Sending 18mth old to montessori

Discussion in 'Montessori' started by Afitz, Aug 6, 2006.

  1. Afitz

    Afitz New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 6, 2006

    Hi everyone
    I am a first time mother and a student teacher. I was considering sending my little boy (18 mths) to a montesorri kindergarten and was wondering if anyone knows if there are differences for boys and girls who attend montessori? I live in Perth (Western Australia) but am assuming the general methods would be the same.:thanks: :)
     
  2.  
  3. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,775
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 6, 2006

    I am not a Montessori teacher, but I am hoping that one of the Montessori teachers will answer you soon. I know that Montessori can take many forms depending on the school, teachers, and locations. It is good to check the school out before sending your little son. I believe in general, Montessori schools should be run by very capable teachers who follow the correct methods of teaching. Contact Mommaruthie on the forum for more accurate details.
     
  4. wendi

    wendi Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2006
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2006

    Hi, Afitz,

    I'm a Montessorian, and I think boys and girls do equally well in class. One of the basic principles in Montessori is to "follow the child." This basically means that we teach each child as an individual, taking into consideration his/her personality, strengths and weaknesses, learning styles...so really, it doesn't matter what the child is like. No matter the sex, race, nationality, religion, family situation, academic ability, physical ability, maturity level, interests...(the list goes on and on), we'll attend to those qualities in that particular child.

    As far as the typical differences people perceive between girls and boys, if you believe these differences are present, you'll see them wherever you look. Montessori does, however, attend to each child's needs, so if we see a boy needs more work to gain better fine motor control, for example, then we'll introduce and encourage specific activities to exercise those skills. I suppose, therefore, one may see fewer "gender differences" by the end of the year, but it's not because of the child's gender; it's because of the child's needs. Get it? It's hard to explain.

    Lastly, just thought I'd warn you that not all schools that say they're Montessori, are in actuality. Montessori isn't trademarked (as you may have read elsewhere on this site, as I have,) so, any school can say it's "Montessori," but it's all in the philosophy and the use of the traditional Montessori materials.

    Hope that wasn't too long and preachy!
     
  5. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2006

    Hi! I did a search for "gender differences Montessori" on google and it came up with alot of interesting information.
    ITA with Wendi, because of the individualized nature of the Montessori philosophy, many different learning styles and abilities can be accomodated in the environment. I feel that the freedom for movement and activity makes Montessori ideal for children of either gender who are very active.
    Here is something interesting I found in a book I'm reading called "Montessori: The Science behind the Genius" by Angeline Lillard. She says "Along with academic skills and knowledge, children in Montessori learn to control their movements to an end, to make choices, to get along with others, to work as part of a community, to concentrate, and so on. Those skills are as relevant for boys as they are for girls. In fact, given the higher prevalence of attention and reading problems in boys generally, Montessori, with its special work on attention and on phonemic analysis at early ages, might be especially beneficial to boys. One of the two major Head Start studies using random assignment showed Montessori particularly benefits boys (Miller & Bizzell, 1984)."
    She does not state information about the higher prevalence of attention and reading problems for boys, but this is probably easy to find. Trying searching on eric.ed.gov.
    good luck!
     
  6. Afitz

    Afitz New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2006

    Thanks so much for your useful resources and knowledge. I really need to feel that I am doing the right thing so I will be reading all of the books/info I can get my hands on! Kind regards
     
  7. satisilver

    satisilver New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 29, 2006

    Afitz, I wanted to let you know that my son was about 18 months old when we put him in a montessori program. We were doing montessori as close as possible at home, but felt he needed a program where he would learn how to interact with other children, and felt that this was a perfect age. Because of montessori restraints, a school that had 2.5 to 6 took him because of our knowledge and prior work with him on it. But, I just wanted to say, he has done wonderful and I can see him learning more and more each day just through our interactions at home.
    Good Luck
     
  8. forbiddenpluto

    forbiddenpluto Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 19, 2007

    I just wanted to comment on this... I sent my 18 month to Montessori for her first experience in daycare... it's AMAZING! She's already counting and speaking spanish (I've got to catch up lol). I wouldn't send her anywhere else now!
     
  9. Gracy

    Gracy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 11, 2010

    hi!!
    please, could you advise where you can find montessory schools that provide pre kindy??....i ve been asking and all of them are only for kids from 3 years old and mine is 18 months only. I am looking a place where he can socialize and be involved with Montessori activities....thank you!!
     
  10. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jan 11, 2010

    Gracy,

    I would look at either the AMS website (American Montessori Society) or the AMI website. They'll have links to schools in your state.
     
  11. holley.padula

    holley.padula Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 12, 2010

    I'm a montessori trained infant/toddler teacher (3-6 also). Please ask away!

    H
     
  12. jas

    jas Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 24, 2010

    hi

    I am in your same situation....though by now your boy must have got the feeling of Montessori education.....plz. do share hows everything worked out and is this a good decision to send 18 months old for Montessori? Looking forward for your early reply.....All other opinions r most welcomed and i feel that will help us in making the decision.
     
  13. jas

    jas Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 7, 2010

    hi

    hi

    I stay at home with my kid.....
    What do u feel abt. sending child at 18 months to montessori or should he stay at home until 3 yrs....is it worth the money?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Iris1001,
  2. Mrs. K.,
  3. Ima Teacher
Total: 411 (members: 3, guests: 388, robots: 20)
test