether I'm a sub or the actual teacher, I send them to the nurse for pretty much anything...unless, it's very obvious they're faking. I'm not getting in trouble if it ends up being something serious. You know, parents won't hesitate to just sue the district or the school anymore, they go after teachers themselves. So if you've shown any kind of negligence, etc., it's on YOUR head!

    This is another reason why teachers should have Educators Insurance. I always told myself I would get it when I got hired.
     
  38. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    I keep bandaids in my room and the kids ask me for them unless they are bleeding badly or it was caused by an undesirable object.

    I often have my kids get damp paper towels at the sink in the classroom to see how they feel before I send them down. I also allow them to go to the bathroom, geta drink, or rest their head on their desk. Kids with medical conditions like asthma go to the nurse whenever they ask. Also, if kids look different to me and they say they don't feel well, they go right away.
     
  39. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Chapped lips, a q tip dipped in a dab of vaseline.
    Band aids.
    ice packs, I like the paper towel and zip lock bag idea.
    squirt bottle of hand lotion.
    no recess.
     
  40. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    We have carbon incident reports that must be filled out each time a student goes to the nurse with date/time/problem. Students must take the form to the nurse, she fills it out and stamps with time student is released, deeps her copy and sends student back to class with my copy. The forms are sent home and like rainstorm posted, after multiple trips, letters are sent home questioning if student needs medical attention and the nurse will request a conference. Since I teach HS, I have no way of knowing if the student asking has been to the nurse every period of the day or is really sick. I send every student that asks to see the nurse. I don't have abuser's mostly because of the form with time and date stamp.
     
  41. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    I try to keep the office referrals to a minimum. If they have a headache they stay in the room unless they have a history of migranes or some other symptoms (like dizziness or fever or glassy eyes.) If they hurt themselves and need an ice pack I send them, but they come right back to class so they're not getting out of anything. I never send kids with stomach aches or who say they feel sick to their stomach unless we are going to recess or lunch. I just tell them to put the trash can next to their desks and aim for that. Again, if they've been sick for a while or a bug is going around the class/school I do send them.
     
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  1. John Macclearon,
  2. AspieWoman1989,
  3. Colliemom
Total: 291 (members: 3, guests: 251, robots: 37)
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